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Percieved difficulty in use of everyday technology in persons with aquired brain injury of different severity: a comparison with controls
Karolinska institute, Neurobiology Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy.
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet.
Karolinska institute, Neurobiology Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0341-6197
2014 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 635-641Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To compare the perceived difficulty in use of everyday technology in persons with acquired brain injury with different levels of severity of disability with that of controls.Methods: This comparison study recruited 2 samples of persons with acquired brain injury and controls, comprising a total of 161 participants, age range 18-64 years. The long and short versions of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire and the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale were used to evaluate participants.Results: Persons with acquired brain injury demonstrated lower mean levels of perceived ability in use of everyday technology than controls (F=21.84, degrees of freedom =1, p<0.001). Further analysis showed a statistically significant mean difference in perceived difficulty in use of everyday technology between persons with severe disability and good recovery, between persons with severe disability and controls, and between persons with moderate disability and controls. No significant mean difference was found between persons with severe disability and moderate disability, between persons with moderate disability and good recovery, and between persons with good recovery and controls.Conclusion: Perceived difficulty in using everyday technology is significantly increased among persons with acquired brain injury with severe to moderate disability compared with controls. Rehabilitation services should consider the use of everyday technology in order to increase participation in everyday activities after acquired brain injury.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 46, no 7, p. 635-641
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Occupational therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8859DOI: 10.2340/16501977-1818ISI: 000339147600005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84918774737Local ID: 76910b70-f25b-4974-8851-b7690f272624OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-8859DiVA, id: diva2:981797
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20140815 (johsod)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Larsson-Lund, Maria

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