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Laser-induced damage and destruction of HiPCO nanotubes in different gas environments
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4254-5020
Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l'Environnement, Nancy Université.
Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS – Nancy Université.
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2011 (English)In: Physica status solidi. B, Basic research, ISSN 0370-1972, E-ISSN 1521-3951, Vol. 248, no 11, p. 2540-2543Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have studied the thermal and chemical stability of HiPCO-produced single-walled carbon nanotube bundles to high laser power in air and argon. The samples were exposed to 110 kW/cm2 during 8 h with a 1.96 eV laser and the temperature was monitored via downshift of G+-Raman peak. The structural changes in the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) caused by laser heating were monitored by recording their Raman spectra at ambient T (reference conditions) to ensure unaltered resonance conditions. The initial temperature was estimated to be 550 °C and 870 °C in air and argon, respectively. The Raman signal intensity from the CNTs radial breathing mode (RBM) increased rapidly at the beginning of the laser heating both under air and argon due to desorption of impurities for all but the smallest diameter CNTs. The temperature dropped by 30% under argon and 60% under air due to destruction of the absorbers – CNTs in resonance with incident radiation. The final RBM spectra exhibited intensity loss only for the smallest diameter CNTs in argon atmosphere and for all but the largest diameter CNTs in air. Our results demonstrate the importance of (i) impurity desorption from exterior and interior of CNTs; (ii) different temperature thresholds for the CNT destruction due to oxidation and overheating; (iii) the role of photon absorbers on the thermal stability of the sample. The small diameter CNTs are more easily destroyed than large diameter ones. The metallic nanotubes also tend to have lower thermal stability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 248, no 11, p. 2540-2543
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Fysik
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10253DOI: 10.1002/pssb.201100136ISI: 000297517100026Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84868642584Local ID: 90802bc5-57ad-4f23-b4cd-bc7eff975e7eOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-10253DiVA, id: diva2:983193
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Validerad; 2011; 20111216 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Mases, MattiasNoël, MaximeSoldatov, Alexander

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