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Heavy metal removal in cold climate bioretention
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1725-6478
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim.
2007 (English)In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 183, no 1-4, p. 391-402Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A bioretention media is a stormwater treatment option designed to reduce peak runoff volumes and improve water quality through soil infiltration and plant mitigation. To investigate the heavy metal removal in a bioretention media in a cold climate setting, a small pilot sized bioretention box was built in Trondheim, Norway. The system was sized using the Prince Georges County bioretention design method from 1993. Three runoff events, created using historical data, were undertaken in April 2005 and then again in August 2005. Both the peak flow reduction and the total volume reduction were significantly lower in April compared to August. Peak flow reduction was 13% in April versus 26% in August and the total volume reduction was 13% in April versus 25% in August. Metal retention was good for both seasons with 90% mass reduction of zinc, 82% mass reduction of lead and 72% mass reduction of copper. Plant uptake of metals was documented between 2 to 7%; however adsorption and mechanical filtration through the mulch and soil column were the most dominant metal retention processes. The metal retention was independent of the selected hydraulic loading rates (equivalent to 1.4–7.5 mm h−1 precipitation) showing that variable inflow rates during this set of events did not affect the treatment efficiency of the system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 183, no 1-4, p. 391-402
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9455DOI: 10.1007/s11270-007-9387-zISI: 000247392100034Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-34249821375Local ID: 817d0d40-5abc-11dc-8a1d-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-9455DiVA, id: diva2:982393
Note
Validerad; 2007; 20070904 (pafi)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Viklander, Maria

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