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Progressive resistance training after stroke: effects on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation
Department of Rehabilitation, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Lund University, Department of Health Sciences, Divison of Physiotherapy.
University of Liverpool, Department of mathematical sciences.
2008 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 42-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation after stroke. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial. SUBJECTS: Twenty-four subjects (mean age 61 years (standard deviation 5)) 6-48 months post-stroke. METHODS: The training group (n = 15) participated in supervised progressive resistance training of the knee muscles (80% of maximum) twice weekly for 10 weeks, and the control group (n = 9) continued their usual daily activities. Both groups were assessed before and after the intervention and at follow-up after 5 months. Muscle strength was evaluated dynamically and isokinetically (60 degrees /sec) and muscle tone by the Modified Ashworth Scale. Gait performance was evaluated by Timed "Up & Go", Fast Gait Speed and 6-Minute Walk tests, and perceived participation by Stroke Impact Scale. RESULTS: Muscle strength increased significantly after progressive resistance training with no increase in muscle tone and improvements were maintained at follow-up. Both groups improved in gait performance, but at follow-up only Timed "Up & Go" and perceived participation were significantly better for the training group. CONCLUSIONS: Progressive resistance training is an effective intervention to improve muscle strength in chronic stroke. There appear to be long-term benefits, but further studies are needed to clarify the effects, specifically of progressive resistance training on gait performance and participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 40, no 1, p. 42-8
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7081DOI: 10.2340/16501977-0129ISI: 000252744500007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-38849199741Local ID: 56575ec0-1689-11dd-9a8f-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-7081DiVA, id: diva2:979968
Note
Upprättat; 2008; 20080430 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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