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Anatomical properties and process parameters affecting blister/blow formation in densified European aspen and downy birch sapwood boards by thermo-hygro-mechanical compression
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8404-7356
Wood Research Center (CRB), Department of Wood and Forest Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, Geography and Geomatics, Laval University, Quebec.
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 48, no 24, p. 8571-8579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Approximately, 13.5 % of the standing volume of productive forest land in Sweden is covered by birch and aspen, which provides the vast potential to produce value-added products such as densified wood. This study shows whether it is possible to densify those species with a thermo-hygro-mechanical (THM) process using heat, steam, and pressure. In this process, transverse compression on thin European aspen (Populus tremula) and downy birch (Betula pubescens) boards was performed at 200 ºC with a maximum steam pressure of 550 kPa. To obtain a theoretical 50 % compression set, the press’s maximum hydraulic pressure ranged from 1.5 to 7.3 MPa. Preliminary tests showed that ~75 % of the birch boards produced defects (blisters/blows) while only 25 % of the aspen boards did. Mainly, radial delamination associated with internal checks in intrawall and transwall fractures caused small cracks (termed blisters) while blows are characterized by relatively larger areas of delamination visible as a bumpy surface on the panel. Anatomical investigations revealed that birch was more prone to those defects than aspen. However, those defects could be minimized by increasing the pre-treatment time during the THM processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 48, no 24, p. 8571-8579
National Category
Bio Materials Other Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Wood Physics; Wood Products Engineering
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7066DOI: 10.1007/s10853-013-7679-9ISI: 000324111700028Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84891903228Local ID: 5618af53-b6b8-496d-a902-97c101649a98OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-7066DiVA, id: diva2:979953
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20130823 (sheahm)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Ahmed, Sheikh AliMorén, TomHagman, OlleElustondo, Diego

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