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Influence of intermittent wetting and drying conditions on heavy metal removal by stormwater biofilters
Facility for Advancing Water Biofiltration, Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University.
Facility for Advancing Water Biofiltration, Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University.
Facility for Advancing Water Biofiltration, Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University.
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2009 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 43, no 18, p. 4590-4598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biofiltration is a technology to treat urban stormwater runoff which conveys pollutants, including heavy metals. However, the variability of metals removal performance in biofiltration systems is as yet unknown.A laboratory study has been conducted with vegetated biofilter mesocosms, partly fitted with a submerged zone at the bottom of the filter combined with a carbon source. The biofilters were dosed with stormwater according to three different dry/wet schemes, to investigate the effect of intermittent wetting and drying conditions on metal removal.Provided that the biofilters received regular stormwater input, metal removal exceeded 95%. The highest metal accumulation occurs in the top layer of the filter media.However, after antecedent drying before a storm event exceeding three to four weeks the filters performed significantly worse, although metal removal still remained relatively high. Introducing a submerged zone into the filter improved the performance significantly after extended dry periods. In particular, copper removal in filters equipped with a submerged zone was increased by around 12% (α = 0.05) both during wet and dry periods and for lead the negative effect of drying could completely be eliminated, with consistently low outflow concentrations even after long drying periods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 43, no 18, p. 4590-4598
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9753DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2009.07.008ISI: 000271439600016PubMedID: 19683781Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-71849096750Local ID: 86d19130-7243-11de-9f57-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-9753DiVA, id: diva2:982691
Note
Validerad; 2009; 20090716 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Blecken, Godecke-TobiasViklander, Maria

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