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Heavy metal concentrations and toxicity in water and sediment from stormwater ponds and sedimentation tanks
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1725-6478
Department of Natural Sciences, Middlesex University.
Department of Natural Sciences, Middlesex University.
2010 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 178, no 1-3, p. 612-618Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sedimentation is a widely used technique in structural best management practices to remove pollutants from stormwater. However, concerns have been expressed about the environmental impacts that may be exerted by the trapped pollutants. This study has concentrated on stormwater ponds and sedimentation tanks and reports on the accumulated metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and the associated toxicity to the bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The metal concentrations are compared with guidelines and the toxicity results are assessed in relation to samples for which metal concentrations either exceed or conform to these values. The water phase metal concentrations were highest in the ponds whereas the sedimentation tanks exhibited a distinct decrease towards the outlet. However, none of the water samples demonstrated toxicity even though the concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn exceeded the threshold values for the compared guidelines. The facilities with higher traffic intensities had elevated sediment concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn which increased towards the outlet for the sedimentation tanks in agreement with the highest percentage of fine particles. The sediments in both treatment facilities exhibited the expected toxic responses in line with their affinity for heavy metals but the role of organic carbon content is highlighted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 178, no 1-3, p. 612-618
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10090DOI: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2010.01.129ISI: 000278056300082PubMedID: 20153579Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77951498113Local ID: 8d5fd070-e327-11de-bae5-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-10090DiVA, id: diva2:983030
Note
Validerad; 2010; 20091207 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Karlsson, KristinViklander, Maria

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