Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Seasonal variations in the geochemistry of shallow groundwater hosted in granitic till: Research paper
Luleå University of Technology.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
1997 (English)In: Chemical Geology, ISSN 0009-2541, E-ISSN 1872-6836, Vol. 143, no 3-4, p. 205-216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The groundwater chemistry in a small catchment in northern Sweden has been studied for a period of 15 months, including two snowmelt events. The groundwater was sampled from two wells in a slope facing a small stream. One well was placed at the top of the slope (28 m from the stream), and the other was placed closer to the stream (13 m from the stream). Both wells were completed to approximately the same elevation (1.5 m below the stream bed). In addition to groundwater compositions, the chemical composition of precipitation, soil water and stream water was investigated. The chemical composition of the groundwater in the well farther from the stream was fairly constant during the studied period. In the closer well the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, Si, and alkalinity decreased by approximately 10% during snowmelt in May. In contrast, the concentrations of Fe, Al, Ce and Cu increased. After the snowmelt, during June and July, the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, Si, and alkalinity in the closer well increased by a factor of 2–5 compared with the concentrations prior to the snowmelt. By August, the concentrations had decreased to the same levels as before the snowmelt and remained constant until next snowmelt. To explain these variations the Ca/Sr ratio was used as a natural chemical tracer for different water masses. It was found that the increased concentrations of Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, Si, and alkalinity during summer was caused by changes in the groundwater flow direction, which resulted in upwelling of deeper groundwater. At this time the area at the closer well acted as an unsaturated discharge area. The concentrations of Fe, Al, Ce and Cu decreased rapidly after the snowmelt and then remained constant except for two peaks in July and August. These variations were due to mixing with rapidly percolating soil water from the E-horizon and melt water or rain water, which is supported by increased content of dissolved oxygen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1997. Vol. 143, no 3-4, p. 205-216
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6030DOI: 10.1016/S0009-2541(97)00116-2ISI: 000071397200006Local ID: 439581b0-dd08-11db-9cae-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-6030DiVA, id: diva2:978906
Note
Godkänd; 1997; 20070328 (pafi)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Öhlander, Björn

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Öhlander, Björn
By organisation
Geosciences and Environmental Engineering
In the same journal
Chemical Geology
Geochemistry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 25 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf