Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Critical care nurses' experiences: a good relationship with the patient is a prerequisite for successful pain management
Luleå tekniska universitet.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6244-6401
2011 (English)In: Pain Management Nursing, ISSN 1524-9042, E-ISSN 1532-8635, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a lack of studies describing how critical care nurses experience assessing and treating pain in patients receiving postoperative care in an intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to describe those experiences. Qualitative personal interviews with six critical care nurses in an ICU in northern Sweden were conducted during 2009. The interview texts were subjected to qualitative content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme and four categories. It was important to be able to recognize signs of pain in patients unable to communicate verbally. In older patients, anxiety could be interpreted as an indication of pain. Pain was primarily assessed by means of a visual analog scale. Being unable to treat pain successfully was experienced as failing in one's work. Pharmacologic treatment was always the first choice for relief. The environment was experienced as a hindrance to optimal nursing care, because all postoperative patients shared a room with only curtains between them. The work of assessing and treating pain in patients receiving postoperative care is an important and frequent task for critical care nurses, and knowledge in the field is essential if the patients are to receive optimal nursing care and treatment. Patients cared for in an ICU might benefit from nonpharmacologic treatment. Being without pain after surgery implies increased well-being and shorter hospitalization for the patient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 12, no 3, p. 163-172
Keywords [en]
Caring sciences - Nursing
Keywords [sv]
Vårdvetenskap - Omvårdnad
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10608DOI: 10.1016/j.pmn.2010.03.009ISI: 000295074000005PubMedID: 21893305Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-80052411212Local ID: 97094900-37e9-11df-be5c-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-10608DiVA, id: diva2:983553
Note

Validerad; 2011; 20100325 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Engström, Åsa

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Engström, Åsa
By organisation
Nursing Care
In the same journal
Pain Management Nursing
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 31 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf