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  • 1.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Marbuah, George
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mubanga, Mwenya
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Climate variability and infectious diseases nexus: Evidence from Sweden2017In: Infectious Disease Modelling, ISSN 2468-0427, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 203-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies on the link between climate variability and infectious diseases are based on biophysical experiments, do not account for socio-economic factors and with little focus on developed countries. This study examines the effect of climate variability and socio-economic variables on infectious diseases using data from all 21 Swedish counties. Employing static and dynamic modelling frameworks, we observe that temperature has a linear negative effect on the number of patients. The relationship between winter temperature and the number of patients is non-linear and “U” shaped in the static model. Conversely, a positive effect of precipitation on the number of patients is found, with modest heterogeneity in the effect of climate variables on the number of patients across disease classifications observed. The effect of education and number of health personnel explain the number of patients in a similar direction (negative), while population density and immigration drive up reported cases. Income explains this phenomenon non-linearly. In the dynamic setting, we found significant persistence in the number of infectious and parasitic-diseased patients, with temperature and income observed as the only significant drivers.

  • 2.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Sapountzaki, Eleftheria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Rova, Ulrika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Inhibition of the main protease of SARS-CoV-2 (Mpro) by repurposing/designing drug-like substances and utilizing nature’s toolbox of bioactive compounds2022In: Computational and Structural Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 2001-0370, Vol. 20, p. 1306-1344Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in a long pandemic, with numerous cases and victims worldwide and enormous consequences on social and economic life. Although vaccinations have proceeded and provide a valuable shield against the virus, the approved drugs are limited and it is crucial that further ways to combat infection are developed, that can also act against potential mutations. The main protease (Mpro) of the virus is an appealing target for the development of inhibitors, due to its importance in the viral life cycle and its high conservation among different coronaviruses. Several compounds have shown inhibitory potential against Mpro, both in silico and in vitro, with few of them also having entered clinical trials. These candidates include: known drugs that have been repurposed, molecules specifically designed based on the natural substrate of the protease or on structural moieties that have shown high binding affinity to the protease active site, as well as naturally derived compounds, either isolated or in plant extracts. The aim of this work is to collectively present the results of research regarding Mpro inhibitors to date, focusing on the function of the compounds founded by in silico simulations and further explored by in vitro and in vivo assays. Creating an extended portfolio of promising compounds that may block viral replication by inhibiting Mpro and by understanding involved structure–activity relationships, could provide a basis for the development of effective solutions against SARS-CoV-2 and future related outbreaks.

  • 3.
    Fredsgaard, Malthe
    et al.
    AAU Energy, Aalborg University, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Kaniki, Samba Evelyne Kabemba
    AAU Energy, Aalborg University, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Antonopoulou, Io
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Chaturvedi, Tanmay
    AAU Energy, Aalborg University, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard
    AAU Energy, Aalborg University, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Phenolic Compounds in Salicornia spp. and Their Potential Therapeutic Effects on H1N1, HBV, HCV, and HIV: A Review2023In: Molecules, ISSN 1431-5157, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 28, no 14, article id 5312Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite public health risk mitigation measures and regulation efforts by many countries, regions, and sectors, viral outbreaks remind the world of our vulnerability to biological hazards and the importance of mitigation actions. The saltwater-tolerant plants in the Salicornia genus belonging to the Amaranthaceae family are widely recognized and researched as producers of clinically applicable phytochemicals. The plants in the Salicornia genus contain flavonoids, flavonoid glycosides, and hydroxycinnamic acids, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, apigenin, kaempferol, quercetin, isorhamnetin, myricetin, isoquercitrin, and myricitrin, which have all been shown to support the antiviral, virucidal, and symptom-suppressing activities. Their potential pharmacological usefulness as therapeutic medicine against viral infections has been suggested in many studies, where recent studies suggest these phenolic compounds may have pharmacological potential as therapeutic medicine against viral infections. This study reviews the antiviral effects, the mechanisms of action, and the potential as antiviral agents of the aforementioned phenolic compounds found in Salicornia spp. against an influenza A strain (H1N1), hepatitis B and C (HBV/HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), as no other literature has described these effects from the Salicornia genus at the time of publication. This review has the potential to have a significant societal impact by proposing the development of new antiviral nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals derived from phenolic-rich formulations found in the edible Salicornia spp. These formulations could be utilized as a novel strategy by which to combat viral pandemics caused by H1N1, HBV, HCV, and HIV-1. The findings of this review indicate that isoquercitrin, myricetin, and myricitrin from Salicornia spp. have the potential to exhibit high efficiency in inhibiting viral infections. Myricetin exhibits inhibition of H1N1 plaque formation and reverse transcriptase, as well as integrase integration and cleavage. Isoquercitrin shows excellent neuraminidase inhibition. Myricitrin inhibits HIV-1 in infected cells. Extracts of biomass in the Salicornia genus could contribute to the development of more effective and efficient measures against viral infections and, ultimately, improve public health.

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  • 4.
    Giron, Carolina Corrêa
    et al.
    Departamento de Ciências Biomoleculares, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil; Hospital de Clínicas, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, Brazil.
    Laaksonen, Aatto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. Arrhenius Laboratory, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, China; Centre of Advanced Research in Bionanoconjugates and Biopolymers, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi, Romania.
    Barroso da Silva, Fernando Luís
    Departamento de Ciências Biomoleculares, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, United States.
    Up State of the SARS-COV-2 Spike Homotrimer Favors an Increased Virulence for New Variants2021In: Frontiers in Medical Technology, E-ISSN 2673-3129, Vol. 3, article id 694347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has spread worldwide. However, as soon as the first vaccines—the only scientifically verified and efficient therapeutic option thus far—were released, mutations combined into variants of SARS-CoV-2 that are more transmissible and virulent emerged, raising doubts about their efficiency. This study aims to explain possible molecular mechanisms responsible for the increased transmissibility and the increased rate of hospitalizations related to the new variants. A combination of theoretical methods was employed. Constant-pH Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to quantify the stability of several spike trimeric structures at different conformational states and the free energy of interactions between the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and angiotensin-converting enzyme II (ACE2) for the most worrying variants. Electrostatic epitopes were mapped using the PROCEEDpKa method. These analyses showed that the increased virulence is more likely to be due to the improved stability to the S trimer in the opened state, in which the virus can interact with the cellular receptor, ACE2, rather than due to alterations in the complexation RBD-ACE2, since the difference observed in the free energy values was small (although more attractive in general). Conversely, the South African/Beta variant (B.1.351), compared with the SARS-CoV-2 wild type (wt), is much more stable in the opened state with one or two RBDs in the up position than in the closed state with three RBDs in the down position favoring the infection. Such results contribute to understanding the natural history of disease and indicate possible strategies for developing new therapeutic molecules and adjusting the vaccine doses for higher B-cell antibody production.

  • 5.
    Isaksson, Frida
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Lundy, Lian
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Székely, Anna J.
    Department of Aquatic Science and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Department of Aquatic Science and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Evaluating the Use of Alternative Normalization Approaches on SARS-CoV-2 Concentrations in Wastewater: Experiences from Two Catchments in Northern Sweden2022In: Environments, E-ISSN 2076-3298, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA fragments in feces has paved the way for wastewater-based epidemiology to contribute to COVID-19 mitigation measures, with its use in a public health context still under development. As a way to facilitate data comparison, this paper explores the impact of using alternative normalization approaches (wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) flow, population size estimates (derived using total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and census data) and pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV)) on the relationship between viral wastewater data and clinical case numbers. Influent wastewater samples were collected at two WWTPs in Luleå, northern Sweden, between January and March 2021. TN and TP were determined upon sample collection, with RNA analysis undertaken on samples after one freeze–thaw cycle. The strength of the correlation between normalization approaches and clinical cases differed between WWTPs (r ≤ 0.73 or r ≥ 0.78 at the larger WWTP and r ≤ 0.23 or r ≥ 0.43 at the smaller WWTP), indicating that the use of wastewater as an epidemiological tool is context-dependent. Depending on the normalization approach utilized, time-shifted analyses imply that wastewater data on SARS-CoV-2 RNA pre-dated a rise in clinical cases by 0–2 and 5–8 days, for the lager and smaller WWTPs, respectively. SARS-CoV-2 viral loads normalized to the population or PMMoV better reflect the number of clinical cases when comparing wastewater data between sewer catchments.

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  • 6.
    Khayamian, Mohammad Ali
    et al.
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran 11155-4563, Iran.
    Parizi, Mohammad Salemizadeh
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran.
    Ghaderinia, Mohammadreza
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran.
    Abadijoo, Hamed
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran.
    Vanaei, Shohreh
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;School of Biology, College of Science, University of Tehran, P. O. Box: 14155-6655, Tehran, Iran.
    Simaee, Hossein
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Integrative Oncology Department, Breast Cancer Research Center, Motamed Cancer Institute, ACECR, Tehran, Iran.
    Abdolhosseini, Saeed
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran.
    Shalileh, Shahriar
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran.
    Faramarzpour, Mahsa
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran.
    Fadaei Naeini, Vahid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements. School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran 11155-4563, Iran.
    Hoseinpour, Parisa
    SEPAS Pathology Lab, P. O. Box 1991945391, Tehran, Iran.
    Shojaeian, Fatemeh
    Imam Hossein Clinical Research Development Center, Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Abbasvandi, Fereshteh
    ATMP Department, Breast Cancer Research Center, Motamed Cancer Institute, ACECR, P. O. Box 15179/64311, Tehran, Iran.
    Abdolahad, Mohammad
    Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nano Electronics Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P. O. Box 14395/515, Tehran, Iran;Cancer Institute, Imam-Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P. O. Box 13145-158, Tehran, Iran;UT&TUMS Cancer electronic Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    A label-free graphene-based impedimetric biosensor for real-time tracing of the cytokine storm in blood serum; suitable for screening COVID-19 patients2021In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 11, no 55, p. 34503-34515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concurrent with the pandemic announcement of SARS-CoV-2 infection by the WHO, a variety of reports were published confirming the cytokine storm as the most mortal effect of the virus on the infected patients. Hence, cytokine storm as an evidenced consequence in most of the COVID-19 patients could offer a promising opportunity to use blood as a disease progression marker. Here, we have developed a rapid electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) sensor for quantifying the overall immune activity of the patients. Since during the cytokine storm many types of cytokines are elevated in the blood, there is no need for specific detection of a single type of cytokine and the collective behavior is just measured without any electrode functionalization. The sensor includes a monolayer graphene on a copper substrate as the working electrode (WE) which is able to distinguish between the early and severe stage of the infected patients. The charge transfer resistance (RCT) in the moderate and severe cases varies about 65% and 138% compared to the normal groups, respectively and a specificity of 77% and sensitivity of 100% based on ELISA results were achieved. The outcomes demonstrate a significant correlation between the total mass of the three main hypercytokinemia associated cytokines including IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ in patients and the RCT values. As an extra application, the biosensor's capability for diagnosis of COVID-19 patients was tested and a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 50% were obtained compared to the RT-PCR results.

  • 7.
    Malm, Christer
    Luleå University of Technology. Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Susceptibility to infections in elite athletes: The S-curve2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 4-6Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) after physical exercise has been described with a J-shaped curve, suggesting protection from infections with moderate exercise and increased risk for URTI's in elite athletes. Several factors such as time of inoculation, previous infections, pathogen exposure, other stressors than exercise etc. can influence infection outcome. Observed infections in athletes can, therefore, be either the result of increased susceptibility to a novel pathogen, or more severe symptoms of an already established infection. Moreover, the definitions of "strenuous" exercise and "elite" athletes are equivocal, making comparisons between studies difficult. Because absence of infections is inevitable to become and maintain status as an elite athlete, it is suggested that there is an S-shaped relationship between exercise load and risk of infections. To become an elite athlete one has to possess state-of-the-art physique, including an immune system able to withstand infections even during severe physiological and psychological stress.

  • 8.
    Nordmark, Catrin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Harnesk Juntti, Elin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Learning and Technology.
    Sjuksköterskors upplevelse av sin psykiska hälsa under Covid-19 pandemin2022Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: I slutet av 2019 upptäcktes ett nytt virus som fick namnet Covid-19. Viruset  orsakade  allvarlig  respiratorisk  sjukdomsbild  med  feber,  hosta  och andningssvårigheter.  Våren  2020  klassades  sjukdomsspridningen  som  en pandemi.  Antalet  insjuknade  steg  drastiskt vilket  medförde  hög  belastning på hälso- och sjukvården. Syfte: Att beskriva sjuksköterskors upplevelse av sin psykiska hälsa under Covid-19  pandemin. Metod: 19  kvalitativa  artiklar  analyserades  med  kvalitativ innehållsanalys  med  manifest  ansats.  Resultat:  Analysen  resulterade  i  fem kategorier:  Att  känna  psykisk  stress  av  förändringar  i  arbetsmiljön,  att  känna ångest över att bli smittad eller smitta andra, att känna skuld och sorg i patientnära arbetet,  att  känna  sig  psykologiskt  nedbruten  och  deprimerad och  att  känna välbefinnande  och  stolthet  i  sitt  yrke. Diskussion/slutsats: Sjuksköterskornas psykiska  hälsa  påverkades  negativt men även  positiva  aspekter  framkom. Sjuksköterskors psykiska hälsa och arbetsförhållanden behöver uppmärksammas. Fortsatt forskning kan bidra till att utveckla stöd att förbättra och förbygga psykisk ohälsa hos sjuksköterskor.

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  • 9.
    Parsonage, Ben
    et al.
    Department of Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Hägglund, Philip K.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Keogh, Lloyd
    Department of Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Wheelhouse, Nick
    School of Applied Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Brown, Richard E.
    Department of Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Sophrodyne Ltd., Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Dancer, Stephanie J.
    School of Applied Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Department of Microbiology, Hairmyres Hospital, NHS Lanarkshire, Bothwell, United Kingdom.
    Control of antimicrobial resistance requires an ethical approach2017In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 8, no NOV, article id 2124Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethical behavior encompasses actions that benefit both self and society. This means that tackling antimicrobial resistance (AMR) becomes an ethical obligation, because the prospect of declining anti-infectives affects everyone. Without preventive action, loss of drugs that have saved lives over the past century, will condemn ourselves, people we know, and people we don't know, to unacceptable risk of untreatable infection. Policies aimed at extending antimicrobial life should be considered within an ethical framework, in order to balance the choice, range, and quality of drugs against stewardship activities. Conserving availability and effectiveness for future use should not compromise today's patients. Practices such as antimicrobial prophylaxis for healthy people 'at risk' should receive full debate. There are additional ethical considerations for AMR involving veterinary care, agriculture, and relevant bio-industries. Restrictions for farmers potentially threaten the quality and quantity of food production with economic consequences. Antibiotics for companion animals do not necessarily spare those used for humans. While low-income countries cannot afford much-needed drugs, pharmaceutical companies are reluctant to develop novel agents for short-term return only. Public demand encourages over-the-counter, internet, black market, and counterfeit drugs, all of which compromise international control. Prescribers themselves require educational support to balance therapeutic choice against collateral damage to both body and environment. Predicted mortality due to AMR provides justification for international co-operation, commitment and investment to support surveillance and stewardship along with development of novel antimicrobial drugs. Ethical arguments for, and against, control of antimicrobial resistance strategies are presented and discussed in this review.

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  • 10.
    Rizwana, Tayyeba
    et al.
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Kothidar, Akansha
    Centre for Human Microbial Ecology, Translational Health Science and Technology Institute, Faridabad, Haryana, India.
    Meghwani, Himanshu
    Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.
    Sharma, Vaibhav
    Department of Biophysics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Shobhawat, Rahul
    Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
    Saini, Rajpal
    Department of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematical Sciences, University of Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Vaishnav, Hemendra Kumar
    Operations Management, Quantitative Methods and Information Systems Area, Indian Institute of Management Udaipur, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India.
    Singh, Vikramaditya
    CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, New Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Pratap, Mukut
    Department of Biochemistry, Central University of Rajasthan, Ajmer, Rajasthan, India.
    Sihag, Hitaishi
    Department of Biochemistry, Central University of Rajasthan, Ajmer, Rajasthan, India.
    Kumar, Shakti
    Centre for Human Microbial Ecology, Translational Health Science and Technology Institute, Faridabad, Haryana, India.
    Dey, Joy Kumar
    Central Council for Research in Homoeopathy, Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India, New Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Dey, Sanjay Kumar
    Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Center for Biomedical Research, University of Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi, India.
    Comparative analysis of SARS-CoV-2 envelope viroporin mutations from COVID-19 deceased and surviving patients revealed implications on its ion-channel activities and correlation with patient mortality2022In: Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics, ISSN 0739-1102, E-ISSN 1538-0254, Vol. 40, no 20, p. 10454-10469Article in journal (Refereed)
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