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Removal and upgrading of lignocellulosic fermentation inhibitors by in situ biocatalysis and liquid-liquid extraction
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá.
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá.
DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
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2015 (English)In: Biotechnology and Bioengineering, ISSN 0006-3592, E-ISSN 1097-0290, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 627-632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hydroxycinnamic acids are known to inhibit microbial growth during fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates, and the ability to diminish hydroxycinnamic acid toxicity would allow for more effective biological conversion of biomass to fuels and other value-added products. In this work, we provide a proof-of-concept of an in situ approach to remove these fermentation inhibitors through constituent expression of a phenolic acid decarboxylase combined with liquid-liquid extraction of the vinyl phenol products. As a first step, we confirmed using simulated fermentation conditions in two model organisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that the product 4-vinyl guaiacol is more inhibitory to growth than ferulic acid. Partition coefficients of ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, 4-vinyl guaiacol, and 4-ethyl phenol were measured for long-chain primary alcohols and alkanes, and tetradecane was identified as a co-solvent that can preferentially extract vinyl phenols relative to the acid parent and additionally had no effect on microbial growth rates or ethanol yields. Finally, E. coli expressing an active phenolic acid decarboxylase retained near maximum anaerobic growth rates in the presence of ferulic acid if and only if tetradecane was added to the fermentation broth. This work confirms the feasibility of donating catabolic pathways into fermentative microorganisms in order to ameliorate the effects of hydroxycinnamic acids on growth rates, and suggests a general strategy of detoxification by simultaneous biological conversion and extraction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 112, no 3, p. 627-632
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6268DOI: 10.1002/bit.25473Local ID: 47898d5a-ecc1-41d7-9d7d-926ade32dddfOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-6268DiVA: diva2:979145
Note
Validerad; 2015; Nivå 2; 20141211 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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