Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A study on the toxic effects of chloride on the biooxidation efficiency of pyrite
Boliden Mineral AB.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
2009 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 172, no 2-3, p. 1273-1281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bioleaching operations in areas with limited chloride-free water and use of ashes and dust as neutralizing agents have motivated to study the chloride toxicity and tolerance level of the microorganisms. Biooxidation of pyrite using chloride containing waste ash compared with Ca(OH)2 + NaCl as neutralizing agent was investigated to evaluate the causes of low pyrite oxidation. Both precipitation of jarosite as well as the toxic effect of chloride on the microorganisms were responsible for lower pyrite recoveries. Another study with sudden exposure of chloride during pyrite biooxidation, addition of 4 g/L was lethal for the microorganisms. Addition of 2 g/L chloride resulted in precipitation of jarosite with slightly lower pyrite recovery whereas the addition of 3 g/L chloride temporarily chocked the microorganisms but activity was regained after a short period of adaptation. Population dynamics study conducted on the experiment with 3 g/L chloride surprisingly showed that Leptospirillum ferriphilum, which was dominating in the inoculum, completely disappeared from the culture already before chloride was added. Sulphobacillus sp. was responsible for iron oxidation in the experiment. Both Acidithiobacillus caldus and Sulphobacillus sp. were adaptive and robust in nature and their numbers were slightly affected after chloride addition. Therefore, it was concluded that the microbial species involved in the biooxidation of pyrite vary in population during the different stages of biooxidation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 172, no 2-3, p. 1273-1281
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Research subject
Process Metallurgy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11369DOI: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2009.07.133ISI: 000271980800101PubMedID: 19720455Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-71749112371Local ID: a51f0780-7d0b-11de-8da0-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-11369DiVA, id: diva2:984319
Note
Validerad; 2009; 20090730 (sekgah)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Gahan, Chandra SekharSandström, Åke

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gahan, Chandra SekharSandström, Åke
By organisation
Sustainable Process Engineering
In the same journal
Journal of Hazardous Materials
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 76 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf