Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 139
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abba, Alia Besma
    et al.
    Laboratory of Water and Environment Engineering in Saharan Environment, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Saggai, Sofiane
    Laboratory of Water and Environment Engineering in Saharan Environment, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Touil, Youcef
    Laboratory of Biogeochemical of Desert Environment, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Kouadri, Saber
    Laboratory of Water and Environment Engineering in Saharan Environment, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Nouasria, Fatima Zohra
    Dynamic Interactions and Reactivity of Systems, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Najm, Hadee Mohammed
    Department of Civil Engineering, Zakir Husain Engineering College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, India.
    Mashaan, Nuha S.
    Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.
    Eldirderi, Moutaz Mustafa A.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Khalid University, Abha 61421, Saudi Arabia.
    Khedher, Khaled Mohamed
    Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, King Khalid University, Abha 61421, Saudi Arabia; Department of Civil Engineering, High Institute of Technological Studies, Mrezgua University Campus, Nabeul 8000, Tunisia.
    Copper and Zinc Removal from Wastewater Using Alum Sludge Recovered from Water Treatment Plant2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 16, article id 9806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to determine Aluminum sludge composition and structure for its valorisation as an alternative natural material for heavy metals removal from wastewater for further reuse as treated water in different applications. The study was conducted to investigate the introduction of Al-bearing sludge composition. The physical and chemical properties were examined using X-ray diffraction tests (XRD), scanning electron microscope tests (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared tests (FTIR), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller tests (BET). Furthermore, the heavy metal concentrations of synthetic wastewater were measured using the spectrophotometry method. The experimental procedure is based on testing different pH limits and amounts of aluminum sludge to find the optimum conditions for copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal. The results demonstrated a high removal efficiency where its value reached up to 97.4% and 96.6% for Zn and Cu, respectively, in an acidic medium (pH = 6) using a relatively high amount of sludge (1400 mg). Nevertheless, a low efficiency was obtained in the strongly acidic medium (pH = 4) and a smaller sludge amount of about 480 mg.

  • 2.
    Abd El‑Hameed, Mona M.
    et al.
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, 12613, Egypt.
    Abuarab, Mohamed E.
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, 12613, Egypt.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Abdel Mottaleb, Shady
    Agricultural Botany Department - Plant Physiology Division, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.
    Bakeer, Gomaa A.
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, 12613, Egypt.
    Gyasi‑Agyei, Yeboah
    School of Engineering and Built Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD, 4111, Australia.
    Mokhtar, Ali
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, 12613, Egypt.
    Phycoremediation of contaminated water by cadmium (Cd) using two cyanobacterial strains (Trichormus variabilis and Nostoc muscorum)2021In: Environmental Sciences Europe, ISSN 2190-4707, E-ISSN 2190-4715, Vol. 33, no 1, article id 135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Water pollution with heavy metals is a severe dilemma that concerns the whole world related to its risk to natural ecosystems and human health. The main objective was to evaluate the removal efficiency of Cd of various concentrations from contaminated aqueous solution by use of two cyanobacterial strains (Nostoc muscorum and Trichormus variabilis). For this purpose, a specially designed laboratory pilot-scale experiment was conducted using these two cyanobacterial strains on four different initial concentrations of Cd (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg L−1) for 21 days.

    Results

    N. muscorum was more efficient than T. variabilis for removing Cd (II), with the optimum value of residual Cd of 0.033 mg L−1 achieved by N. muscorum after 21 days with initial concentration of 0.5 mg L−1, translating to removal efficiency of 93.4%, while the residual Cd (II) achieved by T. variabilis under the same conditions was 0.054 mg L−1 (89.13% removal efficiency). Algal growth parameters and photosynthetic pigments were estimated for both cyanobacterial strains throughout the incubation period.

    Conclusions

    High Cd concentration had a more toxic impact on algal growth. The outcomes of this study will help to produce treated water that could be reused in agrarian activities.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Al Bayaty, Majd
    et al.
    Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Babylon, Babylon 51001, Iraq.
    Al Mousawi, Eman
    Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Babylon, Babylon 51001, Iraq.
    Jahad, Udai A.
    Department of Environment Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Babylon, Babylon 51001, Iraq.
    Chabuk, Ali
    Department of Environment Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Babylon, Babylon 51001, Iraq.
    Majdi, Ali
    Department of Building and Construction Techniques Engineering, Al-Mustaqbal University College, Babylon 51001, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Laue, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Riparian Management and Nutrients Distribution in Different Zones of Euphrates Riverbanks2023In: International Journal of Design & Nature and Ecodynamics, ISSN 1755-7437, E-ISSN 1755-7445, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic of nutrient cycling is a critical factor in riparian regions. It is essential to understand the behaviour of riparian areas in the maintenance and management river ecosystem. Sediment load, nutrients, and pathogens are transported to water bodies through land drainage and riverside flow. The classification of environmental agencies was poor for them. In this study, a qualitative investigation was implemented to determine the relationship between these practices and variations in nutrient retention for several types of riverbank soil. Also, the riverbank soils were including soil covered by wild reed plants. All the field works were along the Euphrates River in three locations. Moreover, study the variation in the content of vegetation riverbank soils from nitrogen, organic matter (OM), potassium (K), phosphorus (P), and PH. The results presented that riverbanks consider important locations for nutrient retention. Whilst agricultural activities have minimized the content of soil of OM (30%), N (49%), and K (3%), in subsurface soil but not so great lowering in surface layers. In contrast, management practices and human activities such as burning caused an apparent increase of OM (4%), N (77%), and a clear reduction in P (12%) content at both surface and subsurface layers of soil. Under all circumstances, riverbank soils showed a relative increase of nutrients at wet toe-slopes. Furthermore, it is noted that riparian vegetation and aquatic plants played a significant role by causing critical changes in riparian sides or even contrary effects on riverbank management practices and destruction of natural soil nutrient conditions. Thus, it should be carefully considered when evaluating the ecological impacts of riparian disturbances.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Alakangas, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Maurice, Christian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Macsik, Josef
    Strategic services & Sustainable Development at Ecoloop AB, Sweden.
    Nyström, Elsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Sandström, Nadia
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Andersson-Wikström, Alexandra
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hällström, Lina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Kartläggning av restprodukter för efterbehandling och inhibering av gruvavfall: Funktion, tillgång och logistik2014Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 5.
    AlOmar, Mohamed Khalid
    et al.
    Department of Civil Engineering, Al-Maarif University College, 31001 Ramadi, Iraq .
    Hameed, Mohammed Majeed
    Department of Civil Engineering, Al-Maarif University College, 31001 Ramadi, Iraq; Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM),43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia .
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Razali, Siti Fatin Mohd
    Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM),43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia .
    AlSaadi, Mohammed Abdulhakim
    Natural and Medical Sciences Research Center (NMSRC), University of Nizwa Sultanate of Oman, Nizwa, Oman .
    Short-, Medium-, and Long-Term Prediction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions using Wavelet-Enhanced Extreme Learning Machine2023In: Civil Engineering Journal, ISSN 2676-6957, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 815-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the main greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Early prediction of CO2 is critical for developing strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change. A sophisticated version of the extreme learning machine (ELM), the wavelet enhanced extreme learning machine (W-EELM), is used to predict CO2 on different time scales (weekly, monthly, and yearly). Data were collected from the Mauna Loa Observatory station in Hawaii, which is ideal for global air sampling. Instead of the traditional method (singular value decomposition), a complete orthogonal decomposition (COD) was used to accurately calculate the weights of the ELM output layers. Another contribution of this study is the removal of noise from the input signal using the wavelet transform technique. The results of the W-EELM model are compared with the results of the classical ELM. Various statistical metrics are used to evaluate the models, and the comparative figures confirm the superiority of the applied models over the ELM model. The proposed W-EELM model proves to be a robust and applicable computer-based technology for modeling CO2concentrations, which contributes to the fundamental knowledge of the environmental engineering perspective.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    AlOmar, Mohamed Khalid
    et al.
    Department of Civil Engineering, Al-Maarif University College, Ramadi, Iraq.
    Khaleel, Faidhalrahman
    Department of Civil Engineering, Al-Maarif University College, Ramadi, Iraq.
    AlSaadi, Abdulwahab Abdulrazaaq
    Department of Computer Engineering Technics, Al-Maarif University College, Ramadi, Iraq.
    Hameed, Mohammed Majeed
    Department of Civil Engineering, Al-Maarif University College, Ramadi, Iraq; Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia.
    AlSaadi, Mohammed Abdulhakim
    Natural and Medical Sciences Research Center, University of Nizwa, Nizwa, Sultanate of Oman.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    The Influence of Data Length on the Performance of Artificial Intelligence Models in Predicting Air Pollution2022In: Advances in Meteorology, ISSN 1687-9309, E-ISSN 1687-9317, Vol. 2022, article id 5346647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air pollution is one of humanity's most critical environmental issues and is considered contentious in several countries worldwide. As a result, accurate prediction is critical in human health management and government decision-making for environmental management. In this study, three artificial intelligence (AI) approaches, namely group method of data handling neural network (GMDHNN), extreme learning machine (ELM), and gradient boosting regression (GBR) tree, are used to predict the hourly concentration of PM2.5 over a Dorset station located in Canada. The investigation has been performed to quantify the effect of data length on the AI modeling performance. Accordingly, nine different ratios (50/50, 55/45, 60/40, 65/35, 70/30, 75/25, 80/20, 85/15, and 90/10) are employed to split the data into training and testing datasets for assessing the performance of applied models. The results showed that the data division significantly impacted the model's capacity, and the 60/40 ratio was found more suitable for developing predictive models. Furthermore, the results showed that the ELM model provides more precise predictions of PM2.5 concentrations than the other models. Also, a vital feature of the ELM model is its ability to adapt to the potential changes in training and testing data ratio. To summarize, the results reported in this study demonstrated an efficient method for selecting the optimal dataset ratios and the best AI model to predict properly which would be helpful in the design of an accurate model for solving different environmental issues.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Al-Samarrai, Shatha Y.
    et al.
    Chemistry Department, College of Science, Tikrit University, Tikrit 34001, Iraq.
    Karaghool, Haneen A. Kh
    Environmental Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Tikrit University, Tikrit 34001, Iraq.
    Abdulridha, Ali
    Civil Engineering Department, College of Engineering, University of Warith Al-Anbiyaa, Karbala 56001, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Salman, Jasim M.
    Department of Biology, College of Science, University of Babylon, Hillah 51001, Iraq.
    Al-Sareji, Osamah J.
    Sustainability Solutions Research Lab, Faculty of Engineering, University of Pannonia, Egyetem Str. 10, 8200 Veszprém, Hungary.
    Minimizing the Fluoride Load in Water Using the Electrocoagulation Method: An Experimental Approach2022In: Environments, E-ISSN 2076-3298, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The abundant presence of fluoride (F-) in surface water bodies is an environmental concern because of its effects on human health; medical reports confirmed that fluoride intake above 1.5 mg/L leads to many health complications, including but not limited to weak bones and enamel fluorosis. Thus, the World Health Organisation (WHO) defines 1.20 mg/L as the maximum permissible F concentration in drinking water. The electrocoagulation method (EC) is globally practised to remove many pollutants from water due to its cost-effectiveness, safety, and ease of use. However, EC has some drawbacks, such as the lack of reactors’ design. In this study, a new EC reactor, which uses four drilled aluminium electrodes and a variant cross-section section container, was designed and used to remove F- from water. The design of the new EC eliminated the need for water mixers. The ability of the new EC unit to remove F- from synthetic water was evaluated at different current densities (CD) (1-3 mA/cm2), electrode distances (ELD) (5-15 mm), pH of the solution (pHoS) (4-10), and initial F- concentrations (IFC) (5-20 mg/L). The outcomes of this study prove that the new reactor could remove as much as 98.3% of 20 mg/l of F- at CD, ELD, pHoS, and IFC of 2 mA/cm2, 5 mm, and 4 and 10 mg/L, respectively.

  • 8.
    Amirah Hamzah, Hamizah
    et al.
    Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
    Kadhum, Safaa A
    Department of Environment, College of Science, University of Al Qadisiyah, Al-Qadisiyah 58001, Iraq.
    Zahmir Zulkifli, Syaizwan
    Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
    Ali Abed, Salwan
    Department of Environment, College of Science, University of Al Qadisiyah, Al-Qadisiyah 58001, Iraq.
    Awad, Ahmed
    Department of Environment, College of Science, University of Al Qadisiyah, Al-Qadisiyah 58001, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Heavy metal speciation in surface sediments and their impact on the bioaccumulation of green mussels (Perna viridis) from the eastern part of the Straits of Johor, Malaysia2023In: Total Environment Research Themes, ISSN 2772-8099, Vol. 7, article id 100064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many aquatic ecosystems are vulnerable to many pollutants, particularly heavy metals that are now a threat to public health. It may be more effective to manage pollution in waterways if we can better understand the connection between heavy metals in sediments and their accumulation in green mussels. In this study, lead levels in green mussels (Perna viridis) were above the permissible maximum level (WHO, Malaysia Food Regulation, and the FAO). Moreover, zinc levels exceeded the FAO's maximum recommended range. The fractionate of heavy metals in surface sediment from the eastern part of the Johore Straits was investigated using the sequential extraction techniques (SET) method. In the majority of sampling stations, copper's chemical speciation followed the following order: residual > oxidisable-organic > exchangeable > acid reducible, while zinc's and lead's chemical speciation followed the following pattern: residual > oxidisable-organic > acid reducible > exchangeable. The results of Pearson's correlation studies demonstrated a substantial association between Zn concentration in the tissues of green mussels and total Zinc, exchangeable (F1), acid-reducible (F2), and residual (F4) Zn in surface sediment. Green mussel Cu content and surface sediment Cu of exchangeable (F1), residual (F4), and total Cu were found to correlate. As a result, green mussels are being used as a biomonitoring agent for heavy metal contamination on the eastern side of the Straits of Johor in Malaysia.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adom, Philip Kofi
    Department of Banking and Finance, University of Professional Studies, Accra, Ghana.
    Quality of institution and the FEG (forest, energy intensity, and globalization) -environment relationships in sub-Saharan Africa2017In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 24, no 21, p. 17455-17473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current share of sub-Saharan Africa in global carbon dioxide emissions is negligible compared to major contributors like Asia, Americas, and Europe. This trend is, however, likely to change given that both economic growth and rate of urbanization in the region are projected to be robust in the future. The current study contributes to the literature by examining both the direct and the indirect impacts of quality of institution on the environment. Specifically, we investigate whether the institutional setting in the region provides some sort of a complementary role in the environment-FEG relationships. We use the panel two-step system generalized method of moments (GMM) technique to deal with the simultaneity problem. Data consists of 43 sub-Saharan African countries. The result shows that energy inefficiency compromises environmental standards. However, the quality of the institutional setting helps moderate this negative consequences; countries with good institutions show greater prospects than countries with poor institutions. On the other hand, globalization of the region and increased forest size generate positive environmental outcomes in the region. Their impacts are, however, independent of the quality of institution. Afforestation programs, promotion of other clean energy types, and investment in energy efficiency, basic city infrastructure, and regulatory and institutional structures, are desirable policies to pursue to safeguard the environment.

  • 10.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Marbuah, George
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mubanga, Mwenya
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Climate variability and infectious diseases nexus: Evidence from Sweden2017In: Infectious Disease Modelling, ISSN 2468-0427, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 203-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies on the link between climate variability and infectious diseases are based on biophysical experiments, do not account for socio-economic factors and with little focus on developed countries. This study examines the effect of climate variability and socio-economic variables on infectious diseases using data from all 21 Swedish counties. Employing static and dynamic modelling frameworks, we observe that temperature has a linear negative effect on the number of patients. The relationship between winter temperature and the number of patients is non-linear and “U” shaped in the static model. Conversely, a positive effect of precipitation on the number of patients is found, with modest heterogeneity in the effect of climate variables on the number of patients across disease classifications observed. The effect of education and number of health personnel explain the number of patients in a similar direction (negative), while population density and immigration drive up reported cases. Income explains this phenomenon non-linearly. In the dynamic setting, we found significant persistence in the number of infectious and parasitic-diseased patients, with temperature and income observed as the only significant drivers.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Emelie
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Jobs, Marit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Lagerkvist, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Elfgren, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Biogeochemical and mechanical characterization of the landfill fraction generated by mechanical waste sorting2021In: Detritus, ISSN 2611-4127, Vol. 15, p. 120-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the resource recovery from mixed waste streams are performed, new mixed waste streams are generated. Some of these waste streams does not fit well to existing waste management options, for example, they may hold a to low heating value to sustain combustion and they may have a too high carbon content to be accepted at non-hazardous landfills. Also various health and pollution risks may arise as well as practical handling issues due to the physical properties of such wastes. One such waste is the under sieve fraction generated when recovering metals and fuel from mixed waste streams using mechanical and magnetic separation tools. Such mechanical sorting is typically used for mixed wastes of different properties and particle sizes, such as houshold bulky wastes, construction and demolition waste, and at landfill mining materials. In this work, we examine the properties of one case of mechanical sorting of bulky wastes, including construction and demolition wastes. We analyse a broad spectrum of chemical, physical, and mechanical properties as well as some biological. Based on the data we develop recommendations for landfilling, what potential problems might arise and how to counteract them.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Ahonen-Jonnarth, Ulla
    Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Mattias
    Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Marsh, John Everett
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation. School of Psychology and Computer Science, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Bökman, Fredrik
    Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    What Influences People’s Tradeoff Decisions Between CO2 Emissions and Travel Time? An Experiment With Anchors and Normative Messages2021In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 702398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the today’s greatest challenges is to adjust our behavior so that we can avoid a major climate disaster. To do so, we must make sacrifices for the sake of the environment. The study reported here investigates how anchors (extrinsic motivational-free information) and normative messages (extrinsic motivational information) influence people’s tradeoffs between travel time and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the context of car travel and whether any interactions with environmental concern (an intrinsic motivational factor) can be observed. In this study, people received either a CO2, health or no normative message together with either a high anchor, a low anchor, or no anchor. People that received both a high anchor and a CO2 emission normative message were willing to travel for a longer time than those that only received a high anchor. If a low anchor was presented, no differences in willingness to travel for a longer time were found between the three different conditions of normative message groups, i.e., CO2 normative message, health normative message, or no normative message. People with higher concern for the environment were found to be willing to travel for a longer time than those with lower concern for the environment. Further, this effect was strongest when a high anchor was presented. These results suggest that anchors and normative messages are among the many factors that can influence people’s tradeoffs between CO2 emission and travel time, and that various factors may have to be combined to increase their influence over pro-environmental behavior and decisions.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Jasmine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Investigation of carbon capture technologies for Sävenäs waste-to-energy plant2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 300 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon capture technologies have the potential to decarbonize the emissions to air from the heat and power sector and contribute to the necessary greenhouse gas emission mitigation in order to meet the Paris Agreement requirements. The energy requirement and ability to retrofit carbon capture units are crucial to convert existing power plants into more environmental benign processes to meet the Swedish national goal of greenhouse gas neutrality at 2045. This report investigates the viability of carbon capture technologies at waste-to-energy (WTE) plants with a techno-economic analysis of the Sävenäs WTE plant in Gothenburg. Flue gas characteristics at WTE plants, with a carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration of ~10%, facilitates absorption techniques for post-combustion capturing which offers a high level of readiness and large-scale operations compared to other capture technologies.  

    To assess the feasibility of the carbon capture options, multicriteria aspects were considered covering energy requirement, environmental impact as well as economic advantages and disadvantages associated with CO2 emission abatement and loss of income due to energy withdrawal. Mass and energy balance calculations were executed based on steady-state assumptions and conservation of mass and energy in order to develop process models for carbon capture and thus expose process integration possibilities and the energy recovery potential. The balance calculations were performed for Monoethanolamine (MEA) and Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) as they were the most promising absorption technologies at the time of this master thesis project.

    The calculations show that the energy efficiency at Sävenäs WTE plant is reduced by 32% using MEA solution on a yearly average. However, extensive energy recovery would be achieved by integrating a heat-pump to the treatment process combined with district heating integration. With this integration the energy efficiency was reduce only by 12%. Energy penalty associated with CAP was found to reduce the efficiency by 21%. Energy recovery solutions are primarily derived from district heating integration which result in a net energy efficiency reduction by 10%.

    Due to its location in Sweden the demand of heat produced at Sävenäs WTE plant is at its highest between October and March. The CO2 emission abatement and cost analysis showed that a carbon capture facility is preferable operating during summertime when most of the about 1.5 TWh heat distributed per year from Sävenäs WTE plant won’t have to be replaced with other less environmental benign and energy efficient sources. If captured biogenic CO2 is considered a negative emission, then the WTE plant would achieve carbon neutrality even by operating only six months per year due to the high fraction of biogenic content in the fuel mixture.        

