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Clinical profile of delirium in older patients
Umeå University, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
Umeå University, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.
Umeå University, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
1999 (English)In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 1300-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence, psychiatric and behavior symptoms, differing symptom profiles, and diurnal variations of delirium in older patients. DESIGN: A descriptive, point prevalence study with a cross-sectional design. SETTING: One ordinary county hospital (n = 148), three nursing homes (n = 202), five old people's homes (n = 196), and home medical care patients (n = 171) in parts of a hospital catchment area in Mid-Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 717 patients 75 years of age and older were observed and assessed for the prevalence of delirium. Women accounted for 66.4% of the studied population, and the mean age for both sexes was 83.7 years. MEASUREMENTS: All patients were examined using the OBS (Organic Brain Syndrome) scale, and delirium was diagnosed according to DSM-III-R. RESULTS: Delirium was diagnosed in 315 of 717 (43.9%) patients, and 135 of 315 (42.9%) of the delirious patients had dementia. Thirty-seven percent of the patients with delirium were delirious in the afternoon, evening, or at night, and 47% of the delirious patients had morning delirium. The delirious patients presented a wide variety of psychiatric symptoms. More than half the patients exhibiting anxiety, psychomotor slowing, depressed mood, and irritability. Nearly 26% were classified as having hypoactive, 22% as having hyperactive, and 42% as having mixed delirium, whereas 11% had neither hypo- nor hyperactive delirium. Seventy-seven percent were classified as having delirium with pronounced emotional and 43% with pronounced psychotic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that patients with delirium have very different clinical profiles. This might indicate a need for different treatment strategies for patients with different types of delirium.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1999. Vol. 47, no 11, p. 1300-6
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6080Local ID: 44710390-9f0d-11db-8975-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-6080DiVA: diva2:978957
Note

Godkänd; 1999; 20070108 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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