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Playing soccer increases serum concentrations of the biochemical markers of brain damage S-100B and neuron-specific enolase in elite players: a pilot study
Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå univesity.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3628-0705
2004 (English)In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 899-909Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To analyse serum concentrations of two biochemical markers of brain tissue damage, S-100B and NSE (neurone-specific enolase), in male soccer players in connection to the game. METHODS: Blood samples were taken in players before and after a competitive game and the numbers of headers and of trauma events during soccer play were assessed. RESULTS: Both S-100B and NSE were significantly raised in serum samples obtained after the game in comparison with the pre-game values (S-100B: 0.118 +/- 0.040 microg L(-1) vs 0.066 +/- 0.025 microg L(-1), p < 0.001; NSE: 10.29 +/- 2.16 microg L(-1) vs 8.57 +/- 2.31 microg L(-1), p < 0.001). Only changes in S-100B concentrations (post-game minus pre-gae values) were statistically significantly correlated to the number of headers (r = 0.428, p = 0.02) and to the number of other trauma events (r = 0.453, p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Playing competitive elite soccer was found to cause increase in serum concentrations of S-100B and NSE. Increases in S-100B were significantly correlated to the number of headers, and heading may accordingly have contributed to these increases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 18, no 9, p. 899-909
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8109DOI: 10.1080/02699050410001671865ISI: 000222178700005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-3242881687Local ID: 69033400-c288-11db-9ea3-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-8109DiVA, id: diva2:981000
Note

Validerad; 2004; 20070222 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Tegner, Yelverton

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