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Extraction, recovery, and characterization of hardwood and grass hemicelluloses for integration into biorefining processes
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9313-941X
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing.
2012 (English)In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 51, no 34, p. 11045-11053Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For this work, four hardwoods (silver birch, sugar maple, a hybrid poplar, and a hybrid aspen) and one cultivar of switchgrass were treated with increasing levels of NaOH. The recovered cell wall biopolymers were characterized based on total extraction, precipitation using ethanol or acidification, xylan content, and molar mass of the recovered precipitates. The extractability of cell wall polymers was clearly shown to be a function of the biomass type with more than 50% of the cell walls of switchgrass solubilized by alkali while only up to 20% of the maple was solubilized under comparable conditions. Precipitation with ethanol resulted in high recovery yields of hemicelluloses from the original biomass for silver birch and switchgrass, and most notably, the birch precipitates contained double the hemicellulose content of the precipitates from other feedstock alkali extracts (80% versus 30-50%). The molar masses of the recovered hemicellulosic polysaccharides were characterized using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and an assay to quantify polysaccharide reducing ends. SEC analysis showed that the biopolymers exhibited a strong tendency to self-associate during elution and that this aggregation could be eliminated through sonication. The reducing end method showed an increase in the number-average degree of polymerization toward an asymptotic maximum with increasing extraction pH, and this value was significantly increased by bleaching the precipitate to remove interference by nonpolysaccharides

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 51, no 34, p. 11045-11053
National Category
Bioprocess Technology
Research subject
Biochemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9583DOI: 10.1021/ie301260wISI: 000308043500007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84865663015Local ID: 83ae8891-b80f-4210-bd58-d076088034c7OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-9583DiVA, id: diva2:982521
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120913 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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