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Community based wildlife management failing to link conservation and financial viability
Department of Business, Economics and Law, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences. Department of Business, Economics and Law, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7206-6568
2015 (English)In: Animal Conservation, ISSN 1367-9430, E-ISSN 1469-1795, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 4-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Given the considerable popularity of community-based wildlife management as a conservation tool, it is of interest to assess the long-run sustainability of this policy not only in conservation terms, but also in financial terms. In this paper, we use cost–benefit analysis to study the social and financial sustainability of a large set of community conservancies in Namibia, one of the few countries where community-based wildlife management policies have been in place long enough to assess their long-term viability. We find that, although the social sustainability is generally good, the financial sustainability is problematic – especially for the younger conservancies: there is no real link between conservation achievements and financial success. This calls into question the long-term sustainability of many of these conservancies: if they are unable to generate enough revenue to pay for their running expenditure, they will eventually fail – even if they are successful from a conservation point of view. Similar problems, linked to the way in which external funders have pushed for additional conservancies to be established regardless of financial considerations, are likely to be present in other countries that have implemented such programmes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 18, no 1, p. 4-13
Keywords [en]
Business / Economics - Economics
Keywords [sv]
benefit-sharing, community conservancies, community-based wildlife management, cost–benefit analysis, Namibia, southern Africa, Ekonomi - Nationalekonomi
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6053DOI: 10.1111/acv.12134ISI: 000348900200002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84921515225Local ID: 43f9400d-3f5e-4d7d-a6aa-05ec13bccf92OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-6053DiVA, id: diva2:978930
Projects
Human Cooperation to Manage Natural Resources, Jordbruk i afrikanska länder - information och marknadsmakt
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20140423 (jessta)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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