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Trusting relationships and personal acquaintance: implications for business friendships
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
Deakin University, Melbourne.
2009 (English)In: Journal of General Management, ISSN 0306-3070, E-ISSN 1759-6106, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 37-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Friendship is very often a component of business relationships. Organisations frequently have relationships with their suppliers, customers and collaborators that could be described as 'friendly'. However, there is little comparative evidence concerning the extent to which business friendships resemble true social friendships. This article illustrates some differences that may exist between social and business friendships, with particular reference to the extent that interpersonal relationships are trusting, and are based on the nature of personal acquaintance. This means that managers need to understand the differences between business and personal friendships and adjust the type of interactions they, and those who report to them. have with customers, suppliers, collaborators, and the like.

Abstract [en]

Friendship is very often a component of business relationships. Organisations frequently have relationships with their suppliers, customers and collaborators that could be described as 'friendly'. However, there is little comparative evidence concerning the extent to which business friendships resemble true social friendships. This article illustrates some differences that may exist between social and business friendships, with particular reference to the extent that interpersonal relationships are trusting, and are based on the nature of personal acquaintance. This means that managers need to understand the differences between business and personal friendships and adjust the type of interactions they, and those who report to them. have with customers, suppliers, collaborators, and the like. Udgivelsesdato: Spring

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 34, no 3, p. 37-55
Keywords [en]
Business / Economics - Business studies
Keywords [sv]
Ekonomi - Företagsekonomi
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Industrial Marketing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-6512Local ID: 4bd5da20-b32d-11de-b4d6-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-6512DiVA, id: diva2:979397
Note
Validerad; 2009; 20091007 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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http://www.braybrooke.co.uk/dynamic/viewarticle.php?articleid=158

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Bäckström, Lars

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf