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Embodied artificial agents for understanding human social cognition
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science. Technische Universität München, Institute for Cognitive Systems, Arcisstraße 21, München, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3323-7357
Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone, Aix Marseille University—CNRS, Marseille.
Technische Universität Muünchen, Institute for Cognitive Systems.
Number of Authors: 32016 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 371, no 1693, article id 20150375Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we propose that experimental protocols involving artificial agents, in particular the embodied humanoid robots, provide insightful information regarding social cognitive mechanisms in the human brain. Using artificial agents allows for manipulation and control of various parameters of behaviour, appearance and expressiveness in one of the interaction partners (the artificial agent), and for examining effect of these parameters on the other interaction partner (the human). At the same time, using artificial agents means introducing the presence of artificial, yet human-like, systems into the human social sphere. This allows for testing in a controlled, but ecologically valid, manner human fundamental mechanisms of social cognition both at the behavioural and at the neural level. This paper will review existing literature that reports studies in which artificial embodied agents have been used to study social cognition and will address the question of whether various mechanisms of social cognition (ranging from lower- to higher-order cognitive processes) are evoked by artificial agents to the same extent as by natural agents, humans in particular. Increasing the understanding of how behavioural and neural mechanisms of social cognition respond to artificial anthropomorphic agents provides empirical answers to the conundrum ‘What is a social agent?’

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 371, no 1693, article id 20150375
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7110DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2015.0375ISI: 000375333600014PubMedID: 27069052Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84963548248Local ID: 56dd5a19-436a-418c-ae02-f5586580db82OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-7110DiVA, id: diva2:979997
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; Bibliografisk uppgift: One contribution of 15 to a theme issue ‘Attending to and neglecting people’.; 20160412 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Wykowska, Agnieszka

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