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Snowmelt pollutant removal in bioretention areas
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1725-6478
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
2007 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 41, no 18, p. 4061-4072Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Snow accumulating in urban areas and alongside roads can accumulate high pollutant loads and the subsequent snowmelt can produce high pollutant loads in receiving waters. This paper examines the treatment of roadside snowmelt in bioretention with respect to pollutant removal, pollutant pathways, and major sinks. Bioretention was used to treat snowmelt from three types of urban roads in Trondheim, Norway: residential, medium, and roads with high-density traffic. Metal retention in bioretention boxes had a mass reduction in zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium in the range of 89-99%, and a decrease in outflow concentrations in the range 81-99%. Cadmium was only measured in the water samples, while the other three metals were traced through the system to identify the main sinks. The top mulch layer was the largest sink for the retained metals, with up to 74% of the zinc retained in this mulch layer. The plant metal uptakes were only 2-8% of the total metal retention; however, the plants still play an important role with respect to root zone development and regeneration, which fosters infiltration and reduces the outflow load. Dissolved pollutants in snowmelt tend to be removed with the first flush of meltwater, creating an enrichment ratio with respect to the average pollutant concentrations in the snow. The effect of this enrichment ratio was examined through the bioretention system, and found to be less predominant than that typically reported for untreated snowmelt. The enrichment factors were in the range of 0.65-1.51 for the studied metals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 41, no 18, p. 4061-4072
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7734DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2007.05.040Local ID: 6267aec0-5183-11dc-959a-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-7734DiVA: diva2:980624
Note
Validerad; 2007; 20070823 (godble)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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