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Formation of hydrogen peroxide by sulphide minerals
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Minerals and Metallurgical Engineering.
2014 (English)In: Hydrometallurgy, ISSN 0304-386X, E-ISSN 1879-1158, Vol. 141, p. 82-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Formation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an oxidizing agent stronger than oxygen, by sulphide minerals during grinding was investigated. It was found that pyrite (FeS2), chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), sphalerite ((Zn,Fe)S), and galena (PbS), which are the most abundant sulphide minerals on Earth, generated H2O2 in pulp liquid during wet grinding in the presence of dissolved oxygen in water and also when the solids are placed in water immediately after dry grinding. Pyrite generated more H2O2 than other minerals and the order of H2O2 production by the minerals found to be pyrite > chalcopyrite > sphalerite > galena. The pH of water influenced the extent of hydrogen peroxide formation where higher amounts of H2O2 are produced at highly acidic pH. Furthermore, the effect of mixed sulphide minerals, i.e., pyrite–chalcopyrite, pyrite–galena, chalcopyrite–galena and sphalerite–pyrite, sphalerite–chalcopyrite and sphalerite–galena on the formation of H2O2 showed increasing H2O2 formation with increasing pyrite fraction in chalcopyrite–pyrite, galena–pyrite and sphalerite–pyrite compositions. The results also corroborate the amount of H2O2 production with the rest potential of the sulphide minerals; higher the rest potential of a sulphide mineral, formation of H2O2 is more. Most likely H2O2 is responsible for the oxidation of sulphide minerals and dissolution of non-ferrous metal sulphides in the presence of ferrous sulphide in addition to galvanic interactions. This study highlights the necessity of revisiting the electrochemical and/or galvanic interactions between pyrite and other sulphide minerals in terms of their flotation and leaching behaviour in the context of inevitable H2O2 existence in the pulp liquid.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 141, p. 82-88
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Research subject
Mineral Processing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8840DOI: 10.1016/j.hydromet.2013.10.011ISI: 000331350400012Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84888342964Local ID: 7639437c-d396-43bc-886d-609d0eb7de44OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-8840DiVA, id: diva2:981778
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20130905 (alijav)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Javadi, AlirezaKota, Hanumantha Rao

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