Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Driving performance during visual and haptic menu selection with in-vehicle rotary device
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1705-8615
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9272-1520
2013 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 18, p. 123-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An in-vehicle haptic rotary device developed to interact with secondary tasks can provide haptic support to a visual interface and reduce the need to look away from the road. However, added haptic information intended to support interaction may distract the driver by adding cognitive load. This study examines how visual and haptic interfaces affect driver performance and if visual–haptic information could reduce effects of driver distraction. Four menu selection interfaces were compared: visual-only, visual–haptic with partly haptic support, visual–haptic with full haptic support, and haptic-only. The Lane Change Test was used with four measures. Interaction with the interfaces while driving caused increased driving deviation and delayed lane change initiation. The visual-only and the visual–haptic interface with partly haptic support caused erroneous crossed lanes. The haptic-only interface caused missed road signs. Full haptic support had the least negative effect on driver performance. In conclusion, haptic support could reduce effects of visual load without adding effects of cognitive load.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 18, p. 123-135
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7705DOI: 10.1016/j.trf.2012.12.011ISI: 000318322900011Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84873624955Local ID: 61e7477b-d97b-4110-8946-617982950754OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-7705DiVA, id: diva2:980595
Projects
EFESOS - Environmental Friendly efficient Enjoyable and Safety Optimized Systems
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20130212 (camgra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Grane, CamillaBengtsson, Peter

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Grane, CamillaBengtsson, Peter
By organisation
Human Work Science
In the same journal
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 264 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf