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  • 1.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Moreno, Sergio
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vacuum infusion of cellulose nanofibre network composites: Influence of porosity on permeability and impregnation2016In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 95, 204-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing issues around the processing of cellulose nanofibres (CNF) composites is important in establishing their use as sustainable, renewable polymer reinforcements. Here, CNF networks of different porosity were made with the aim of increasing their permeability and suitability for processing by vacuum infusion (VI). The CNF networks were infused with epoxy using two different strategies. The permeability, morphology and mechanical properties of the dry networks and the resulting nanocomposites were investigated. Calculated fill-times for CNF networks with 50% porosity were the shortest, but are only less than the gel-time of the epoxy if capillary effects are included. In experiments the CNF networks were clearly wetted. However low transparency indicated that impregnation was incomplete. The modulus and strength of the dry CNF networks increased rapidly with decreasing porosity, but their nanocomposites did not follow this trend, showing instead similar mechanical properties to each other. The results demonstrated that increasing the porosity of the CNF networks to ≈ 50% gives better impregnation resulting in a lower ultimate strength, a higher yield strength and no loss in modulus. Better use of the flow channels in the inherently layered CNF networks could potentially reduce void content in these nanocomposites and thus increase their mechanical properties.

  • 2.
    Aitomäki, Yvonne
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Moreno, Sergio
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Vacuum Infusion of Nanocellulose Networks of Different Porosity2015In: 20th International Conference on Composite Materials: Copenhagen, 19-24th July 2015, ICCM , 2015, 4109-1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibres (CNF) have shown good potential as sustainable, biobased reinforcing materials in polymer composites. Addressing issues around the processing of these composites is an important part of establishing their use in different applications. Here, CNF networks of different porosity are made from nanofibrillated hardwood kraft pulp with the aim of increasing the impregnation of the CNF networks and to allow vacuum infusion to be used. Two different vacuum infusion strategies: in-plane and out of plane were used to infuse the CNF networks with a low viscosity epoxy. The permeability, morphology and mechanical properties of the dry networks and the resulting nanocomposites were investigated and compared to a micro-fibre based network. Using the out-of-plane permeability measurements and Darcy’s law, the fill-time was calculated and showed that the CNF network with 40% porosity had the lowest fill-time when an out-of-plane impregnation strategy is used. However this exceeded the gel-time of the epoxy system. In experiments, the resin reached the other side of the network but low transparency indicated that wetting was poor. The dry CNF preforms showed a very strong dependence on the porosity with both modulus and strength increasing rapidly at low porosity. Interestingly, the composite based on the 60% porosity network showed good wetting particularly with the in-plane infusion strategy, exhibiting a much more brittle fracture and a high yield strength. This shows that in CNF composites produced by VI, lowering the fibre volume content of the CNF composites gives better impregnation resulting in a lower ultimate strength but higher yield strength and no loss in modulus.

  • 3.
    Almqvist, Andreas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Fabricius, John
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Wall, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mathematical Science.
    Flow in thin domains with a microstructure: Lubrication and thin porous media2017In: AIP Conference Proceedings, ISSN 0094-243X, E-ISSN 1551-7616, Vol. 1798, 020172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is devoted to homogenization of different models of flow in thin domains with a microstructure. The focus is on applications connected to the effect of surface roughness in full film lubrication, but a parallel to flow in thin porous media is also discussed. Mathematical models of such flows naturally include two small parameters. One is connected to the fluid film thickness and the other to the microstructure. The corresponding asymptotic analysis is a delicate problem, since the result depends on how fast the two small parameters tend to zero relative to each other. We give a review of the current status in this area and point out some future challenges.

  • 4.
    Altorkmany, Lobna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Kharseh, Mohamad
    Civil Environmental Engineering Department, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Ljung, Anna-Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Experimental and Simulation Validation of ABHE for Disinfection of Legionella in Hot Water Systems2017In: Applied Thermal Engineering, ISSN 1359-4311, E-ISSN 1873-5606, Vol. 116, 253-265 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work refers to an innovative system inspired by nature that mimics the thermoregulation system that exists in animals. This method, which is called Anti Bacteria Heat Exchanger (ABHE), is proposed to achieve continuous thermal disinfection of bacteria in hot water systems with high energy efficiency. In particular, this study aims to demonstrate the opportunity to gain energy by means of recovering heat over a plate heat exchanger. Firstly, the thermodynamics of the ABHE is clarified to define the ABHE specification. Secondly, a first prototype of an ABHE is built with a specific configuration based on simplicity regarding design and construction. Thirdly, an experimental test is carried out. Finally, a computer model is built to simulate the ABHE system and the experimental data is used to validate the model. The experimental results indicate that the performance of the ABHE system is strongly dependent on the flow rate, while the supplied temperature has less effect. Experimental and simulation data show a large potential for saving energy of this thermal disinfection method by recovering heat. To exemplify, when supplying water at a flow rate of 5 kg/min and at a temperature of 50 °C, the heat recovery is about 1.5 kW while the required pumping power is 1 W. This means that the pressure drop is very small compared to the energy recovered and consequently high saving in total cost is promising.

  • 5.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    An experimental investigation of flow in a Kaplan runner: steady-state and transient2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Water turbines are since some years widely used for grid stabilization purposes according to their exceptional load variation capability which gives them the ability to compensate grid fluctuations initiated by the customer’s consumption or intermittent electricity production systems such as wind and solar power. Different renewable power generation technologies can be combined in mini-grids to electrify isolated villages and extend existing grid networks. In these occasions, small hydro units are also a good option to reduce the overall variability of supply to low levels and provide low‑cost, local electrification solutions. Hence, initially designed hydropower turbines for steady operation at on-design operating condition experience many off-design, start/stop and load variations during their life time according to the nowadays on-demand energy market and introduction of intermittent power generation systems to the electricity market.Start/stop and load variations can be harsh for the turbines due to the time dependent forces exerted on different parts of the turbines, especially rotating parts. Off-design performance of hydropower systems may also result in unfavorable and harmful periodic forces on the rotating parts. Therefore, investigations are required to study these working conditions and consider them in design of new hydropower plants and refurbished turbines. This was the motivation for the experimental investigation of a Kaplan turbine during on-design, off-design and transient operations with focus on the turbine’s rotor. The test case was a 1:3.1 scaled model of Porjus U9; a Kaplan turbine. The first paper deals with pressure measurements on the runner blades of the model under steady state operating conditions to find and quantify the sources of pressure fluctuations exerted on the runner at different operating points. The goal was to investigate the turbine’s performance at the best efficiency point with concentration on the performance of the water supply system and compare it to operations at high load and part load for a constant blades angle. The model results are compared with prototype measurements to corroborate the findings. The second paper presents the model investigations during load acceptance and load rejection. The model was investigated with pressure measurement on the stationary and rotating parts of the turbine under different load variations between part load, high load and best efficiency point. The third paper focuses on velocity measurements in the runner blade channels and at the runner outlet under on-design and off-design operating conditions. The velocity measurements are performed with a laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) system. The results of the model investigations along two propeller curves are presented to investigate the runner blade angle effects on the turbine’s performance.

  • 6.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Experimental investigation of a Kaplan runner under steady-state and transient operations2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydropower is a key part in electricity production nowadays. Hydropower electricity production rose to 3579.5 TWh in 2013, ranked as the second source of electricity production in the world after fossil fuels. It is the principle source of renewable electricity production, producing 16.2% of the electricity in 2013, accounting for 78% of the renewable electricity production in the world. Specifically in Sweden, hydropower is the main source of electricity production producing 47.5% of the required electricity. Nuclear, biomass, and wind placed in the following positions in the ranking in 2013 with 38.4%, 6.5%, and 4.3%, respectively.Besides meeting electricity demand with an environmental-friendly method, hydropower has a unique and important role which is grid regulation: balancing electricity production and consumption. Gas turbines and hydraulic turbines called “Primary reserves” are the only electricity production systems that can be used for fast regulations due to their short start-up time from 1 to 60 s. The obvious environmental problems, air pollution, and costs associated with gas turbines make hydropower a prime alternative whenever applicable. In Sweden, the share of fossil fuels in electricity production is small; 2.8% in 2012 with an average annual growth of -0.7% in the period 2002-2012. Hence, hydropower is practically the only available source used to regulate the grid fluctuations resulting from deregulated market and fast growth of intermittent power generation systems, i.e., solar and wind energy. Hydraulic turbines are subject to frequent off-design and transient operations because of their grid regulation responsibility. Such operating conditions decrease turbine’s efficiency and affect its lifetime significantly. Off-design and transient operation of hydraulic turbines may induce unpredicted pressure fluctuations on the stationary and rotating parts of the turbine. Special attention should be dedicated to the effects of such phenomena on the runner blades because of their importance on the efficiency of the turbine, and their vulnerability to the pressure fluctuations.This thesis presents an experimental investigation on the effects of off-design and transient operation of an axial hydraulic turbine on velocity fields and pressure fluctuations exerted on the runner and the draft tube of a turbine. The investigation was performed on a 1:3.1 scaled model of a Kaplan turbine known as Porjus U9. The main objective was to investigate the effect of operating point on pressure and velocity fluctuations in the runner and the draft tube. Another objective was to study the effect of transient operation on pressure fluctuations exerted on the runner and the draft tube, to investigate the formation and mitigation process of a rotating vortex rope (RVR) within the draft tube. Finally, the effect of the swirl leaving the runner and the draft tube bend on the performance of the turbine was investigated. The study involves pressure measurements on the runner blades and draft tube walls of the turbine, laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements within and after the runner, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements within the draft tube.The pressure and LDA results acquired during steady state operation of the turbine showed different sources of fluctuations on the runner at different operating points resulting in symmetric and asymmetric fluctuating forces on the runner. The pressure measurements during transient operating conditions exhibited pressure fluctuations exerted on the runner during load variations and elucidated some aspects of formation and mitigation process of RVR within the draft tube. The PIV measurements performed after the draft tube bend of the turbine focuses on the physical phenomena resulting in flow asymmetry after the draft tube bend of hydraulic turbines affecting their efficiency.

  • 7.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Mulu, Berhanu
    Vattenfall Research and Development, Älvkarleby.
    Experimental investigation of the hydraulic loads on the runner of a Kaplan turbine model and the corresponding prototype2015In: Journal of Hydraulic Research, ISSN 0022-1686, E-ISSN 1814-2079, Vol. 53, no 4, 452-465 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on unsteady pressure measurements on the runner blades of a Kaplan turbine model as well as torque and radial load bearing measurements on the corresponding prototype at several operating points to investigate the sources of periodic loads exerted on the runner when operating at the best efficiency point and off design. Pressure measurements on the model runner blades indicated that the spiral casing delivers a poorly conditioned flow to the guide vanes close to the lip-entrance junction, resulting in flow separation on the guide vanes. The asymmetric flow delivered to the runner induces large oscillations with respect to the guide vane passing frequency, runner frequency and its harmonics to the runner blades. The torque measurements on the prototype also revealed an asymmetric flow at the distributor outlet. The bearing radial load measurements performed on the prototype support the torque measurement results. The asymmetric hydraulic loads on the runner result in shaft wobbling, and the oscillatory forces exerted on the blades are transferred to the main shaft and bearings. Another source of oscillating forces exerted on the runner blades is the rotating vortex rope (RVR) formation that occurs at part-load operation of the turbine and induces pressure fluctuations at two sub-synchronous frequencies to the runner.Keywords: Bearing load; blade pressure measurement; flow-induced vibration; Kaplan turbine; prototype measurement; spiral casingperformance

  • 8.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Mulu, Berhanu
    Vattenfall Research & Development.
    Raisee, Mehrdad
    Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Tehran.
    Experimental study of fluid structure interaction in a Kaplan turbine runner blade2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Raisee, M.
    School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran.
    Effects of flow unsteadiness on the wall shear stress2012In: 26th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems: 19–23 August 2012, Beijing, China, IOP Publishing Ltd , 2012, 62033- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurements were performed on pulsating fully turbulent flows in a pipe test rig with a diameter of 100 mm. Sinusoidal oscillatory flow at different frequencies was superimposed on a mean flow of averaged Reynolds number Re=20000 based on the pipe diameter. The measurements have been performed at different forcing frequencies (0.001 < ω+ < 0.08) covering all the oscillatory regimes; quasi-steady, relaxation, quasi laminar and high frequency. The amplitude of the flow oscillation was small enough to allow a linear response in the measurements, i.e., all flow parameters showed an oscillatory behavior at the frequency of the flow. The amplitude of the oscillatory flow was about 10% of the mean velocity in all cases. The results include mean and phase averaged values of different parameters. The centerline velocity was measured by a 2D LDA system. Hot film and constant temperature anemometry system was used to determine the wall shear stress. Bulk velocity and pressure gradient along the pipe were also acquired. The results showed a good agreement with the previous analytical, experimental and numerical results available in the literature.

  • 10.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Mulu, Berhanu
    Vattenfall Research and Development, Älvkarleby.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Experimental Investigation of the Interblade Flow in a Kaplan Runner at Several Operating Points Using Laser Doppler Anemometry2016In: Journal of Fluids Engineering - Trancactions of The ASME, ISSN 0098-2202, E-ISSN 1528-901X, Vol. 138, no 2, 21106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements within the runner blade channels and at the runner outlet of a Kaplan turbine model. The model was investigated at six operating points located on two propeller curves of the turbine to study the flow condition during on-cam and off-cam operations. Main and secondary flows within and after the runner were analyzed, and the effects of the hub and tip clearances on the velocity fields within and after the runner were evaluated. Operation of the turbine at flow rates that are lower than the designed rate for the corresponding propeller curve resulted in vortex breakdown and the formation of a rotating vortex rope (RVR). The RVR formation produced an asymmetrical velocity distribution within and after the runner. The results demonstrated the occurrence of an oscillating flow with the same frequency as the vortex rope within the blade channels located upstream of the RVR. This results in an asymmetric flow through the runner and oscillating forces on the runner blades. The measured velocities indicated that the geometrical asymmetries in the runner manufacturing process resulted in various flow asymmetries at the measured sections. The asymmetries were up to 3% within the runner and 7% at the runner outlet

  • 11.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Mulu, Berhanu
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Raisee, Mehrdad
    School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Tehran.
    Effects of load variation on a Kaplan turbine runner2016In: International Journal of Fluid Machinery and Systems, ISSN 1882-9554, E-ISSN 1882-9554, Vol. 9, no 2, 182-193 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction of intermittent electricity production systems like wind and solar power to electricity market together with the deregulation of electricity markets resulted in numerous start/stops, load variations and off-design operation of water turbines. Hydraulic turbines suffer from the varying loads exerted on their stationary and rotating parts during load variations they are not designed for such operating conditions. Investigations on part load operation of single regulated turbines, i.e., Francis and propeller, proved the formation of a rotating vortex rope (RVR) in the draft tube. The RVR induces pressure pulsations in the axial and rotating direction called plunging and rotating modes, respectively. This results in oscillating forces with two different frequencies on the runner blades, bearings and other rotating parts of the turbine. This study investigates the effect of transient operations on the pressure fluctuations exerted on the runner and mechanism of the RVR formation/mitigation. Draft tube and runner blades of the Porjus U9 model, a Kaplan turbine, were equipped with pressure sensors for this purpose. The model was run in off-cam mode during different load variations. The results showed that the transients between the best efficiency point and the high load occurs in a smooth way. However, during transitions to the part load a RVR forms in the draft tube which induces high level of fluctuations with two frequencies on the runner; plunging and rotating mode. Formation of the RVR during the load rejections coincides with sudden pressure change on the runner while its mitigation occurs in a smooth way.

  • 12.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Mulu, Berhanu G.
    Vattenfall Research and Development, Älvkarleby.
    Raisee, Mehrdad
    Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Tehran.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Effects of upstream flow conditions on runner pressure fluctuations2017In: Journal of Applied Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 1735-3572, E-ISSN 1735-3645, Vol. 10, no 4, 1045-1059 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rotor-stator interaction and the corresponding pressure fluctuations represent one of the sources of pressure and load fluctuations on the rotating parts of rotating machineries. The high-Reynolds flow is subject to rotation in the comparably large vaneless space of axial turbines, causing wake interaction and wake dissipation in this region. This increases the level of flow complexity in this region. This study examined the effect of the flow condition entering the spiral casing on the flow condition within the distributor and the runner and the physical source of pressure fluctuations exerted on the runner of a Kaplan turbine model. Simulations were performed within the water supply system, including the upstream tank, penstock, and the Francis turbines, the level of entering the spiral casing; the results were compared with laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) results. The results were considered as the inlet boundary condition for simulation of the turbine model from the spiral inlet to the draft tube outlet to investigate the flow condition within the distributor and the runner. The CFD simulations showed that the water supply system induces inhomogeneity to the velocity distribution at the spiral inlet. However, the flow condition does not affect the pressure fluctuations exerted on the runner blades due to the rotor-stator interactions. Moreover, the dominant frequencies exerted on the runner blades were accurately approximated although the amplitudes of the fluctuations were underestimated.

  • 13.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Mulu, Berhanu
    Raisee, Mehrdad
    School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Tehran.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Experimental study on flow asymmetry after the draft tube bend of a Kaplan turbine2016In: Advances and Applications in Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0973-4686, Vol. 19, no 2, 441-472 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow condition in a Kaplan turbine draft tube is investigated using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry(PIV). The investigated draft tube is composed of a cone followed by an elbow and a straight diffuser. The three velocity components were measured after the elbow at two different locations across the straight diffuser to quantify the flow asymmetry as well as the secondary flows formed in this region. The velocity profiles at the draft tube inlet are measured using a 2D LDA system allowing estimation of the draft tube inlet swirl. The results are presented at three operating points of the turbine. The flow condition after the draft tube bend was shown to be highly dependent on the vortex structures within the straight draft tube; namely Dean vortices and the swirl leaving the runner. At operating points with high flow rates and low swirl, Dean vortices dominate the upstream swirl; a symmetric but inhomogeneous flow resembling flow after a pipe bend forms within the straight diffuser. At part load operating points with high swirl and low flow rate, the flow after the bend is dominated by the upstream swirl resulting in asymmetric flow after the draft tube bend. The flow asymmetry is shown to be a 2nd order function of the swirl-to-Dean ratio.

  • 14.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Mulu, Berhanu
    Vattenfall Research & Development.
    Raisee, Mehrdad
    School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Tehran.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Load variation effects on the pressure fluctuations exerted on a Kaplan turbine runner2014In: 27th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems, IAHR 2014: Montreal, Canada, 22- 26 September 2014 / [ed] A-M Giroux, IOP Publishing Ltd , 2014, 32005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction of intermittent electricity production systems like wind power and solar systems to electricity market together with the consumption-based electricity production resulted in numerous start/stops, load variations and off-design operation of water turbines. The hydropower systems suffer from the varying loads exerted on the stationary and rotating parts of the turbines during load variations which they are not designed for. On the other hand, investigations on part load operation of single regulated turbines, i.e., Francis and propeller, proved the formation of rotating vortex rope (RVR) in the draft tube. The RVR induces oscillating flow both in plunging and rotating modes which results in oscillating force with two different frequencies on the runner blades, bearings and other rotating parts of the turbine. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of transient operations on the pressure fluctuations on the runner and mechanism of the RVR formation/mitigation. Draft tube and runner blades of the Porjus U9 model, a Kaplan turbine, were equipped with pressure sensors. The model was run in off-cam mode during different load variation conditions to check the runner performance under unsteady condition. The results showed that the transients between the best efficiency point and the high load happens in a smooth way while transitions to/from the part load, where rotating vortex rope (RVR) forms in the draft tube induces high level of fluctuations with two frequencies on the runner; plunging and rotating mode of the RVR.

  • 15.
    Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Mulu, Berhanu
    Vattenfall Research and Development, Älvkarleby.
    Raisee, Mehrdad
    School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Tehran.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Unsteady pressure measurements on the runner of a Kaplan turbine during load acceptance and load rejection2016In: Journal of Hydraulic Research, ISSN 0022-1686, E-ISSN 1814-2079, Vol. 54, no 1, 56-73 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper addresses unsteady pressure measurements on the blades and stationary parts of a Kaplan turbine model (Porjus U9) during load variation. The turbine was studied in various load acceptance and load rejection scenarios in off-cam mode to investigate the effect of the transients on the turbine performance. The formation and mitigation processes for the rotating vortex ropes and their effects on the forces exerted on the runner were also investigated. The results show a smooth transition during load variations between high load and the best efficiency point, at which no rotating vortex ropes form in the draft tube. However, load variation to part load resulted in a draft tube surge and the formation of a rotating vortex rope with two fluctuating components: rotating and plunging. The rotating vortex ropes began to form at the end of the draft tube cone during the closure of the guide vanes and travelled upstream with further guide vane closure. The plunging mode induced flow oscillation throughout the entire turbine conduit, whereas the rotating mode resulted in local pressure fluctuations. The rotating vortex ropes induced wide-band pressure fluctuations on the suction side of the runner close to the hub section. The formation of the rotating vortex ropes near the runner resulted in a sudden change in the pressure exerted on the suction side of the blades, whereas the rotating vortex rope mitigation process proceeded in a smooth manner.

  • 16. Amiri, Kaveh
    et al.
    Soltani, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Aerospace, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran.
    Haghiri, Ali
    Amirkabir University of Technology.
    Steady flow quality assessment of a modified transonic wind tunnel2013In: Scientia Iranica, ISSN 1026-3098, Vol. 20, no 3, 500-507 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An existing operational trisonic wind tunnel is upgraded to improve its performance criterion in the transonic regime. In this research, the test section is modified according to the operational requirements of the various existing transonic wind tunnels. Several perforated walls are designed, manufactured, and installed on the top and bottom sides of the test section. The flow in the test section of the wind tunnel is surveyed for the empty condition prior to testing models. Once satisfactory results regarding the flow quality requirements in the test section under various conditions were achieved, a 2D model, NACA 0012, and a 3D standard model for the transonic wind tunnels, AGARD-B, are manufactured and tested under various conditions for the purpose of integral calibration and validation of the tunnel data. Surface pressure distribution as well as the force and moment data compare well with the existing data from other tunnels for similar models tested under the same conditions.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Modelling flow with free and rough surfaces in the vicinity of hydropower plants2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow with free and rough surfaces near hydropower stations is of interest for both engineering and environmental applications. Here, Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of free surface flow and flow over rough surfaces in regulated rivers were performed in applications such fish migration, spillway design and flow over rough surfaces as in hydropower tunnels or natural channels. For all the investigated applications it is typical with very large geometrical scales, high flow rates and highly turbulent flow. Modelling boundaries such as free water surfaces and rough walls presents a challenge and was given special attention as well as the treatment of turbulence. Validation of the numerical simulations was performed in all cases with methods such as acoustic measurements with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and optical measurements with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).Numerical simulations have been used to evaluate the flow downstream the Stornorrfors hydropower plant in Umeälven with regards to upstream migrating fish. Field measurements with an ADCP were performed and the measurements were used to validate the simulations. By adding a fish ladder in the simulations it was possible to investigate the attraction water created from the fishway at different positions and angles. An additional possibility to create better attraction water and improve the conditions for upstream migrating fish was simulated by guiding the spill water from the hydropower dam through a smaller passage from the old river bed.Fish population data from the same location was compared with flow fields from numerical simulations. The population data was compared with variables such as velocity, vorticity and turbulence intensity. A correlation between fish detections and turbulence intensity was shown.Simulations on the spilling from a dam were performed and compared to experimental results from a physical scale model. ADV was used to measure the velocity and validate the simulations. Two different spillway configurations were considered and simulations with both the Rigid Lid model and the Volume of Fluids method were carried out. Water levels, velocities and the shape of the water surface were compared between simulations and experiments. The simulations capture both qualitative features such as a vortex near the outlet and show good quantitative agreement with the experiments.A wall with large surface roughness was created by laser scanning a tunnel. One of the side walls was down-scaled and used to create a rough wall in a channel with rectangular cross-section for both a numerical model and an experimental model. Numerical simulations were performed and validated by PIV-measurements in the experimental model.The resolution of the geometry for the rough surface was lowered in two steps and numerical simulations were performed for flow over all three surfaces. The difference in flow fields in the bulk and near wall region was investigated as well as the difference in turbulent quantities which can provide good input for a new model for surface roughness in applications with very large surface roughness and high velocities such as flow in hydropower tunnels or natural channels and rivers.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Simulations and measurements of free surface flow in regulated rivers2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Open channel flow near hydropower stations is of interest for both engineering and environmental applications. In this research project Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of free surface flow in regulated rivers were applied with both fish migration and validation of numerical simulations in focus. In the first paper, numerical simulations has been used to evaluate the flow downstream a hydropower plant with regards to upstream migrating fish. Field measurements with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler were performed and the measurements were used to validate the simulations. In the second paper ,simulations on the spilling from a dam were performed and compared to experimental results from a physical scale model. The third paper deals with more in depth analysis of field measurements where the variations in the flow downstream a hydropower plant was examined.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Modelling and validation of flow over a wall with large surface roughness2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    CFD-modelling and validation of free surface flow during spilling of reservoir in down-scale model2013In: Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 1994-2060, E-ISSN 1997-003X, Vol. 7, no 1, 159-167 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Modellering av avbördning med fri vattenyta och validering i en skalmodell2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Effect of spatial resolution of rough surfaces on numerically computed flow fields with application to hydraulic engineering2014In: Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 1994-2060, E-ISSN 1997-003X, Vol. 8, no 3, 373-381 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In numerical simulations of flow over rough surfaces, the roughness is often not resolved but represented by a numerical model. The validity of such an assumption is investigated in this paper by Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of flow over a surface with a large roughness. The surface was created from a high-resolution laser scanning of a real rock blasted tunnel. By reducing the geometrical resolution of the roughness in two steps, the importance of an appropriate surface description could be examined. The flow fields obtained were compared to a set-up with a geometrical flat surface where the roughness was represented by a modified form of the Launder and Spalding wall-function. The flow field over the surface with the lowest resolution was substantially different from those of the two finer resolutions and rather close to the results from the set-up with the wall-function. The results also yield that the finer the resolution is the more vorticity is formed close to the rough surface and more turbulence is generated.

  • 23. Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Lindberg, Dan-Erik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Lindmark, Elianne
    Leonardsson, Kjell
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    A numerical study of the location and function of the entrance of a fishway in a regulated river2010In: 8th International Symposium on ECOHYDRAULICS: Bridging between Ecology and Hydraulics and Leading the Society's New Need - Living with Nature, 2010, 277-284 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation driven design with Computational Fluid Dynamics has been used to evaluate the flow downstream a hydropower plant with regards to upstream migrating fish. Field measurements with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler were performed and the measurements were used to validate the simulations. The measurements indicate a more unstable flow than the simulations and the tailrace jet from the turbines is stronger in the simulations. The simulations are however considered to capture the important features of the flow in a way that makes them viable for attraction water simulations. A fishway entrance was included in the simulations and the subsequent attraction water was evaluated for two positions and two angles of the entrance at different turbine discharges. Results show that both positions are viable and that a position where the flow from the fishway does not have to compete with the flow from the power plant will generate superior attraction water. Simulations were also performed further downstream where the flow from the turbines meets the old river bed which is the current fish passage for upstream migrating fish. A modification of the old river bed was made in the model as one scenario to generate better attraction water. This considerably increases the attraction water although it cannot compete with the flow from the tailrace tunnel.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lindberg, Dan-Erik
    SLU.
    Lindmark, Elianne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics.
    Leonardsson, Kjell
    SLU.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    SLU.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    A study of the location of the entrance of a fishway in a regulated river with CFD and ADCP2012In: Modelling and Simulation in Engineering, ISSN 1687-5591, E-ISSN 1687-5605, Vol. 2012, 327929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation-driven design with computational fluid dynamics has been used to evaluate the flow downstream of a hydropower plant with regards to upstream migrating fish. Field measurements with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler were performed, and the measurements were used to validate the simulations. The measurements indicate a more unstable flow than the simulations, and the tailrace jet from the turbines is stronger in the simulations. A fishway entrance was included in the simulations, and the subsequent attraction water was evaluated for two positions and two angles of the entrance at different turbine discharges. Results show that both positions are viable and that a position where the flow from the fishway does not have to compete with the flow from the power plant will generate superior attraction water. Simulations were also performed for further downstream where the flow from the turbines meets the old river bed which is the current fish passage for upstream migrating fish. A modification of the old river bed was made in the model as one scenario to generate better attraction water. This considerably increases the attraction water although it cannot compete with the flow from the tailrace tunnel.

  • 25. Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Lindmark, Elianne
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    CFD-modell av turbinutloppet i Stornorrfors2009In: Svenska mekanikdagarna: Södertälje 2009, Stockholm: Svenska nationalkommittén för mekanik , 2009, 106- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, Kristoffer
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Lundström, Staffan
    Simulation of free surface flow in a spillway with the rigid lid and volume of fluid methods and validation in a scale model2010In: Proceedings, Fifth European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics / [ed] Jose C. F. Pereira; Adelia Sequeira; Jose M. C. Pereira, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulations on the spilling from a dam were performed and compared to experimental results from a physical scale model. Both mechanical and acoustic methods to measure the velocity were used. The model has three gates leading into the spillway that can be maneuvered separately. At first two of the gates were closed and the inlet flow was high enough to get a fully wetted outlet at the third gate. This case was simulated with a rigid lid approximation since the water surface was considered to be plane. The water surface level was taken from the scale model. In the second case, all three gates were open resulting in a free water surface through all the gates to the spillway. This case was simulated with the Volume of Fluids method were both water and air phase were considered. Water levels, velocities and the shape of the water surface were compared between simulations and experiments. The simulations capture both qualitative features such as a vortex near the outlet and show good quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  • 27. Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Papathanasiou, T.D.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Flow through a two-scale porosity material2009In: Research Letters in Materials Science, ISSN 1687-6822, E-ISSN 1687-6830, 701512Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow through a two-scale porous medium is here investigated by a unique comparison between simulations performed with computational fluid dynamics and the boundary element method with microparticle image velocimetry in model geometries.

  • 28. Andersson, Anders G.
    et al.
    Westerberg, Lars-Göran
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Papathanasiou, Thanasis
    Lundström, Staffan
    Fluid flow through porous media with dual scale porosity2008In: Proceedings of the 19th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena (ISTP-19): Reykjavik, Iceland, August 17-21, 2008 / [ed] Sigurdur Brynjolfsson; Olafur Petur Palsson; Jong H. Kim, University of Iceland, Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow in two scale porous media takes place in applications such as advanced composites manufacturing. Knowledge of this flow is of general importance and is crucial for filtration mechanisms when functional filler-particles are added to the liquid resin impregnating the fibrous preform. Means to model and experimentally visualise this flow is here investigated. In particular simulations performed with computational fluid dynamics and the boundary element method are compared to micro particle image velocimetry in a model geometry.

  • 29.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Leonardsson, Kjell
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Lindberg, Dan-Erik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, Gunnar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies.
    Describing fish passage in a river confluence with telemetry and CFD2016In: / [ed] Webb, JA, Costelloe, JF, CasasMulet, R, Lyon, JP, Stewardson, MJ, Melbourne: University of Melbourne , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The confluence between hydropower tailrace and the old river bed in Stornorrfors in the river Umeälven in the northern part of Sweden has shown to be the largest obstacle for upstream migrating salmon and sea trout during the migrating season. Fish are attracted to the high flow rate from the tailrace and will not migrate upstream in the old river bed being the passage to the fishway leading past the hydropower dam. By triangulating the movements of radio tagged fish using eight antennas in the confluence, it is here possible to describe the individual fish tracks left by radio tagged fish during the migrating season. These tracks are then compared with three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the confluence. By simulating the most common combinations of turbine flow and spill flow in the old river bed it is then possible to find correlations between individual fish movements and flow parameters such as velocity, turbulence intensity or vorticity for different flow combinations. It was previously assumed that fish had trouble locating the old river bed, the results of the triangulation however shows that most fish finds the old river bed within a few days but does not chose to migrate until several days (or weeks) later. The main issue to be solved is therefore not how to attract the fish to the old river bed but rather how to create favorable conditions in the old river bed so that migrating fish are more inclined to take that path upstream.

  • 30.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    Electric Propulsion Systems Department, Volvo Car Group, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lennström, David
    oise, Vibrations, and Harshness Department, Volvo Car Group, SE-405 31 Gothenburg.
    Nykänen, Arne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Influence of Inverter Modulation Strategy on Electric Drive Efficiency and Perceived Sound Quality2016In: IEEE Transactions on Transportation Electrification, ISSN 2332-7782, Vol. 2, no 1, 24-35 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an evaluation of differentmodulation techniques and different levels of switching frequencyrandomization for a rear axle electrical drive unit used in auto-motive applications. Inverter and machine losses, and perceivedsound quality of high-frequency acoustic noise are investigated byfinite element calculations, experimental testing, and subjectivenoise assessment. Additionally, stator current harmonics, airgapflux density harmonics, and force density harmonics are comparedfor space vector modulation (SVM) and discontinuous pulsewidthmodulation through finite element modeling. The main conclusionis that, primarily in the field weakening region, significant energysavings can be achieved (up to 17% decrease in total inverter losseswith a switching frequency of 10 kHz). This is obtained withoutdeterioration of perceived sound quality by the use of discontinu-ous pulsewidth modulation with switching frequency randomiza-tion. Furthermore, randomization of the switching frequency doesnot improve the perceived sound quality of the acoustic noise whenusing SVM. However, for discontinuous pulsewidth modulation,improvements in perceived sound quality when randomizing theswitching frequency are observed, primarily below base speed.

  • 31.
    Andersson, H.M.
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Gebart, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Synnergren, Per
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Application of digital speckle photography to measure thickness variations in the vacuum infusion process2003In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 24, no 3, 448-455 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new method to measure the movement of the flexible bag used in vacuum infusion is presented. The method is based on an in-house developed stereoscopic digital speckle photography system (DSP). The advantage with this optical method, which is based on cross-correlation, is that the deflection of a large area can be continuously measured with a great accuracy (down to 10 μm. The method is at this stage most suited for research but can in the long run also be adopted in production control and optimization. By use of the method it was confirmed that a ditch is formed at the resin flow front and that there can be a considerable and seemingly perpetual compaction after complete filling. The existence of the ditch demonstrates that the stiffness of the reinforcement can be considerably reduced when it is wetted. Hence, the maximum fiber volume fraction can be larger than predicted from dry measurements of preform elasticity. It is likely that the overall thickness reduction after complete filling emanates from lubrication of the fibers combined with an outflow of the resin. Besides, the cross-linking starts and the polymer shrinks. Hence, the alteration in height will continue until complete cross-linking is reached.

  • 32. Andersson, Magnus
    Vacuum infusion of polymer composites2001Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The current trend towards an increased use of vacuum infusion for manufacturing of high performance fibre reinforced polymer composites has stressed the necessity of an advanced modelling of the process. Until recent years development in this area has mainly been based on trial and error and the behaviour of the method is therefore not fully understood. The basic principle of the vacuum infusion process is that a stack of dry fabrics is placed between a stiff mould half and a flexible and airtight bag. The bag is sealed to the mould expect at certain positions being open for resin supplies and outlets. Liquid resin then penetrates the stack by a reduction of the pressure at one or several positions in the formed cavity. After complete filling the pressure in the cavity is evened out by retaining the vacuum level at the outlets throughout curing of the resin. The overall goal of this research is to develop tools that ensure optimum and secure processing in practical work with vacuum infusion. The means to achieve this goal has so far been industry scale experiments, simple analysis and numerical simulations. The experimental part comprises full-scale impregnations where thickness variations are measured with an advanced optical metrology system and the out-of-plane flow front is monitored by means of colour marks in the reinforcement stack. Experimental findings are then incorporated in a numerical model including moving boundaries and two-phase flow through porous media based on a commercial software for computational fluid dynamics.

  • 33. Andersson, Magnus
    Visualisation of composites manufacturing2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The five papers in this thesis demonstrate five unique ways to monitor composite manufacturing. They also clarify several phenomena that take place during composite manufacturing. Of particular interest are two manufacturing methods, namely vacuum infusion (Paper A-D) and compression moulding of SMC (Paper E). The former process is, for instance, used for large surface area parts such as wind-turbine blades. The concept is that a dry reinforcement is placed on a stiff mould half and covered with a flexible and airtight bag. The bag is then sealed to the mould except at certain positions being open for resin supplies and outlets. By keeping the pressure atmospheric at the resin inlets and reducing the pressure at one or several positions in the formed cavity, liquid resin is forced to impregnate the stack. A further result of the difference between the ambient pressure and the pressure within the cavity is a compaction force and a corresponding compression of the elastic stack. In compression moulding of SMC a charge consisting of a polymer, fillers and chopped fibres is placed in a heated and open mould. When the mould is closed, the charged material will fill the mould. This is a rapid process and it is therefore suitable for parts to the automotive industry. Exclusively, this thesis presents optical measurements of the full 3D position of the flow front during vacuum infusion moulding. Equally exceptional are field measurements made with a stereoscopic digital speckle photography system of the movement of the bag during moulding by the same manufacturing process. The actual results from these two measuring techniques are also very interesting. First of all is it clarified that there can be rather large gradients in the flow front with respect to the thickness direction enabling the formation of voids. Secondly it is shown that certain permeability measurements could be used to predict the flow front position during vacuum infusion while others fail. Thirdly it is confirmed that a ditch is formed at the resin flow front and that there can be a considerable and seemingly perpetual compaction after complete filling. Special attention has also been given to the advancing flow front during compression moulding of SMC. In this case the full complexity is captured by means of continuous high resolution close-up monitoring. From these visualisations three phases are defined, namely pitch, floating, and boiling. In the initial phase, pitch, outer layers do not remain outer layers, the actual flow is very complex and air is likely to be entrapped. In the second phase, floating, the flow is stable and seemingly viscous. In the last phase, boiling, bubbles are observed in the low pressure region at the flow front, favouring the formation of void both internally and on the surface. For vacuum infusion it is also essential to develop and evaluate new numerical visualisation tools. This is rather challenging since the impregnation is characterized by a full three-dimensional flow in a porous medium having an anisotropic, spatial- and time-dependent permeability. The new approach taken here is to implement such models in an all-purpose and commercial computational fluid dynamics software through custom written subroutines. The strategy has been to first verify and validate the modifications by 2D simulations and then demonstrate the full 3D capacity through one demonstrator.

  • 34. Andersson, Magnus
    Visualisation of the vacuum infusion process2003In: ICCM-14: 14th International Conference on Composite Materials : July 14-18, 2003, San Diego, California, USA, Dearborn, Mich: Society of Manufacturing Engineers, North American Manufacturing Research Institution, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35. Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Gebart, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Långström, R.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Development of guidelines for the vacuum infusion process2000In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Fibre Reinforced Composites, FRC 2000: Centre for Composite Materials Engineering, University of Newcastle, UK, 13 - 15 September 2000 / [ed] A. G. Gibson, Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Materials , 2000, 113-120 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current trend towards increased use of vacuum infusion moulding for large surface area parts has increased the interest for an advanced modelling of the process. This paper presents a detailed experimental investigation of laminate thickness and out-of-plane flow front shape during impregnation of high permeability reinforcement on top of a non-crimp fabric reinforcement lay-up. The goal with the experiments is to increase the understanding of the process and to provide accurate data that can later be used for validation of numerical models. The laminate thickness was measured during impregnation with a stereoscopic digital speckle photography system and the flow front shape was determined by tracking of colour marks in the stacking. The laminate lay-ups studied are different combinations of non-crimp fabrics and flow layers while the resin used was a polyester developed specifically for vacuum infusion moulding. Results are presented both for the instantaneous thickness and the flow front shape for several different material combinations. It was found that the skewness of the flow front became more pronounced with increasing number of flow layers when the number of non-crimp fabric layers was kept constant. As a first step towards a complete numerical model of the impregnation process a simplified model for the compressibility and a proven model for permeability was implemented in a commercial CFD package that can handle moving boundaries and moving flow fronts. Only a qualitative comparison with experiments was done but the conclusion was that the overall behaviour of the model was encouraging. A validation of the numerical model based on the measurements in this paper is under development.

  • 36. Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Gebart, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Numerical model for vacuum infusion manufacturing of polymer composites2003In: International journal of numerical methods for heat & fluid flow, ISSN 0961-5539, E-ISSN 1758-6585, Vol. 13, no 3, 383-394 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus is set on the development and evaluation of a numerical mgodel describing the impregnation stage of a method to manufacture fibre reinforced polymer composites, namely the vacuum infusion process. Examples of items made with this process are hulls to sailing yachts and containers for the transportation industry. The impregnation is characterised by a full 3D flow in a porous medium having an anisotropic, spatial- and time-dependent permeability. The numerical model has been implemented in a general and commercial computational fluid dynamic software through custom written subroutines that: couple the flow equations to the equations describing the stiffness of the fibre reinforcement; modify the momentum equations to account for the porous medium flow; remesh the computational domain in each time step to account for the deformation by pressure change. The verification of the code showed excellent agreement with analytical solutions and very good agreement with experiments. The numerical model can easily be extended to more complex geometry and to other constitutive equations for the permeability and the compressibility of the reinforcement.

  • 37. Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Gebart, Rikard
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Långström, R.
    Swedish Institute of Composites, Piteå.
    Flow-enhancing layers in the vacuum infusion process2002In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 23, no 5, 895-901 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current trend towards increased use of vacuum infusion molding for large surface-area parts has increased the interest in an advanced modeling of the process. Because the driving pressure is limited to 1 atmosphere, it is essential to evaluate possible ways to accelerate the impregnation. One way of doing this is to use layers of higher permeability within the reinforcing stack, i.e. flow-enhancing layers. We present an experimental investigation of the flow front shape when using such layers. The through-thickness flow front was observed by making a number of color marks on the glass-mats forming the reinforcing stack, which became visible when the resin reached their position. The in-plane flow front was derived from observations of the uppermost layer. It turned out that existing analytical models agree very well with the experiments if effective permeability data is used, that is, permeability obtained from vacuum infusions. However, the fill-time was nearly twice as long as predicted from permeability data obtained in a stiff tool. This rather large discrepancy may be due to certain features of a flexible mold half and is therefore a topic for further research. The lead-lag to final thickness ratio is dependent on the position of the flow front and ranges form 5 to 10 for the cases tested. Interestingly the lead-lag has a miximum close to the inlet.

  • 38. Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Langhans, N.
    EADS Military Aircraft, Munich.
    Computational fluid dynamics applied to the vacuum infusion process2005In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 26, no 2, 231-239 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An all-purpose computational fluid dynamics software is used for simulations of the vacuum infusion process. The study comprises simulations of a full three-dimensional two-phase flow through a porous medium. The medium that has an anisotropic, spatial- and time-dependent permeability is located in a complex mold with moving boundaries. With this generalization, different material combinations, processing conditions, and even other manufacturing techniques can be evaluated. The strength of the presented approach is exemplified by simulations of mold filling of a real part, using a typical vacuum infusion set-up. In addition to the overall development of the model, a number of specific aspects and phenomena are investigated and evaluated. Local lead of the flow front and a minor influence in overall flow front lead-lag, with no influence on the fill time, is the result of simulations of edge effects due to poor preform fitting.

  • 39. Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Lundström, Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Langhans, N.
    Numerical simulation of the vacuum infusion process2006In: Experimental techniques and design in composite materials (ETDCM6): "Sixth International Seminar on Experimental Techniques and Design in Composite Materials" which was held at Padova in June 2003 / [ed] Marino Quaresimin, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Andersson, Robin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics.
    Flow Over Large-Scale Naturally Rough Surfaces2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fluid mechanical field of rough surface flows has been developed ever since the first experiments by Haagen (1854) and Darcy (1857). Although old, the area still holds merit and a surprising amount of information have to this day yet to be fully understood, which surely is a proof of its complexity. Many equations and CFD tools still rely on old, albeit reliable, concepts for simplifying the flow to be able to handle the effects of surface roughness. This notion is, however, likely to change within a not so unforeseeable future. The advancement of computer power has opened the door for more advanced CFD tools such as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES). It can be argued that once a given flow situation has been fully accessible by numerical simulations, it is likely to be fully understood within a few years 1 . However, DNS is still limited to small scales of roughness and relatively low Reynolds number which is in contrast with given hydropower conditions today. The hydropower industry annually supplies Sweden with about 45% of its electricity production, and tunnels of various types are regularly used for conveying water to or from turbines within hydropower stations. The tunnels are a vital part of the system and their survival is of the essence. Depending on the manner of excavation, the walls of the tunnels regularly exhibit a roughness, this roughness may range from a few mm to m, which is true especially if the tunnel have been subjected to damage. For natural roughness e.g. hydropower tunnels, there is no clear way to distinguish between rough surface flows and flow past obstacles. Yet, to be able to distinguish between the two cases has proven to be important. This work is aimed to increase the understanding of how the wall roughness affects the flow, and how to treat it numerically. Paper A employs the use of pressure sensors to evaluate local deviations in pressure as well as head loss due to the surface roughness. Paper B is aimed at using PIV to evaluate the flow using averaging techniques and characteristic length scales. Paper C Further investigates the data from the PIV and pressure measurements and Evaluates the possibility to use basic but versatile turbulence models to evaluate the flow in such tunnels.

  • 41.
    Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andersson, Anders G.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Vattenfall Research & Development.
    Hellström, J. Gunnar I.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Lundström, T. Staffan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Grade of geometric resolution of a rough surface required for accurate prediction of pressure and velocities in water tunnels2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Andersson, Robin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Larsson, Sofia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Hellström, Gunnar
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andreasson, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Andersson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Experimental Study of Head Loss over Laser Scanned Rock Tunnel2016In: Experimental Study of Head Loss over Laser Scanned Rock Tunnel: Hydraulic Structures and Water System Management, ISHS 2016, Portland, United States, 27 - 30 June 2016, Portland: Utah State University , 2016, 22-29 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow in hydropower tunnels is characterized by a high Reynolds number and often very rough rock walls. Due to the roughness of the walls, the flow in the tunnel is highly disturbed, resulting in large fluctuations of velocity and pressure in both time and space. Erosion problems and even partial collapse of tunnel walls are in some cases believed to be caused by hydraulic jacking from large flow induced pressure fluctuations. The objective of this work is to investigate the effects of the rough walls on the pressure variations in time and space over the rock surfaces. Pressure measurement experiments were performed in a 10 m long Plexiglas tunnel where one of the smooth walls was replaced with a rough surface. The rough surface was created from a down-scaled (1:10) laser scanned wall of a hydraulic tunnel. The differential pressure was measured at the smooth surface between points placed at the start and end of the first four 2 m sections of the channel. 10 gauge pressure sensors where flush mounted on the rough surface; these sensors measure the magnitude and the fluctuations of the pressure on the rough surface. The measurements showed significant spatial variation of the pressure on the surface. For example, sensors placed on protruding roughness elements showed low gauge pressure but high fluctuations. The differential pressure indicated a head loss through the tunnel that was almost four times higher than a theoretical smooth channel.

  • 43.
    Andersson, Urban
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    An exerimental study of the flow in a sharp-heel draft tube2000Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the Turbine 99 Draft Tube experiments is to provide extensive experimental data on a well-defined sharp-heel draft-tube flow. The data bank has served as calibration data for the simulation challenge presented by the Turbine 99 workshop in Porjus in June 1999. This thesis gives some background on draft-tube flows in general and discusses in some detail the parameters and flow conditions relevant to the Turbine 99 draft tube. Some comments on the research and development conducted so far in the project and future plans are given at the end. In the three accompanying papers, details of the developments and the scientific results are presented: Paper 1. Presents the scope of the work and some initial results from the measurements Paper 2. Discusses the quality of the measurements Paper 3. Presents some of the results from the measurements

  • 44.
    Andersson, Urban
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    An experimental study of the flow in a sharp-heel Kaplan draft tube2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research project was originally part of a package (Turbine-99 Draft Tube) that had a mutual goal, to improve the understanding of draft tube flow and establish Best Practise Guidelines for simulation of draft tube flow.The draft tube is situated after the runner in a Hydropower turbine to recover as much of the remaining head and kinetic energy as possible before the water leaves the turbine. The case is fully turbulent, and because of the adverse pressure gradient with risk for separation, periodic inlet conditions from the runner with different degrees of swirl causes the draft tube flow to be difficult to predict. Therefore, unambiguous design criterions are lacking, and the slightly contradicting recommendations indicate that the standard rules give conservative, rather than optimal, designs. This thesis gives some background on draft-tube flows in general and discusses the parameters and flow conditions relevant to the Turbine-99 draft tube in some detail. The main goal of the thesis is to provide extensive experimental data on a well-defined sharp-heel draft-tube flow. The data bank has served as validation data for the simulation challenge presented by the Turbine-99 workshops in Porjus (June 1999), Älvkarleby (June 2001) and Porjus (December 2005).The experimental data and some numerical results are also available as an application challenge in the Qnet database (managed by Ercoftac), as a validation case for flow simulations.The experimental data consists of visualisations, pressure measurements and velocity measurements. These methods give a good qualitative picture of the flow pattern in the draft tube with quantitative data at selected cross section that can be used to validate the flow simulations. The first two workshops focused on mean quantities of pressure and velocities; however, phase resolved measurements have been added to add value to the experimental data.In addition to the experimental validation case, there is one paper that deals with loads on the draft tube, which affect the construction lifetime. Since the hydropower stations are expected to have a long total technical lifetime with a number of refurbishments, these questions will grow in importance over the next decades.

  • 45.
    Andersson, Urban
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Turbine-99 - Experiments on Draft Tube Flow (Test Case T)2000In: Proceedings of Turbine-99: Workshop on draft tube flow / [ed] B. Rikard Gebart, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Andersson, Urban
    et al.
    Vattenfall Research & Development.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Phase resolved velocity measurements at the draft tube cone of the turbine-99 test case2008In: Hydro technology and the evironment for the new century: 24th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems, October 27 - 31, 2008, Foz do Iguassu, Brazil, Foz do Iguassu, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Turbine-99 test case, a Kaplan draft tube, has been studied extensively both experimentally and numerically. To further complete the experimental data of this test case, phase resolved velocity profiles in the draft tube cone are presented in this paper. The phase resolved velocity profiles have been measured with a 2-component LDA equipment measuring both the tangential and the axial velocity components of the flow. The measurements were synchronised with a pulse from the runner shaft that gives the angular position/phase of each velocity measurement. The result shows a clear impact of the runner blade wakes on the flow distribution in the draft tube cone. Further down in the cone the blade wakes are still visible, even if noticeable weaker, and they have increased their extent in the tangential direction.

  • 47. Andersson, Urban
    et al.
    Engström, Fredrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Sustainable Process Engineering.
    Gustavsson, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    Karlsson, Rolf
    Vattenfall Research & Development.
    The Turbine-99 workshops - conclusions and recommendations2004In: 22nd IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems, Stockholm, Sweden, June 29 - July 2, 2004, Stockholm: IAHR , 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Andersson, Urban
    et al.
    Vattenfall Research & Development.
    Jungstedt, J.
    Vattenfall Research & Development.
    Cervantes, Michel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.
    A model experiment of dynamic loads on a draft tube pier2008In: Hydro technology and the evironment for the new century: 24th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems, October 27 - 31, 2008, Foz do Iguassu, Brazil, Foz do Iguassu, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cracks on the pier of large draft tubes have occurred causing stand-still and repair of two large twin stations Porjus G11 and G12. In order to understand the mechanism behind the formation of the cracks, a research programme was initiated at Vattenfall. Measurements were performed on a prototype as well structural analysis (FEM). In order to corroborate some findings, get detailed information of the load on the pier and identify critical operating conditions, model tests were performed at the Hydraulic Machinery Laboratory of Vattenfall Research and Development, Älvkarleby, Sweden. An adjustable draft tube pier with several pressure holes was used to estimate the load acting on the pier. The tests did not indicate any operating point that would cause direct braking, but possible fatigue problems. At part load the pressure was considerably higher on one side of the pier. The pressure difference decreases with increased flow, and change high-pressure side at full load. Efficiency measurements and visualization did not show any impact of the angle bars installed in the year 2000 to strength the structure.

  • 49. Andersson, Urban
    et al.
    Karlsson, Rolf
    Vattenfall Research & Development.
    Quality aspects of the Turbine 99 draft tube experiment2000In: Proceedings of Turbine-99: Workshop on draft tube flow / [ed] B. Rikard Gebart, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Asplund, Matthias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Rantatalo, Matti
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Johnsson, Roger
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Hiensch, Martin
    Combating curve squeal noise2016In: Combating curve squeal noise, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Society demand for more sustainable transports is increasing, starting a modal shift from road to railway. The resulting increase in railway traffic intensity is leading to more activities on the track, even during the night time. For many years continuous urbanization has been resulting in a higher density of residents in areas close to railway tracks. The combination of these factors is raising the issue of noise disturbances from railway transports, which is forcing infrastructure managers to take action to combat noise from railway traffic systematically. There are different types of noise emanating from railways and one of the most annoying is curve squeal noise. This paper deals with the curve squeal phenomenon, the places where it occurs, and different methods for reducing it. The curving behaviour of a vehicle plays an important role in the generation of curve squeals, and therefore the way in which different rail profiles affect the capability to steer in a sharp curve is dealt within this paper. The paper is based on two case studies with investigated curves in urban regions that suffer from squeal noise, and in which comparisons between measurements and simulations were performed. The outcome of these studies is a workflow for combating squeal noise, results concerning the effects of a top-of-rail friction modifier on noise mitigation, and a proposed rail profiles for improving the steering capability of vehicles.

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