    The process model for CAP revealed extensive water utilization to avoid ammonia slip and thus additional energy requirements associated with cooling. The flue gas treatment characteristics at Sävenäs WTE plant corresponds well with the specifications for CAP but nonetheless the location of the WTE plant does not offer a natural source of cooling water with a preferable temperature of 5ºC. Hence, MEA was found to be the most viable option for Sävenäs WTE plant with a high technological readiness and seasonal operation already proven feasible at large pilot-scale plants.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Angelstam, Per
    et al.
    SLU.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    Örebro.
    Rönnbäck, Britt-Inger
    Östman, Anders
    Lazdinis, Marius
    SLU.
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    SLU.
    Arnberg, W.
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro.
    Two-dimensional Gap Analysis: A Tool for Efficient Conservation Planning and Biodiversity Policy Implementation2003In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 527-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maintenance of biodiversity by securing representative and well-connected habitat networks in managed landscapes requires a wise combination of protection, management, and restoration of habitats at several scales. We suggest that the integration of natural and social sciences in the form of "Two-dimensional gap analysis" is an efficient tool for the implementation of biodiversity policies. The tool links biologically relevant "horizontal" ecological issues with "vertical" issues related to institutions and other societal issues. Using forest biodiversity as an example, we illustrate how one can combine ecological and institutional aspects of biodiversity conservation, thus facilitating environmentally sustainable regional development. In particular, we use regional gap analysis for identification of focal forest types, habitat modelling for ascertaining the functional connectivity of "green infrastructures", as tools for the horizontal gap analysis. For the vertical dimension we suggest how the social sciences can be used for assessing the success in the implementation of biodiversity policies in real landscapes by identifying institutional obstacles while implementing policies. We argue that this interdisciplinary approach could be applied in a whole range of other environments including other terrestrial biota and aquatic ecosystems where functional habitat connectivity, nonlinear response to habitat loss and a multitude of economic and social interests co-occur in the same landscape.

  • 15.
    Augustsson, A.
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Lundgren, M.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Qvarforth, A.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Engström, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Laboratory Group, ALS Scandinavia AB, Luleå, Sweden.
    Paulukat, Cora
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Laboratory Group, ALS Scandinavia AB, Luleå, Sweden.
    Moreno-Jimenez, E.
    Department of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Beesley, L.
    School of Science, Engineering and Environment, Peel Building, University of Salford, Manchester M5 4WT, UK; Department of Environmental Geosciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Czech Republic.
    Trakal, L.
    Department of Environmental Geosciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Czech Republic.
    Hough, R. L.
    The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, UK.
    Urban vegetable contamination - The role of adhering particles and their significance for human exposure2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 900, article id 165633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While urban-grown vegetables could help combat future food insecurity, the elevated levels of toxic metals in urban soils need to be met with measures that minimise transfer to crops. The study firstly examines soil/dust particle inclusion in leafy vegetables and its contribution to vegetable metals (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn), using vegetable, soil and dust data from an open-field urban farm in southeastern Sweden. Titanium concentrations were used to assess soil/dust adherence. Results showed that vegetables contained 0.05–1.3 wt% of adhering particles (AP) even after washing. With 0.5 % AP, an adult with an average intake of vegetables could ingest approximately 100mg of particles per day, highlighting leafy vegetables as a major route for soil/dust ingestion. The presence of adhering particles also significantly contributed to the vegetable concentrations of As (9-20%), Co (17-20%), Pb (25-29%), and Cr (33-34%). Secondly, data from an indoor experiment was used to characterise root metal uptake from 20 urban soils from Sweden, Denmark, Spain, the UK, and the Czech Republic. Combining particle adherence and root uptake data, vegetable metal concentrations were calculated for the 20 urban soils to represent hypothetical field scenarios for these. Subsequently, average daily doses were assessed for vegetable consumers (adults and 3-6 year old children), distinguishing between doses from adhering particles and root uptake. Risks were evaluated from hazard quotients (HQs; average daily doses/tolerable intakes). Lead was found to pose the greatest risk, where particle ingestion often resulted in HQs>1 across all assessed scenarios. In summary, since washing was shown to remove only a portion of adhering metal-laden soil/dust particles from leafy vegetation, farmers and urban planners need to consider that measures to limit particle deposition are equally important as cultivating in uncontaminated soil.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Augustsson, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Qvarforth, Anna
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Hough, Rupert
    The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK.
    Engström, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Laboratory Group, ALS Scandinavia AB, Luleå, Sweden.
    Paulukat, Cora
    Division of Geosciences and Environmental Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Laboratory Group, ALS Scandinavia AB, Luleå, Sweden.
    Managing health risks in urban agriculture: The effect of vegetable washing for reducing exposure to metal contaminants2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 863, article id 160996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common, yet poorly evaluated, advice to remove contaminants from urban vegetables is to wash the produce before consumption. This study is based on 63 samples of chard, kale, lettuce and parsley that have grown near a heavily trafficked road in the third largest city in Sweden, with one portion of each sample being analysed without first being washed, and the other portion being subjected to common household washing. Concentrations of 71 elements were analysed by ICP-SFMS after a sample digestion that dissolves both the plant tissues and all potentially adhering particles. The results show that the washing effect, or the fraction removed upon washing, varies significantly between elements: from approximately 0 % for K to 68 % for the ∑REEs. Considering traditional metal contaminants, the efficiency decreased from Pb (on average 56 % lost) to Co (56 %) > Cr (55 %) > As (45 %) > Sb (35 %) > Ni (33 %) > Cu (13 %) > Zn (7 %) > Cd (7 %), and Ba (5 %). A clear negative correlation between the washing effect and the different elements' bioconcentration factors shows that the elements' accessibility for plant uptake is a key controlling factor for the degree to which they are removed upon washing. Based on the average washing efficiencies seen in this study, the average daily intake of Pb would increase by 130 % if vegetables are not washed prior to consumption. For the other contaminant metals this increase corresponds to 126 % (Co), 121 % (Cr), 82 % (As), 55 % (Sb), 50 % (Ni), 16 % (Cu), 8 % (Zn), 7 % (Cd) and 5 % (Ba). The advice to wash vegetables is therefore, for many elements, highly motivated for reducing exposure and health risks. For elements which are only slightly reduced when the vegetables are washed, however, advising should rather focus on reducing levels of contamination in the soil itself.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Rosqvist, Gunhild
    Department of Physical Geography, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    When Mines Go Silent: Exploring the Afterlives of Extraction Sites2021In: Nordic Perspectives on the Responsible Development of the Arctic: Pathways to Action / [ed] Nord, Douglas, Springer International Publishing , 2021, p. 349-367Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the characteristics of extractive industries, in the Arctic and elsewhere, is their sensitivity to fluctuations on world markets. When demand and prices are high companies expand operations and when they fall, companies tend to close extraction sites. Moreover, no ore body lasts forever. De-industrialisation poses particular challenges to communities in the Arctic, where distances are great, alternative economies few and where the environmental and social imprints of mining often are significant. How can communities that were developed based on extraction transition to post-extraction futures? This is a key question to pose when exploring how to achieve responsible development in the Arctic. This book chapter presents research within REXSAC exploring how mining communities in the Nordic Arctic has dealt with legacies of past mining operations and under which circumstances such legacies have been ascribed new values after extraction has ended. REXSAC has dealt with this research problem in an interdisciplinary way, combining methods and approaches from humanities, social- and natural sciences. The chapter will focus on this process of research and how it has generated insights in to three main post-extraction processes: environmental remediation, heritage making and re-economization.

  • 18.
    Bachi, Oum Elkheir
    et al.
    Laboratory of Saharan Bio-Resources: Preservation and Valorization (BRS), University Kasdi Merbah, Ouargla 30000, Algeria; Agricultural Development Commission in the Saharan Regions (CDARS), Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Halilat, Mohammed Tahar
    Laboratory of Saharan Bio-Resources: Preservation and Valorization (BRS), University Kasdi Merbah, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Bissati, Samia
    Laboratory of Saharan Bio-Resources: Preservation and Valorization (BRS), University Kasdi Merbah, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Saggai, Sofiane
    Laboratory of Water and Environment Engineering in Sahara Milieu (GEEMS), University of Kasdi Merbah, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Kouadri, Saber
    Laboratory of Water and Environment Engineering in Sahara Milieu (GEEMS), University of Kasdi Merbah, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Najm, Hadee Mohammed
    Department of Civil Engineering, Zakir Husain Engineering College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, India.
    Wastewater Treatment Performance of Aerated Lagoons, Activated Sludge and Constructed Wetlands under an Arid Algerian Climate2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 24, article id 16503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water pollution reduces the availability of fresh water, especially in arid areas suffering from water stress, and also adversely affects soil, vegetation and environmental processes. Wastewater treatment processes aim to reduce environmental degradation and increase water availability by improving the quality of wastewater to a standard suitable for irrigation. This paper compares the performance of three wastewater treatment processes: (i) aerated lagoon (AL), (ii) activated sludge (AS), and (iii) constructed wetland (plant beds, PB) under the arid climate of Algeria. The statistical analysis focused on the comparison between the removal rates of the physical (SS) and biological pollution (BOD5 and COD) parameters in the three stations during 8 years of operation. Obtained results show that the maximum removal rates were observed in the AS process and the minimum were in the AL process. The comparison between the removal rates for a given parameter has shown that there is a significant difference between the AL process on the one hand and the AS and PB processes on the other hand. For the last two processes, AS and PB, there is a difference, but it is not statistically significant. For the values of the parameters of wastewater leaving the three systems, results showed that there is a seasonal variation in the average values of the parameters (temperature effect) and that with the exception of orthophosphate, the values recorded are, for the most part, below the values of Algerian discharge standards, WHO standards and FAO standards.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Backer, Sumina Namboorimadathil
    et al.
    Research Institute of Sciences and Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, United Arab Emirates.
    Bouaziz, Ines
    Research Institute of Sciences and Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, United Arab Emirates.
    Kallayi, Nabeela
    Department of Chemistry, India Institute of Technology Indore, Indore 453552, India.
    Thomas, Reny Thankam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Preethikumar, Gopika
    Functional Materials, Materials Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Thiruvananthapuram 695019, India; Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Ghaziabad 201002, India.
    Takriff, Mohd Sobri
    Research Institute of Sciences and Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, United Arab Emirates; Chemical and Water Desalination Engineering Program, College of Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, United Arab Emirates; Department of Chemical and Processing Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Malaysia; Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, United Arab Emirates.
    Laoui, Tahar
    Research Institute of Sciences and Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, United Arab Emirates; Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, United Arab Emirates.
    Atieh, Muataz Ali
    Research Institute of Sciences and Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, United Arab Emirates; Chemical and Water Desalination Engineering Program, College of Engineering, University of Sharjah, Sharjah P.O. Box 27272, United Arab Emirates.
    Review: Brine Solution: Current Status, Future Management and Technology Development2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 11, article id 6752Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Desalination brine is extremely concentrated saline water; it contains various salts, nutrients, heavy metals, organic contaminants, and microbial contaminants. Conventional disposal of desalination brine has negative impacts on natural and marine ecosystems that increase the levels of toxicity and salinity. These issues demand the development of brine management technologies that can lead to zero liquid discharge. Brine management can be productive by adopting economically feasible methodologies, which enables the recovery of valuable resources like freshwater, minerals, and energy. This review focuses on the recent advances in brine management using various membrane/thermal-based technologies and their applicability in water, mineral, and energy recoveries, considering their pros and cons. This review also exemplifies the hybrid processes for metal recovery and zero liquid discharge that may be adopted, so far, as an appropriate futuristic strategy. The data analyzed and outlook presented in this review could definitely contribute to the development of economically achievable future strategies for sustainable brine management.

  • 20.
    Ban, Jiaxing
    et al.
    School of Water Resource and Environmental, Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083, China; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, 999077, Hong Kong, China.
    Sun, Keke
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, 999077, Hong Kong, China.
    Yao, Jun
    School of Water Resource and Environmental, Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083, China.
    Sunahara, Geoffrey
    School of Water Resource and Environmental, Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083, China; Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H9X3V9, Canada.
    Hudson-Edwards, Karen
    Environment and Sustainability Institute and Camborne School of Mines, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK.
    Jordan, Gyozo
    Department of Applied Chemistry, Szent István University, Budapest, 1118, Hungary; State Key Laboratory for Environmental Geochemistry, China Academy of Sciences, Guizhou, 550081, China.
    Alakangas, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Ni, Wen
    State Key Laboratory of High-Efficient Mining and Safe of Metal Mines, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100083, China.
    Poon, Chi-Sun
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, 999077, Hong Kong, China.
    Advances in the use of recycled non-ferrous slag as a resource for non-ferrous metal mine site remediation2022In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 213, article id 113533Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing global demand for non-ferrous metals has led to serious environmental issues involving uncovered mine site slag dumps that threaten the surrounding soils, surface waters, groundwater, and the atmosphere. Remediation of these slags using substitute cement materials for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and precursors for alkali-activated materials (AAMs) can convert hazardous solid wastes into valuable construction materials, as well as to attain the desired solidification and stabilization (S/S) of heavy metal(loid)s (HM). This review discusses the current research on the effect of non-ferrous slags on the reaction mechanisms of the OPC and AAM. The S/S of HM from the non-ferrous slags in AAM and OPC is also reviewed. HM can be stabilized in these materials based on the complex salt effect and isomorphic effects. The major challenges faced in AAMs and OPC for HM stabilization include the long-term durability of the matrix (e.g., sulfate attack, stability of volume). The existing knowledge gaps and future trends for the sustainable application of non-ferrous slags are also discussed.

  • 21.
    Baumann, Henrikke
    et al.
    Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Böckin, Daniel
    Miljögiraff, 414 62 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Goffetti, Giulia
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milan, Italy.
    Tillman, Anne-Marie
    Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Zobel, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Switching the focus from product function to business profit: Introducing Business Model LCA (BM-LCA)2022In: Proceedings of LCM 2021: 10th International Conference on Life Cycle Management / [ed] S. Albrecht; M. Fischer; C. Scagnetti; M. Barkmeyer; A. Braune, EDP Sciences, 2022, article id 06004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen much interest in business models as vehicles towards sustainability, cf. [1]. Conventional LCA, however, fails to properly capture the environmental impacts of a business model. Here, we introduce the background and the principles of Business Model LCA, a new LCA methodology for the assessment of environmental performance of business models. Methodological innovations are based on an understanding of the difference and relatedness between product and business. The key innovation is that BM-LCA centres its analysis on the ’business model’ instead of the ’product function’ as in conventional LCA. This requires the functional unit to represent the business (e.g., as ‘profit per time unit’) and the need to couple the monetary flows of the business to the material and energy flows of the product system via a set of ’coupling’ equations. BM-LCA contributes to environmental business analysis and could open up a new avenue of research where LCA and business analysts collaborate on business model innovation for sustainability.

  • 22.
    Bhattacharjee, Shimantika
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Industrilized and sustainable construction.
    Mukherjee, Nandan
    Centre for Environmental Change and Human Resilience (CECHR), University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom.
    Floating houses: A design for flood resilience innovations in Bangladesh2017In: Proceedings of 33rd PLEA International Conference: Design to Thrive / [ed] Luisa Brotas; Sue Roaf; Fergus Nicol, Network for Comfort and Energy Use in Buildings (NCEUB) , 2017, Vol. 3, p. 5149-5156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People living in the coastal regions of Bangladesh suffer extremely due to floods. Every year 20% of the land mass (∼27,000 km2) and 30 million inhabitants are exposed to flooding that triggers casualties, infrastructural damage, and deprived access to basic needs. Many policies and strategies already exist for managing flood-related disasters. Flood-shelters save lives but rarely equipped with sufficient food, clean water, sanitation, and electricity. New strategies are required to provide resilience in flood prone areas. This conceptual paper presents an innovative and integrated approach for up-scaling and enhancement of resilience in the flood prone regions of Bangladesh. The paper shows a conceptual design for a floating house with six innovation techniques for self-sufficiency and durability. The techniques include wind and flood tolerant structure, vertical gardening, rainwater harvesting, poultry and bio-digester unit, cage fishing, and renewable energy implementation. The techniques are low-tech and cost-efficient. Use of locally available materials enhances the resilience before and after flood. The design presents equality, balance and immense opportunities for the inhabitants. The 3R strategy (reduce, reuse and recycle) is one of the fundamental concepts of this floating house design. The design explores the possibilities of food security, waste management and energy challenge.

  • 23.
    Böckin, Daniel
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Goffetti, Giulia
    University of Siena, Italy.
    Baumann, Henrikke
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tillman, Anne-Marie
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zobel, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Environmental assessment of two business models: A life cycle comparison between a sales and a rental business model in the apparel sector in Sweden2020Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Chen, Jingjing
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. State Key Laboratory of Material-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, 210009, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China.
    Risberg, Mikael
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Westerlund, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Jansson, Urban
    Boden Biogas Plant, Smidesvägen 3, 96138, Boden, Sweden.
    Wang, Changsong
    State Key Laboratory of Material-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, 210009, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China.
    Lu, Xiaohua
    State Key Laboratory of Material-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, 210009, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China.
    Ji, Xiaoyan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Heat-transfer performance of twisted tubes for highly viscous food waste slurry from biogas plants2022In: Biotechnology for Biofuels and Bioproducts, E-ISSN 2731-3654, Vol. 15, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of food waste as feedstock shows high production of biogas via anaerobic digestion, but requires efficient heat transfer in food waste slurry at heating and cooling processes. The lack of rheological properties hampered the research on the heat-transfer process for food waste slurry. Referentially, the twisted hexagonal and elliptical rubes have been proved as the optimal enhanced geometry for heat transfer of medium viscous slurries with non-Newtonian behavior and Newtonian fluids, respectively. It remains unknown whether improvements can be achieved by using twisted geometries in combination with food waste slurry in processes including heating and cooling.

    Results: Food waste slurry was observed to exhibit highly viscous, significant temperature-dependence, and strongly shear-thinning rheological characteristics. Experiments confirmed the heat-transfer enhancement of twisted hexagonal tubes for food waste slurry and validated the computational fluid dynamics-based simulations with an average deviation of 14.2%. Twisted hexagonal tubes were observed to be more effective at low-temperature differences and possess an enhancement factor of up to 2.75; while twisted elliptical tubes only exhibited limited heat-transfer enhancement at high Reynolds numbers. The heat-transfer enhancement achieved by twisted hexagonal tubes was attributed to the low dynamic viscosity in the boundary layer induced by the strong and continuous shear effect near the walls of the tube.

    Conclusions: This study determined the rheological properties of food waste slurry, confirmed the heat-transfer enhancement of the twisted hexagonal tubes experimentally and numerically, and revealed the mechanism of heat-transfer enhancement based on shear rate distributions.

  • 25.
    Chen, Xuanjing
    et al.
    College of Resources and Environment, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China, Water Systems and Global Change Group, Wageningen University & Research, PB, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
    Strokal, Maryna
    Water Systems and Global Change Group, Wageningen University & Research, PB, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
    Kroeze, Carolien
    Water Systems and Global Change Group, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
    Ma, Lin
    Key Laboratory of Agricultural Water Resources, Center for Agricultural Resources Research, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shijiazhuang, PR China.
    Shen, Zhenyao
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, PR China.
    Wu, Jiechen
    Key Lab of Plant-Soil Interaction, MOE, Center for Resources, Environment and Food Security, College of Resources. Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing, PR China.
    Chen, Xinping
    College of Resources and Environment, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China, Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China.
    Shi, Xiaojun
    College of Resources and Environment, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China, Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Southwest University, Tiansheng Road 02, Chongqing 400715, PR China.
    Seasonality in river export of nitrogen: A modelling approach for the Yangtze River2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 671, p. 1282-1283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In China, many estuaries suffer from eutrophication problems such as green tides and hypoxia. This is often a result of human activities on land leading to increased nutrient exports by rivers. River pollution shows seasonal trends that are not well understood. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to improve our understanding of the seasonal variation in river export of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) by source and at the sub-basin scale. To this end, we modified the existing MARINA model 1.0 (Model to Assess River Input of Nutrient to seAs) to account for seasonality in river export of DIN, and applied it to the Yangtze River. The resulting MARINA model version 1.1 takes a mass-balance approach and accounts for seasonality in human activities (e.g., crop planting and fertilization) and meteorology. The model distinguishes four seasons: winter (December–February), spring (March–May), summer (June–August) and fall (September–November). Our results for Yangtze indicate that N inputs to land and river export of DIN to sea are higher in summer and lower in winter. In spring, summer and fall, diffuse sources from agriculture contribute 43–85% to DIN export. In spring and fall, use of synthetic N fertilizers in cropland is an important source of DIN. In summer, both atmospheric N deposition and synthetic N fertilizers dominate. Animal manure is typically applied on land in spring and fall, contributing then to DIN. In winter, point sources of animal manure are responsible for 34–74% of DIN river export. In general, more DIN is exported to the sea from activities in middlestream and downstream sub-basins. Our results can serve as an example for other large rivers worldwide, and support the formulation of effective strategies to reduce seasonal eutrophication.

  • 26.
    Crampelle, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Återbruk av möbler och inredning i studentbostadsområden2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Every year bulky waste is stashed outside and around the waste rooms that could be reused if taken care of properly. The European Union has set the waste hierarchy to lead the society in a direction towards a more sustainable consumption and waste management. This master thesis is based on the wastefulness of natural resources and the possibilities to take care of them. The interest of reuse of furniture and furnishings within a community based on students from Luleå University of Technology has been researched. This has resulted in a guide for implementation of a reuse event, which was tried out in April 2017.

     

    It seems that students have potential to reuse more than they normally do, which has been confirmed through questioners and a case study. Fifty percent of the participating students have obtained furniture or furnishings during the last 12 months and just a small part of them has disposed of something through reuse facilities or websites during the same period. The majority showed interest for used goods and the main reason for this was economics.

     

    To sum up, there is potential for reuse methods that involve students of LTU which could save nature not only a lot of CO2 emissions but also i.e. eutrophication, acidification, water and chemicals. Which would have a positive impact on the environment.

     

    If the reuse event, tested for this thesis, is implemented it is recommended to invite a larger target group and arrange it in a more public space.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Daugela, Ignas
    et al.
    Department of Geodesy and Cadaster, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, 10223 Vilnius, Lithuania; Antanas Gustaitis’ Aviation Institute, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, 10223 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Suziedelyte Visockiene, Jurate
    Department of Geodesy and Cadaster, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Vilnius, 10223, Lithuania.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Suzdalev, Ivan
    Antanas Gustaitis’ Aviation Institute, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Vilnius, 10223, Lithuania.
    Measurements of flammable gas concentration in landfill areas with a low‐cost sensor2021In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 14, no 13, article id 3967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global warming, as the result of the negative impact of humans on climate change, has been observed based on various data sources. Various measures have aimed to reduce anthropogenic factors, and also to lower carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane CH4 emissions. One of the main contributors to anthropogenic factors is organic waste in municipal solid waste landfills. There are many landfills where cost‐effective rapid technologies for the identification and quantification of CH4 emission sites are not applied. There is still a need for the development of accessible and cost-effective methods that react in a real‐time manner for the rapid detection and monitoring of methane emissions. This paper’s main goal is to create a prototype sensor suitable for operational measurement of the gas value, suitable for integration into geodetic equipment or an unmanned aerial vehicle system. A sensor system (device) was developed, which consisted of three semiconductor sen-sors—MQ2, MQ4, and MQ135—which aimed to capture flammable gases (CO2, CH4, O2 purity) and to evaluate the averages of the measured values from the components mounted on the board—the semiconductor sensors. The sensors were calibrated in a laboratory and tested in a closed landfill. The measurement data consisted of the read resistances (analog signal) from the MQ2, MQ4, and MQ135 sensors, and the relative humidity and the temperature (digital signal) of the DHT2 sensor with a timestamp calculated by the RTC module. The use of the method was confirmed because the sensors reacted as expected when placed in the vicinity of the gas collection well. Furthermore, the sensor will be tested and improved for field work in landfill sites.

  • 28.
    Dixit, Rishibha
    et al.
    Rani Durgavati Univ, Dept PG Studies & Res Biol Sci, Algal Biotechnol Lab, Jabalpur 482001, India.
    Singh, Surendra
    Rani Durgavati Univ, Dept PG Studies & Res Biol Sci, Algal Biotechnol Lab, Jabalpur 482001, India.
    Enamala, Manoj Kumar
    Bioserve Biotechnol India Private Ltd, Unit D4-7,1st Floor,Ind Estate, Hyderabad 500040, India.
    Patel, Alok
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Effect of Various Growth Medium on the Physiology and De Novo Lipogenesis of a Freshwater Microalga Scenedesmus rotundus-MG910488 under Autotrophic Condition2022In: Clean Technologies, E-ISSN 2571-8797, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 733-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The microalga Scenedesmus rotundus, isolated from Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India was designated as Scenedesmus rotundus-MG910488 after morphological and molecular identification. In this study, the effects of various autotrophic growth media on the physiology and lipid accumulation of this microalga were investigated. The cell density, amount of photosynthetic pigments, the productivity of biomass and lipid content and the cell morphology of the microalga were shown to be significantly affected by the variation in growth media. The highest biomass of 754.56 +/- 14.80 mg L-1 with biomass productivity of 37.73 +/- 0.74 mg L(-1)day(-1) was achieved when this microalgae was cultivated in the Zarrouk's medium, whereas the highest lipid content of 33.30 +/- 1.21% was observed in the BG-11 medium. The results confirm that the BG-11 is a cost-effective and efficient growth medium for this microalga. It also shows that the ingredients of the growth medium and its concentration influence the growth and synthesis of biomolecules produced by microalga. The biodiesel produced from obtained lipids was qualitatively estimated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H-1, C-13 NMR) and Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), which indicate the presence of oleic acid methyl ester, linoleic acid methyl ester and palmitic acid methyl ester as the leading fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) in the samples, which make this strain an ideal feedstock for biodiesel production.

  • 29.
    Drielsma, Johannes A.
    et al.
    European Association of Mining Industries, Metal Ores and Industrial Minerals (Euromines), Avenue de Broqueville/Broquevillelaan 12, Brussels, Belgium.
    Allington, Ruth
    Committee for Mineral Reserves International Reporting Standards (CRIRSCO), Pan-European Reserves and Resources Reporting Committee (PERC), EFG Office, Service Géologique de Belgiqu, Rue Jenner 13, Brussels, Belgium.
    Brady, Thomas
    Newmont Mining, 6363 South Fiddler's Green Circle Suite 800, Greenwood Village, United States.
    Guinée, Jeroen
    Institute of Environmental Sciences CML, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 2, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Hammarstrom, Jane
    United States Geological Survey (USGS), 954 National Center, Reston, United States.
    Hummen, Torsten
    Competence Center Sustainability and Infrastructure Systems, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI, Breslauer Straße 48, Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Russell-Vaccari, Andrea
    Align Consulting, 1134 Cross Creek Ct., Sheridan, United States.
    Schneider, Laura
    Econsense-Forum for Sustainable Development of German Business, Oberwallstraße 24, Berlin, Germany.
    Sonnemann, Guido
    The Life Cycle Group CyVi Institut des Sciences Moléculaires (ISM), Université de Bordeaux 1-UMR 5255 CNRS, 351 Cours de la libération-Bât A12, Talence cedex, France.
    Weihed, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Abiotic raw-materials in life cycle impact assessments: An emerging consensus across disciplines2016In: Resources, E-ISSN 2079-9276, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper captures some of the emerging consensus points that came out of the workshop "Mineral Resources in Life Cycle Impact Assessment: Mapping the path forward", held at the Natural History Museum London on 14 October 2015: that current practices rely in many instances on obsolete data, often confuse resource depletion with impacts on resource availability, which can therefore provide inconsistent decision support and lead to misguided claims about environmental performance. Participants agreed it would be helpful to clarify which models estimate depletion and which estimate availability, so that results can be correctly reported in the most appropriate framework. Most participants suggested that resource availability will be more meaningfully addressed within a comprehensive Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment framework rather than limited to an environmental Life Cycle Assessment or Footprint. Presentations from each of the authors are available for download [1].

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Dublet-Adli, Gabrielle
    et al.
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, 0806, Norway.
    Cornelissen, Gerard
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, 0806, Norway; Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, 1433, Norway.
    Eek, Espen
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, 0806, Norway.
    Sørmo, Erlend
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, 0806, Norway; Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, 1433, Norway.
    Hansen, Caroline Berge
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, 0806, Norway.
    Tjønneland, Maren Valestrand
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, 0806, Norway.
    Maurice, Christian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    A trade-off in activated biochar capping of complex sediment contamination: reduced PAH transport at the cost of potential As mobilisation2023In: Journal of Soils and Sediments, ISSN 1439-0108, E-ISSN 1614-7480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The effect of thin-layer capping with activated biochar on sediment-to-water flux was investigated. For the first time, the diffusion of both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and arsenic (As) were studied simultaneously. The fate of As was investigated, under successive dysoxic and oxic conditions, in order to assess and discuss potential trade-off effects when using biochar as an active sorbent for capping of multi-contaminated sediments. Methods: Sediments from the Bureå bay (Sweden), contaminated with PAH and metal elements including As and Hg, were capped with activated biochar and/or bentonite in simple microcosm test systems in the laboratory. The contaminant transport from sediment through the capping to water body was studied by sampling metals in the water phase above the cap over time, or PAH in a heptane layer over water, at regular time intervals. Results: Consistently with the limited previous studies, reductions were observed (e.g., 60–65% for 15-PAH, 100% for chrysene) in sediment-to-water PAH fluxes upon biochar-based thin-layer capping. However, the most important novel finding revealed ambiguous effects of biochar capping on redox-sensitive elements, in particular As. Under the microcosm conditions of the experiment, where pH was affected by the capping material, biochar treatments favoured As mobility under oxic conditions, directly and/or via effects on Fe speciation. While capping limited the diffusion of As under dysoxic conditions, this also favoured greater As mobility under oxic water conditions compared to no capping. Conclusion: Design and monitoring of capping of PAH contaminated sediments should account for potential negative effects on co-occurring contaminants.

  • 31.
    Edgren, Aina
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, SE-41296, Sweden; Kanthal AB, Halstahammar, SE-73427, Sweden.
    Ström, Erik
    Kanthal AB, Halstahammar, SE-73427, Sweden.
    Qiu, Ren
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, SE-41296, Sweden.
    Frisk, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Hörnqvist Colliander, Magnus
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, SE-41296, Sweden.
    High temperature deformation of polycrystalline C40 Mo(Si,Al)22022In: Materials Science & Engineering: A, ISSN 0921-5093, E-ISSN 1873-4936, Vol. 849, article id 143387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycrystalline Mo(Si,Al) with C40 crystal structure was deformed in compression with a strain rate of 10−4 s−1 at 1300 °C. The specimens were deformed to a strain of 10%–15% and showed maximum stresses around 150 MPa prior to pronounced softening. No crack formation or significant increase in porosity could be observed. Post-test microstructure analysis revealed that the material was inhomogeneously deformed on both inter- and intragranular levels. Dynamic recrystallization occurred alongside low angle grain boundary formation in highly deformed grains. Furthermore, complex intragranular deformation fields suggest that slip systems other than ⟨2̄1̄10⟩ [0001] may be active during deformation.

