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Computer mouse and track-ball operation: Similarities and differences in posture, muscular load and perceived exertion
Department of Occupational Health, Karolinska Hospital.
Department of Occupational Health, Karolinska Hospital.
National Institute for Working Life.
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1999 (English)In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 157-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Posture (optoelectronic 3D motion analysis system), muscular load (EMG), perceived exertion (rating scales), preference and productivity were investigated in 20 healthy VDU-operators (10 male and 10 female) during text editing with two different data input devices, a mouse and a track-ball. Work with the track-ball entailed lower shoulder elevation and less neck/shoulder muscle activity than work with the mouse. Arm support reduced muscle activity in the neck/shoulder region irrespective of input device used. A table height lower than 3 cm above elbow height allowed arm and shoulder support without undue shoulder elevation. Work with the track-ball entailed more wrist extension than work with the mouse. Perceived exertion ratings were lower for the shoulder and higher for the hand with track-ball than with mouse operation. Thus, biomechanical demands differ between different input devices. The women elevated and rotated their right shoulder outwards more than the men during work with both input devices. The overall EMG results showed a higher activity among the women than among the men in two of the examined muscles. This may relate to anthropometric differences which also influence biomechanical load moments. Another reason could be the observed differences in working techniques between the men and the women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1999. Vol. 23, no 3, p. 157-169
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6230DOI: 10.1016/S0169-8141(97)00031-0Local ID: 46e0faf0-6f15-11df-ab16-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-6230DiVA, id: diva2:979107
Note
Upprättat; 1999; 20100603 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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