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Assessment of the contamination from devices used for sampling and storage of whole blood and serum for element analysis
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4505-4590
Luleå tekniska universitet.
2001 (English)In: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0946-672X, E-ISSN 1878-3252, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 40-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An assessment of potential contamination risk associated with devices routinely used in hospitals and clinical laboratories for sampling and storage of whole blood and serum was made by analysis of leachates from the devices. The devices checked were disposable stainless steel needles, different types of blood collection tubes; serum separation tubes, disposable plastic pipettes and plastic vials used for serum storage. Concentrations of about 70 elements in solution after leaching with 0.05 mol l(-1) HNO3 were determined by double focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sector field ICP-MS). For the elements present in blood/serum at concentrations higher than 10 ng ml(-1) (Na, Ca, Mg, P, Fe, Br, Si, Zn, Cu, Rb, Se and I) contribution from devices was as a rule negligible (less than 1% of expected concentrations in the body fluids), but for the majority of trace and ultra-trace elements it may significantly affect or even prevent accurate determination. The highest trace element contribution was found to derive from commercially available blood collection and serum separation tubes. Apparent concentrations of Al, Ba, Th, rare earth, and some other elements resulting from contamination were higher than normal serum concentrations all types of tubes tested for.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 15, no 1, p. 40-5
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9077DOI: 10.1016/S0946-672X(01)80025-0ISI: 000171440700008Local ID: 7a3440b0-7804-11dd-955a-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-9077DiVA, id: diva2:982015
Note
Validerad; 2001; 20080901 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Rodushkin, Ilya

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