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Rock stress, rock stress measurements, and the Integrated Stress Determination Method (ISDM)
Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Luleå.
GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam.
Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1998-0769
2009 (English)In: Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering, ISSN 0723-2632, E-ISSN 1434-453X, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 559-584Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The primary objectives of this work are to (1) improve the understanding of the prevailing stress distribution at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in SE Sweden by employing an integrated stress determination approach, and in order to accomplish this (2) extend the existing stress integration methodology denominated integrated stress determination method (ISDM; Cornet in Comprehensive Rock Engineering vol 3, Pergamon Press, Oxford, pp 413-432, 1993a). The new developments of the ISDM involve a 12-parameter representation of the regional stress field in the rock mass (i.e., the full stress tensor and its variation with depth) that is applicable to hydraulic stress data (sleeve fracturing, hydraulic fracturing, and hydraulic tests on pre-existing fractures), overcoring data (CSIR- and CSIRO-type of devices), and to combinations of hydraulic and overcoring stress data. For the latter case, the elastic parameters of the overcoring technique may be solved in situ by allowing the hydraulic stress data to constrain them. As a result, the problem then involves 14 model parameters. Results from the study show that the ISDM effectively improves the precision of the prevailing stress field determination and that it is especially powerful for identification of consistencies/inconsistencies in an existing data set. Indeed, this is the very basic premise and goal of stress integration; combine all available data to achieve as complete a characterization of the mechanical stress model as possible, and not to identify a solution that fits only loosely the maximum amount of stress data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 42, no 4, p. 559-584
Keywords [en]
Civil engineering and architecture - Geoengineering and mining engineering
Keywords [sv]
Samhällsbyggnadsteknik och arkitektur - Geoteknik och gruvteknik
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8392DOI: 10.1007/s00603-009-0058-9ISI: 000269008900002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-69049086533Local ID: 6e6351b0-7162-11de-9f57-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-8392DiVA, id: diva2:981330
Note
Validerad; 2009; 20090715 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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