  • 32.
    Ethaib, Saleem
    et al.
    Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Thi-Qar, Al-Nassiriya 64001, Iraq.
    Al-Qutaifia, Sarah
    Department of Reconstruction & Projects, The University of Thi-Qar, Al-Nassiriya 64001, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Zubaidi, Salah L.
    Department of Civil Engineering, Wasit University, Wasit 52001, Iraq.
    Function of Nanomaterials in Removing Heavy Metals for Water and Wastewater Remediation: A Review2022In: Environments, E-ISSN 2076-3298, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 123Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although heavy metals are typically found in trace levels in natural waterways, most of them are hazardous to human health and the environment, even at extremely low concentrations. Nanotechnology and nanomaterials have gained great attention among researchers as a sustainable route to addressing water pollution. Researchers focus on developing novel nanomaterials that are cost-effective for use in water/wastewater remediation. A wide range of adsorbed nanomaterials have been fabricated based on different forms of natural materials, such as carbonaceous nanomaterials, zeolite, natural polymers, magnetic materials, metal oxides, metallic materials, and silica. Hence, this review set out to address the ability of various synthesized nanoadsorbent materials to remove different heavy metal ions from water and wastewater and to investigate the influence of the functionalization of nanomaterials on their adsorption capacity and separation process. Additionally, the effect of experimental variables, such as pH, initial ion concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time, temperature, and ionic strength, on the removal of metal ions has been discussed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Ferreira, José
    et al.
    Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society (CERNAS), Instituto Politécnico De Viseu, Campus Politécnico De Repeses, Viseu, Portugal.
    Jones, Dennis
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Esteves, Bruno
    Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society (CERNAS), Instituto Politécnico De Viseu, Campus Politécnico De Repeses, Viseu, Portugal.
    Cruz-Lopes, Luisa
    Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society (CERNAS), Instituto Politécnico De Viseu, Campus Politécnico De Repeses, Viseu, Portugal.
    Pereira, Helena
    Forest Research Centre, School of Agriculture, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Domingos, Idalina
    Research Center for Natural Resources, Environment and Society (CERNAS), Instituto Politécnico De Viseu, Campus Politécnico De Repeses, Viseu, Portugal.
    Life Cycle Assessment of Maritime Pine Wood: A Portuguese Case Study2021In: Journal of Sustainable Forestry, ISSN 1054-9811, E-ISSN 1540-756X, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 431-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life Cycle Assessment has become one of the most recognized and internationally accepted method for examining the environmental performance of forest products and processes. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental impact associated with different commercial outputs of maritime pine wood (round, industrial, and residual) produced in the Portuguese forest under natural regeneration. Identifying the hotspots in the life cycle (cradle-to-gate) of each sort of maritime pine was another objective of the study. SimaPro software was used for this study, whilst the CML-IA (baseline) method was chosen to assess the environmental impacts. The study showed that round wood presented the highest values in all impact categories and industrial wood presented the lowest values except in photochemical oxidation where residual wood was the best co-product when economic allocation is chosen. The major hot spots appeared to be the felling and hauling processes due to fossil fuel combustion in the chainsaw and forwarder, respectively. The co-product that should be more environmentally friendly considerably depends on the allocation procedure chosen.

  • 34.
    Forward, Sonja
    et al.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Mobilitet, aktörer och planering, MAP.
    Nyberg, Jonna
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Mobilitet, aktörer och planering, MAP.
    Forsberg, Inger
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Mobilitet, aktörer och planering, MAP.
    Nordström, Mattias
    Sweco, Sweden.
    Wallmark, Cecilia
    Sweco, Sweden.
    Wiberg, Erik
    Vätgas Sverige.
    Wolf, Sven
    Inflow Consulting AB.
    Förnybara drivmedel: möjligheter och hinder sett utifrån privatbilisters och aktörers perspektiv2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This project included three different studies with a view to providing an in-depth understanding of user needs and attitudes to alternative fuels and vehicles, such as: battery electric vehicles, hydrogen vehicles and cars using biogas. In addition the studies also examine attitudes to cars in general and climate change as well as exploring likely prospects for such cars in the future. The studies used three different methods; focus group, survey and interviews. The focus groups included six people, the survey 487 randomly selected road users and the interview study nine different stakeholders from government agencies, industry, branch organizations and the media. The results show that when purchasing a car safety and reliability are more important than the emission of CO2. The perception of cars powered by alternative fuels (electric, fuel cell, biogas), does not differ markedly. The price people are willing to pay for such a car is significantly lower than what these cars cost at present. In general, it could be argued that consumers want a car powered by alternative fuels to be similar or better than, a conventional car. The interview study also shows that politicians have an important role to play in the development of alternative fuels and the related infrastructure. According to the interviewees, the biggest challenge is not the technology, but rather how to provide an infrastructure for these vehicles. The industry is an important player who is willing to invest if the business can be profitable. Long-term is a keyword and is mentioned both in terms of policy instruments and information dissemination. In the latter case, since studies show that there are large gaps in the overall knowledge and understanding by the general public as well as considerable distrust of information presently available. Finally, the results also shows the need for a holistic approach where the focus is not only on fuel, but also on the development of attractive and accessible cities which reduce transport demand and provide for increased transport efficiency.

  • 35.
    Fraenkel, Elina
    et al.
    Tyréns AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Zobel, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The Importance of Customer Communication for Sustainable Consumption in the Outdoor Apparel Sector2022In: Proceeding of the 28th Annual Conference, International Sustainable Development Research Society: Sustainable Development and Courage: Culture, Art and Human Rights / [ed] Peter Dobers; Malin Gawell; Johan Gärde; Stefan Silfverskiöld, Södertörns högskola, 2022, p. 863-863Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Fuchs, Boris
    et al.
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, 2480 Koppang, Norway.
    Joly, Kyle
    National Park Service, Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, 99709 Fairbanks, Alaska, USA.
    Hilderbrand, Grant V.
    National Park Service, Alaska Regional Office, 99501 Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
    Evans, Alina L.
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, 2480 Koppang, Norway.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Scandinavia AB, 97187, Luleå, Sweden.
    Mangipane, Lindsey S.
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Marine Mammals Management, 99503 Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
    Mangipane, Buck A.
    Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, National Park Service, 99501 Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
    Gustine, David D.
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Marine Mammals Management, 99503 Anchorage, Alaska, USA.
    Zedrosser, Andreas
    Department of Natural Science and Environmental Health, University of South-Eastern Norway, 3800 Boe in Telemark, Norway; Institute for Wildlife Biology and Game Management, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, 1180 Vienna, Austria.
    Brown, Ludovick
    Departement de biologie, Universite de Sherbrooke, J1K 2R1 Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
    Arnemo, Jon M.
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, 2480 Koppang, Norway; Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83, Umeå, Sweden.
    Toxic elements in arctic and sub-arctic brown bears: Blood concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in relation to diet, age, and human footprint2023In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 229, article id 115952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contamination with arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) is a global concern impairing resilience of organisms and ecosystems. Proximity to emission sources increases exposure risk but remoteness does not alleviate it. These toxic elements are transported in atmospheric and oceanic pathways and accumulate in organisms. Mercury accumulates in higher trophic levels. Brown bears (Ursus arctos), which often live in remote areas, are long-lived omnivores, feeding on salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and berries (Vaccinium spp.), resources also consumed by humans.

    We measured blood concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in bears (n = 72) four years and older in Scandinavia and three national parks in Alaska, USA (Lake Clark, Katmai and Gates of the Arctic) using high-resolution, inductively-coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. Age and sex of the bears, as well as the typical population level diet was associated with blood element concentrations using generalized linear regression models.

    Alaskan bears consuming salmon had higher Hg blood concentrations compared to Scandinavian bears feeding on berries, ants (Formica spp.) and moose (Alces). Cadmium and Pb blood concentrations were higher in Scandinavian bears than in Alaskan bears. Bears using marine food sources, in addition to salmon in Katmai, had higher As blood concentrations than bears in Scandinavia. Blood concentrations of Cd and Pb, as well as for As in female bears increased with age. Arsenic in males and Hg concentrations decreased with age.

    We detected elevated levels of toxic elements in bears from landscapes that are among the most pristine on the planet. Sources are unknown but anthropogenic emissions are most likely involved. All study areas face upcoming change: Increasing tourism and mining in Alaska and more intensive forestry in Scandinavia, combined with global climate change in both regions. Baseline contaminant concentrations as presented here are important knowledge in our changing world.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Garbis, Zoe
    et al.
    George Washington University, Washington, D.C., USA.
    McCarthy, Erin
    George Washington University, Washington, D.C., USA.
    Orttung, Robert W.
    George Washington University, Washington, D.C., USA.
    Poelzer, Gregory A
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Shaiman, Melissa
    George Washington University, Washington, D.C., USA.
    Tafrate, Jacob
    George Washington University, Washington, D.C., USA.
    Governing the green economy in the Arctic2023In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 176, no 4, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden’s Norrbotten County, a “green transition” driven by market demand and new normative structures is underway, creating a regional mega-project designed to put Sweden at the forefront of emerging green industries. These industries, such as carbon-neutral steel fabrication, battery production, and data center hosting, all require large amounts of energy, land, and minerals. This paper applies the regional environmental governance framework to Arctic data to examine which stakeholders have the capacity to impose their agenda on the Arctic environment and the points of conflict and collaboration during this period of accelerated growth. The paper tests the assumption that regional governance accommodates a plurality of interests. A case study examining Norrbotten County’s industrial mega-project centered around Luleå, Sweden, identifies a dominant coalition uniting government and industry that supports norms seeking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in this region. However, the existing regional governance model does a poor job of integrating the local Indigenous Sámi preferences for land use. At the core of the difference between actors advancing the green economy and the local Sámi reindeer herders are divergent conceptions of nature and sustainability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Gardelli, Caroline
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Pettersson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Nya regler om invasiva främmande arter: Hur försiktigt blev det?2023In: Europarättslig tidskrift, ISSN 1403-8722, E-ISSN 2002-3561, no 4, p. 701-718Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Gasperi, Johnny
    et al.
    GERS-LEE, UniversitéGustave Eiffel, IFSTTAR, F-44344 Bouguenais, France; Leesu, UniversitéParis Est Creteil, Ecole des Ponts, F-94010 Creteil, France.
    Le Roux, Julien
    Leesu, UniversitéParis Est Creteil, Ecole des Ponts, F-94010 Creteil, France.
    Deshayes, Steven
    Leesu, Ecole des Ponts, Université Paris Est Creteil, F-77455 Marne-la-Vallee, France.
    Ayrault, Sophie
    LSCE-IPSL, UMR 8212 (CEA/CNRS/UVSQ), Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
    Bordier, Louise
    LSCE-IPSL, UMR 8212 (CEA/CNRS/UVSQ), Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
    Boudahmane, Lila
    Leesu, UniversitéParis Est Creteil, Ecole des Ponts, F-94010 Creteil, France.
    Budzinski, Hélène
    UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, F-33400 Talence, France.
    Caupos, Emilie
    Leesu, Université Paris Est Creteil, Ecole des Ponts, F-94010 Creteil, France.
    Caubrière, Nadège
    GERS-LEE, Université Gustave Eiffel, IFSTTAR, F-44344 Bouguenais, France.
    Flanagan, Kelsey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water. Leesu, Ecole des Ponts, Université Paris Est Creteil, F-77455 Marne-la-Vallee, France.
    Guillon, Martin
    GERS-LEE, Université Gustave Eiffel, IFSTTAR, F-44344 Bouguenais, France.
    Huynh, Nina
    Leesu, Université Paris Est Creteil, Ecole des Ponts, F-94010 Creteil, France.
    Labadie, Pierre
    UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, F-33400 Talence, France.
    Meffray, Laurent
    CEREMA, Equipe de Recherche Team, 12 rue Teisserenc de Bort, F-78190 Trappes, France; Aquatycia 7/9ter rue Parmentier, F-94140 Alfortville, France.
    Neveu, Pascale
    STEA, Ville de Paris, F-75000 Paris, France.
    Partibane, Chandirane
    Leesu, Ecole des Ponts, Université Paris Est Creteil, F-77455 Marne-la-Vallee, France.
    Paupardin, Julien
    DEA, Conseil Départemental de la Seine St Denis, F-93110 Rosny-sous-Bois, France.
    Saad, Mohamed
    Leesu, Ecole des Ponts, Université Paris Est Creteil, F-77455 Marne-la-Vallee, France.
    Varnede, Lucie
    CEREMA, Equipe de Recherche Team, 12 rue Teisserenc de Bort, F-78190 Trappes, France; Ecovegetal, Les Grandes Pieces, F-28410 Broue, France.
    Gromaire, Marie-Christine
    Leesu, Ecole des Ponts, Université Paris Est Creteil, F-77455 Marne-la-Vallee, France.
    Micropollutants in Urban Runoff from Traffic Areas: Target and Non-Target Screening on Four Contrasted Sites2022In: Water, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 14, no 3, article id 394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Projected changes in temperature and precipitation in mid-latitude wet regions are expected to significantly affect forest ecosystems. We studied the physiological and shoot growth responses of Abies holophylla and Abies koreana seedlings to warming (3◦C above ambient temperature) and increased precipitation (irrigation with 40% of rainfall) treatments under open-field conditions. The physiological parameters, quantified by the net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, and total chlorophyll content, were monitored from July to October 2018. Shoot growth (i.e., root collar diameter and height) was assessed in August and December 2018. Irrespective of the treatments, the physiological parameters of both species decreased from July to August under warming treatment due to heat stress before recovering in September and October. Warming alone (W) and warming along with increased precipitation (W*P) decreased the physiological activities of both species in July, August, and September, with more pronounced effects on A. koreana compared with A. holophylla. Increased precipitation resulted in the increased chlorophyll content of both species in October. Shoot growth was not generally affected by the treatments, except for a subtle reduction in height under W*P for A. koreana. A. holophylla had consistently higher values for the physiological parameters and shoot growth than A. koreana. Our results indicate that the physiological activities of the Abies species could be seriously reduced under climate change, with a more severe impact on A. koreana. Among the two species, A. holophylla appears to be a more robust candidate for future forest planting.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Gavric, Snezana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Flanagan, Kelsey
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Österlund, Helene
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Facilitating maintenance of stormwater ponds: comparison of analytical methods for determination of metal pollution2022In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 29, no 49, p. 74877-74893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stormwater ponds are widely used for controlling runoff quality through the sedimentation of particles and associated pollutants. Their maintenance requires regular removal and disposal of accumulated material. This necessitates an assessment of material hazardousness, including potential hazard due to its contamination by metals. Here we analyze 32 stormwater pond sediment samples from 17 facilities using several chemical analysis methods (total extraction, sequential extraction, diffusive gradients in thin-films DGT, and pore water extraction) in order to consider the complementarity and comparability of the different approaches. No clear relationship was found between analyses that have the potential to measure similar metal fractions (DGT and either fraction 1 of the sequential extraction (adsorbed and exchangeable metals and carbonates) or pore water concentrations). Loss on ignition (LOI) had a significant positive correlation with an indicator of the environmental risk developed in this paper (∑ranks) that incorporates different metals, speciations, and environmental endpoints. Large variations in metal levels were observed between ponds. As clustering was limited between the different analyses, a comprehensive analysis of different parameters is still needed to fully understand metal speciation and bioavailability.

  • 41.
    Grafström, Jonas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Technological Change in Service of the Environment2018Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Jonas Grafstrom provides an outline of how technological change in the renewable energy field can contribute to mitigate climate issues. Such knowledge enables policy makers (e.g., at the EU level) to make better and more informed decisions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Grundström Mörtzell, Beatrice
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Riskbedömning av petroleumkolväten i mark och grundvatten vid Uddebo Oljehamn.2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Uddebo Oljehamn är en av sex hamndelar inom Luleå Hamns område och har sedan 1940-talet bedrivit miljöfarlig verksamhet. Idag har Uddebo Oljehamn två kajer där det årligen lastas och lossas cirka 360 000 ton flytande produkter av petroleum, bensen och stenkolstjära. Inom industriområdet arrenderas mark ut till olika verksamhetsutövare, dessa är för närvarande:Circle K, Flogas, Kemira, LKAB, Preem, Ragnsells, Stena samt ST1. Under åren har ett flertal marktekniska undersökningar genomförts i uppdrag av enskilda verksamhetsutövare, dock har en sammanställd bild av föroreningssituationen över hela industriområdet saknats.

    Huvudsyftet med denna studie var att, för Uddebo Oljehamn, utföra en förenklad riskklassning inom Naturvårdsverkets ramar, av jord och grundvatten. Metoden bestod främst av en litteraturstudie samt statistiska beräkningar av representativ halt. Materialet till litteraturstudien tillhandahölls från Luleå Hamn och aktiva verksamhetsutövare på området. Information har även samlats från Luleå kommuns stadsarkiv och miljö- och byggförvaltningens arkiv.

    I riskbedömningen delades området in i 13 delområden och halten petroleumkolväten bedömdes för respektive område utifrån generella riktvärden från Naturvårdsverket och Svenska Petroleum Institutet. Resultatet blev att hela området bedöms tillhöra riskklass 2. På området har mark och grundvatten ställvis kraftigt förorenats till den grad som innebär stor risk för människor och miljö. Med den genomsläppliga jordarten i området finns stor risk att föroreningarna sprids från källan via grundvattnet.

    En mindre del av studien var att undersöka riskminimerande materials förmåga att separera kolföreningar genom sorption. Vid Uddebo Oljehamn finns ett reningsverk som behandlar oljeförorenat avloppsvatten genom en filteranläggning med en filterbädd av sand och antracit. I laboratorium utfördes enstegs skaktest enligt den svenska standarden SS-EN 12457-2 med L/S kvot 10. Inkommande vatten till filteranläggningen skaktestades med materialen: antracit, sand, FloatAbsorb och järnbelagt torvpulver. Resultatet visade att halten kolföreningar i blankprovet var lågt. Blandningen av sand och antracit hade mest framgång i att reducera halten organiskt kol i vattnet. Torvmaterialen adderade halten organiskt kol och lämpade sig inte till denna typ av rening.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Gunnvard, Per
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Garcia, Nelson
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Mattsson, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Laue, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Jia, Qi
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Monitoring of a timber pile-supported road embankment2022In: Proceedings Eleventh International Conference on the Bearing Capacity of Roads, Railways and Airfields / [ed] Inge Hoff, Helge Mork, Rabbira Garba Saba, London: CRC Press, 2022, Vol. 2, p. 337-347Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Timber piling allows for a solution with lower carbon footprint than concrete or steel piling, yet there exist few well-documented cases of modern timber piled embankments. In this paper, field measurements on a geosynthetic-reinforced timber pile-supported road embankment are reported and evaluated. The monitored road embankment is a section of a newly reconstructed semi-motorway in northern Sweden. The embankment was constructed on 8 m long untreated timber piles with 1.1 m spacing in a triangular pattern, without pile caps. On top of that, a 1.7 m high embankment was constructed, reinforced by two layers of biaxial geogrids. A long-term monitoring program is being carried out from when the semi-motorway was reconstructed. This study presents results from the first year of monitoring. The measurements include the load on the pile heads and subsoil, geogrid strain, pore water pressures, and settlements. The measurements show the development of arching over time, the interlocking of geogrid and embankment material, the subsoil consolidation, etc. The results of the monitoring are compared with results of analytical models from recommendations and codes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Gusiatin, Zygmunt Mariusz
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Faculty of Geoengineering, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, 10719 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Kaal, Joeri
    Pyrolyscience, 28015 Madrid, Spain.
    Wasilewska, Agnieszka
    Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Faculty of Geoengineering, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, 10719 Olsztyn, Poland.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    Radziemska, Maja
    Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, 02776 Warsaw, Poland.
    Short-Term Soil Flushing with Tannic Acid and Its Effect on Metal Mobilization and Selected Properties of Calcareous Soil2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 11, article id 5698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cadmium, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn removal via soil flushing with tannic acid (TA) as a plant biosurfactant was studied. The soil was treated for 30 h in a column reactor at a constant TA concentration and pH (3%, pH 4) and at variable TA flow rates (0.5 mL/min or 1 mL/min). In the soil leachates, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved organic carbon, and metal concentrations were monitored. Before and after flushing, soil pH, EC, organic matter content, and cation exchange capacity (CEC) were determined. To analyze the organic matter composition, pyrolysis as well as thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used. Metal fractionation in unflushed and flushed soil was analyzed using a modified sequential extraction method. The data on cumulative metal removal were analyzed using OriginPro 8.0 software (OriginLab Corporation, Northampton, MA, USA) and were fitted to 4-parameter logistic sigmoidal model. It was found that flushing time had a stronger influence on metal removal than flow rate. The overall efficiency of metal removal (expressed as the ratio between flushed metal concentration and total metal concentration in soil) at the higher flow rate decreased in this order: Cd (86%) > Ni (44%) > Cu (29%) ≈ Zn (26%) > Pb (15%). Metals were removed from the exchangeable fraction and redistributed into the reducible fraction. After flushing, the soil had a lower pH, EC, and CEC; a higher organic matter content; the composition of the organic matter had changed (incorporation of TA structures). Our results prove that soil flushing with TA is a promising approach to decrease metal concentration in soil and to facilitate carbon sequestration in soil.

