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Determination of crosscutting safety zone for finger-jointed Pinus sylvestris furniture components
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2247-674X
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
2012 (English)In: Forest products journal, ISSN 0015-7473, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 107-113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A common problem with finger-jointed wooden furniture components is chipping in the finger joints due to fiber deviations around sound knots. To avoid this, a fixed size safety zone between defects and crosscuts is used, but can lead to an excess of material cut away in the crosscutting operation. To reduce chippings in finger joints while maximizing recovery, an adaptive strategy was developed for setting the safety zone size between sound knots and finger joints in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) furniture components. The strategy was based upon modeling the risk of chipping the finger joint depending on the knot measurement. The model was used in an adaptive strategy in order to minimize the expected loss due to cutting away material around knots, compared with the cost of rejecting components in later stages due to chipped finger joints. Thus, each knot was assigned a unique safety zone. The strategy was tested using computer simulation of the finger-jointing process, and a sensitivity analysis was performed in order to quantify the effect of variations in the input data. The results show that the adaptive strategy improves recovery by at least 3 percent in the process of turning lumber into finger-jointed furniture components. It is very robust toward variations in knot size measurements (e.g., by scanning equipment), but less robust toward variations in crosscutting precision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 62, no 2, p. 107-113
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Wood Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10392Local ID: 932d2163-2bce-4be7-9a85-43e952c49469OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-10392DiVA, id: diva2:983337
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20121029 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Fredriksson, MagnusÖhman, MicaelSong, Haitong

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