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Genetic biodiversity in the Baltic Sea: species-specific patterns challenge management
Stockholm University.
Stockholm University.
Stockholm University.
University of Washington.
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2013 (English)In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 22, no 13-14, p. 3045-3065Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Information on spatial and temporal patterns of genetic diversity is a prerequisite to understanding the demography of populations, and is fundamental to successful management and conservation of species. In the sea, it has been observed that oceanographic and other physical forces can constitute barriers to gene flow that may result in similar population genetic structures in different species. Such similarities among species would greatly simplify management of genetic biodiversity. Here, we tested for shared genetic patterns in a complex marine area, the Baltic Sea. We assessed spatial patterns of intraspecific genetic diversity and differentiation in seven ecologically important species of the Baltic ecosystem-Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), northern pike (Esox lucius), European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), nine-spined stickleback (Pungitius pungitius), blue mussel (Mytilus spp.), and bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus). We used nuclear genetic data of putatively neutral microsatellite and SNP loci from samples collected from seven regions throughout the Baltic Sea, and reference samples from North Atlantic areas. Overall, patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation among sampling regions were unique for each species, although all six species with Atlantic samples indicated strong resistence to Atlantic-Baltic gene-flow. Major genetic barriers were not shared among species within the Baltic Sea; most species show genetic heterogeneity, but significant isolation by distance was only detected in pike and whitefish. These species-specific patterns of genetic structure preclude generalizations and emphasize the need to undertake genetic surveys for species separately, and to design management plans taking into consideration the specific structures of each species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 22, no 13-14, p. 3045-3065
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9237DOI: 10.1007/s10531-013-0570-9ISI: 000327395300004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84888291044Local ID: 7cda7280-e83a-4fb2-97d3-937464b5ac0eOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-9237DiVA, id: diva2:982175
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20131108 (annicas)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Sandström, Annica

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