  • 45.
    Haddaway, Neal R.
    et al.
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Linnégatan 87D, Stockholm, Sweden; Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Müncheberg, Germany; Africa Centre for Evidence, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Smith, Adrienne
    Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel by Drive, Ottawa, ON, K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Taylor, Jessica J.
    Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel by Drive, Ottawa, ON, K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Andrews, Christopher
    Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel by Drive, Ottawa, ON, K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Cooke, Steven J.
    Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel by Drive, Ottawa, ON, K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Nilsson, Annika E.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Lesser, Pamela
    Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, 96101, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Evidence of the impacts of metal mining and the effectiveness of mining mitigation measures on social-ecological systems in Arctic and boreal regions: a systematic map2022In: Environmental Evidence, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mining can directly and indirectly affect social and environmental systems in a range of positive and negative ways, and may result in societal benefits, but may also cause conflicts, not least in relation to land use. Mining always affects the environment, whilst remediation and mitigation efforts may effectively ameliorate some negative environmental impacts. Social and environmental systems in Arctic and boreal regions are particularly sensitive to impacts from development for numerous reasons, not least of which are the reliance of Indigenous peoples on subsistence livelihoods and long recovery times of fragile ecosystems. With growing metal demand, mining in the Arctic is expected to increase, demanding a better understand its social and environmental impacts. We report here the results of a systematic mapping of research evidence of the impacts of metal mining in Arctic and boreal regions.

    Methods: We searched multiple bibliographic databases and organisational websites for relevant research using tested search strategies. We also collected evidence from stakeholders and rightsholders identified in the wider 3MK project (Mapping the impacts of Mining using Multiple Knowledges, https://osf.io/cvh3u). We screened articles at three stages (title, abstract, and full text) according to a predetermined set of inclusion criteria, with consistency checks between reviewers at each level. We extracted data relating to causal linkages between actions or impacts and measured outcomes, along with descriptive information about the articles and studies. We have produced an interactive database along with interactive visualisations, and identify knowledge gaps and clusters using heat maps.

    Review findings: Searches identified over 32,000 potentially relevant records, which resulted in a total of 585 articles being retained in the systematic map. This corresponded to 902 lines of data on impact or mitigation pathways. The evidence was relatively evenly spread across topics, but there was a bias towards research in Canada (35% of the evidence base). Research was focused on copper (23%), gold (18%), and zinc (16%) extraction as the top three minerals, and open pit mines were most commonly studied (33%). Research most commonly focused on operation stages, followed by abandonment and post-closure, with little evidence on early stages (prospecting, exploration, construction; 2%), expansion (0.2%), or decommissioning/closure (0.3%). Mitigation measures were not frequently studied (18% articles), with groundwater mitigation most frequently investigated (54% of mitigations), followed by soil quality (12%) and flora species groups (10%). Control-impact study designs were most common (68%) with reference sites as the most frequently used comparator (43%). Only 7 articles investigated social and environmental outcomes together. the most commonly reported system was biodiversity (39%), followed by water (34%), societies (20%), and soil/geology (6%), with air the least common (1%).

    Conclusions: The evidence found highlights a suite of potential knowledge gaps, namely: on early stages prior to operation; effectiveness of mitigation measures; stronger causal inference study designs; migration and demography; cumulative impacts; and impacts on local and Indigenous communities. We also tentatively suggest subtopics where the number of studies could allow systematic reviews: operation, post-closure, and abandonment stages; individual faunal species, surface water quality, water sediment quality; and, groundwater mitigation measure effectiveness.

  • 46.
    Halder, Bijay
    et al.
    Department of Remote Sensing and GIS, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore, 721102, India; New Era and Development in Civil Engineering Research Group, Scientific Research Center, Al-Ayen University, Nasiriyah, Thi-Qar, 64001, Iraq.
    Ahmadianfar, Iman
    Department of Civil Engineering, Behbahan Khatam Alanbia University of Technology, Behbahan, Iran.
    Heddam, Salim
    Agronomy Department, Faculty of Science, University, 20 Août 1955 Skikda, Route El Hadaik, BP 26, Skikda, Algeria.
    Mussa, Zainab Haider
    College of Pharmacy, University of Al-Ameed, Karbala, Iraq.
    Goliatt, Leonardo
    Computational Modeling Program, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil.
    Tan, Mou Leong
    GeoInformatic Unit, Geography Section, School of Humanities, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Penang, Malaysia; School of Geographical Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, 210023, China.
    Sa’adi, Zulfaqar
    Centre for Environmental Sustainability and Water Security, Research Institute for Sustainable Environment, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), 81310, Sekudai, Johor, Malaysia.
    Al-Khafaji, Zainab
    Department of Building and Construction Technologies Engineering, AL-Mustaqbal University College, Hillah, 51001, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Jawad, Ali H.
    Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia.
    Yaseen, Zaher Mundher
    Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, 31261, Saudi Arabia; Interdisciplinary Research Center for Membranes and Water Security, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.
    Machine learning-based country-level annual air pollutants exploration using Sentinel-5P and Google Earth Engine2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, article id 7968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climatic condition is triggering human health emergencies and earth’s surface changes. Anthropogenic activities, such as built-up expansion, transportation development, industrial works, and some extreme phases, are the main reason for climate change and global warming. Air pollutants are increased gradually due to anthropogenic activities and triggering the earth’s health. Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2), Carbon Monoxide (CO), and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) are truthfully important for air quality measurement because those air pollutants are more harmful to the environment and human’s health. Earth observational Sentinel-5P is applied for monitoring the air pollutant and chemical conditions in the atmosphere from 2018 to 2021. The cloud computing-based Google Earth Engine (GEE) platform is applied for monitoring those air pollutants and chemical components in the atmosphere. The NO2 variation indicates high during the time because of the anthropogenic activities. Carbon Monoxide (CO) is also located high between two 1-month different maps. The 2020 and 2021 results indicate AQI change is high where 2018 and 2019 indicates low AQI throughout the year. The Kolkata have seven AQI monitoring station where high nitrogen dioxide recorded 102 (2018), 48 (2019), 26 (2020) and 98 (2021), where Delhi AQI stations recorded 99 (2018), 49 (2019), 37 (2020), and 107 (2021). Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Pune, and Chennai recorded huge fluctuations of air pollutants during the study periods, where ~ 50–60% NO2 was recorded as high in the recent time. The AOD was noticed high in Uttar Pradesh in 2020. These results indicate that air pollutant investigation is much necessary for future planning and management otherwise; our planet earth is mostly affected by the anthropogenic and climatic conditions where maybe life does not exist.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 47.
    Han, Zhenyao
    et al.
    School of Resources, Environment and Materials, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanning 530004, China.
    Nhung, Nguyen Thi Hong
    School of Resources, Environment and Materials, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China.
    Wu, Yongxiang
    School of Resources, Environment and Materials, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China.
    Huang, Minyi
    School of Resources, Environment and Materials, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China.
    He, Chunlin
    School of Resources, Environment and Materials, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China.
    Lu, Siminig
    Pharmaceutical College, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning 530021, China.
    Dodbiba, Gjergj
    Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan.
    Wei, Yuezou
    School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan 421001, China.
    Otsuki, Akira
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Géologie, Geo Ressources UMR 7359 CNRS, University of Lorraine, 2 Rue du Doyen Marcel Roubault, BP 10162, 54505 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France.
    Fujita, Toyohisa
    School of Resources, Environment and Materials, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanning 530004, China.
    Arsenic (III) oxidation and removal from artificial mine wastewater by blowing O2 nanobubbles2022In: Journal of Water Process Engineering, E-ISSN 2214-7144, Vol. 47, article id 102780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study found that with the help of O2 nanobubble pre-oxidation treatment effective arsenic removal was successfully achieved and is expected to be applicable on an industrial scale. The main research findings to remove arsenic are as follows. The oxidation of As(III) by blowing out O2 nanobubbles, O2 millimeter-sized bubbles, and air nanobubbles was studied under the condition of As(V) equilibrium at pH 1of the Pourbaix diagram. At pH 1, only O2 nanobubbles were able to oxidize As(III) to As(V). At the same time, the oxidation rate of As(III) was about 20% in the presence of air nanobubbles and 0% in the presence of O2 millimeter-sized bubbles. According to the extended DLVO theory, O2 nanobubbles are unstable at acidic pH. Nanobubbles grow and break, and then OH is produced. Below pH 3, H3AsO3 reacts with OH and converts to H3AsO4 while As(III) is oxidized to As(V). Ferric hydroxide co-precipitation with arsenic was effective to remove arsenic ions at more than 20Fe/As mass ratio and pH higher than 4. The As(V) removal rate was higher than As(III) at acidic pH because anionic HAsO42− ion could be adsorbed onto positively charged ferric hydroxide. In the artificial mine wastewater treatment, the sedimentation height of coprecipitated sludge was reduced by O2 nanobubble utilization due to O2 and Fe(OH)3 hetero-coagulation.

  • 48.
    Helmersson, Katarina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Effects of Microplastic Leachates on Phytoplankton: A Laboratory Study on Nodularia spumigena and Phaeodactylum tricornutum2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 300 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Herrmann, Inga
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Okwori, Emmanuel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Spillvattenflöden från hushåll med enskilt avlopp och kompakt reningsteknik2021Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Ho, Hung Chak
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesiology, School of Clinical Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong; Department of Urban Planning and Design, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Ren, Chao
    Division of Landscape Architecture, Faculty of Architecture, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Wang, Dan
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Ontario Tech University, Oshawa, Canada; Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Oshawa, Canada.
    Systematic identification of heat events associated with emergency admissions to enhance the heat-health action plan in a subtropical city: a data-driven approach2022In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 29, no 59, p. 89273-89282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR), a heat-health action plan should address various impacts of hazards at different levels, including an early warning system to monitor risks and behaviour enhancement to increase disaster preparedness. It is necessary to comply with guidelines regarding heat duration/intensity. In this study, we developed a data-driven approach to rapidly and systematically estimate the impacts of various heat events on emergency admissions among the adult population (n = 7,086,966) in Hong Kong in order to enhance the heat-health action plan. Immediate, short-term, and long-term impacts determined by 1-day, 4-day, and 8-day windows were estimated to identify specific heat events suitable for early warnings. In addition, underestimated risk, determined by a continuous increase in heat risk after days without significant emergency admissions, was estimated to evaluate potential maladaptive behaviours among a specific subpopulation. Based on age- and gender-specific analyses, 1D, 1D1N, and 2D2N were observed to have a stronger immediate impact on emergency admissions. 1D1N and 2D2N also showed notable short-term and long-term impacts. Based on heat vulnerability factors (age and gender), 2D2N was a higher-priority extreme heat event for early warning measures than 1D1N. Furthermore, men aged 19 to 64 had the highest underestimated risk. Specifically, they had IRR values of 1.113 [1.087, 1.140], 1.061 [1.035, 1.087], and 1.069 [1.043, 1.095] during lag days 3-5 of 3D2N, respectively, possibly due to a lack of adaptive behaviour. By adopting our approach, the duration of heat events with significant health impacts can be identified in order to further enhance relevant heat stress information. This framework can be applied to other cities with a similar background for rapid assessment.

123 1 - 50 of 139
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf