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Unmanned aircraft systems help to map aquatic vegetation
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
SmartPlanes Sweden AB, Skellefteå.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4208-345X
2014 (English)In: Applied Vegetation Science, ISSN 1402-2001, E-ISSN 1654-109X, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 334-348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

QuestionsDo high-resolution (sub-decimetre) aerial images taken with unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) allow a human interpreter to recognize aquatic plant species? Can UAS images be used to (1) produce vegetation maps at the species level; and (2) estimate species abundance? LocationOne river and two lake test sites in northern Sweden, middle boreal sub-zone. MethodsAt one lake and at the river site we evaluated accuracy with which aquatic plant species can be identified on printouts of UAS images (scale 1:800, resolution 5.6 cm). As assessment units we used homogeneous vegetation patches, referred to as vegetation stands of one or more species. The accuracy assessment included calibration and validation based on field controls. At the river site, we produced a digital vegetation map based on an UAS orthoimage (geometrically corrected image mosaic) and the results of the species identification evaluation. We applied visual image interpretation and manual mapping. At one of the lake sites, we assessed the abundance (four-grade scale) of the dominating Phragmites australis and produced a cover map. ResultsWe identified the species composition of vegetation stands at the lake and the river site with an overall accuracy of 95.1% and 80.4%, respectively. It was feasible to produce a digital vegetation map, albeit with a slight reduction in detail compared to the species identification step. At the site for abundance assessment, P. australis covered 20% of the total lake surface area, and 70% of the covered area had cover ≤25%. ConclusionsThe tested UAS facilitates lake and river vegetation identification and mapping at the species level, as well as abundance estimates

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 17, no 3, p. 334-348
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7080DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12072ISI: 000337725300018Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84902543218Local ID: 5655fbca-cc2f-499e-913a-3e20c7edb508OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-7080DiVA, id: diva2:979967
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20131217 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Husson, EvaEcke, Frauke

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