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Microelectronics mounted on a piezoelectric transducer: method, simulations, and measurements
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4958-146X
2006 (English)In: Ultrasonics, ISSN 0041-624X, E-ISSN 1874-9968, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the design of a highly integrated ultrasound sensor where the piezoelectric ceramic transducer is used as the carrier for the driver electronics. Intended as one part in a complete portable, battery operated ultrasound sensor system, focus has been to achieve small size and low power consumption. An optimized ASIC driver stage is mounted directly on the piezoelectric transducer and connected using wire bond technology. The absence of wiring between driver and transducer provides excellent pulse control possibilities and eliminates the need for broad band matching networks. Estimates of the sensor power consumption are made based on the capacitive behavior of the piezoelectric transducer. System behavior and power consumption are simulated using SPICE models of the ultrasound transducer together with transistor level modelling of the driver stage. Measurements and simulations are presented of system power consumption and echo energy in a pulse echo setup. It is shown that the power consumption varies with the excitation pulse width, which also affects the received ultrasound energy in a pulse echo setup. The measured power consumption for a 16 mm diameter 4.4 MHz piezoelectric transducer varies between 95 μW and 130 μW at a repetition frequency of 1 kHz. As a lower repetition frequency gives a linearly lower power consumption, very long battery operating times can be achieved. The measured results come very close to simulations as well as estimated ideal minimum power consumption.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 44, no 1, p. 1-11
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Research subject
Industrial Electronics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8497DOI: 10.1016/j.ultras.2005.06.004ISI: 000234986800001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-29244438819Local ID: 702c8b50-799f-11db-8824-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-8497DiVA, id: diva2:981435
Note
Validerad; 2006; 20061114 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, JonnyDelsing, Jerker

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