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Managing avalanches using cost-benefit-risk analysis
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part F, journal of rail and rapid transit, ISSN 0954-4097, E-ISSN 2041-3017, Vol. 226, no 6, p. 641-649Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Malmbanan, the Swedish Iron Ore Line, runs through rough terrain including high mountains, peat, terraces situated on fjords, and numerous short bridges and culverts. The area is sub-arctic and mountainous, with a sharp gradient between the part with a maritime climate and that with a continental climate. Global warming and new climate conditions are increasing the risk of slab and snow avalanches. A cost-benefit-risk analysis, dealing with slab and snow avalanches, high spring temperatures with fast snow melting, high water levels and heavy rainfalls, was performed in 2001. A number of at-risk sections along the track were identified and some of the risks were later addressed with changes in the infrastructure and changes in train operation during bad weather conditions. During the past 10 years, the various actions taken have been continuously improved. An evaluation based on operational data shows a lower risk of trains running into hazard areas and better control of slab and snow avalanches. Other improvements are better control and monitoring of rock falls and a lowered risk for trains operating during bad weather conditions. The technical systems in use consist of instrumented arrays of poles placed along the track to indicate avalanches. Bridges have been built to permit avalanches to pass under the railway and artificial tunnels have been designed and constructed to allow avalanches to pass over the railway. Rock fall nets have been put into service and professional avalanche inspection teams have been used for risk evaluation during high-risk weather conditions

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 226, no 6, p. 641-649
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7720DOI: 10.1177/0954409712447168Local ID: 62366ee2-be01-40c9-9f31-284ad785f4cdOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-7720DiVA: diva2:980610
Note
Upprättat; 2012; 20131009 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Larsson-Kråik, Per-Olof
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf