Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Ergonomics: an emerging concept in industrially developing countries
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
1989 (English)In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Industrialization via technology transfer is seen as the main development strategy by many developing countries (DC). The assumption that importation of advanced technology on its own, without adapting it to the environmental, physical, mental and sociocultural needs of the workforce in the receipient country would bring technical changes for the benefit of the majority of people has proved to be unrealistic. The failure to appreciate the characteristics and preferences of human operators has often frustrated technical development, alienated the work force and achieved little to improve the living and working conditions of the local people. Ergonomics is a useful tool for evaluating the choise of technology and its implementation and can contribute to the safe and productive transfer of technology. However, the area is fairly new or even unknown in many DC. They need assistance to acquire and apply the knowledge to their own need and capacity. It must also be emphasized that the available body of knowledge (e.g. standards, recommendations, procedures, etc.) concerning working conditions, occupational health and safety, which has been developed largely in industrialized countries (IC), often cannot be applied directly to DC, because of significant differences which are existing in all aspects of the work system between IC and DC. Since many factors influencing the nature, extent and diversity of problems are specific to each DC (e.g. climate, people, method of work, facilities, infrastructures of technology, finance, etc.) it is necessary to incorporate research into industrial development programmes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1989. Vol. 4, no 2, p. 91-100
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Work Environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8030DOI: 10.1016/0169-8141(89)90037-1Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0024733848Local ID: 6789fb00-652a-11dc-8a3f-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-8030DiVA, id: diva2:980920
Note
Godkänd; 1989; 20070917 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Shahnavaz, Houshang

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Shahnavaz, Houshang
By organisation
Human Work Science
In the same journal
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 7 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf