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  • 1.
    Ammara, Sumbal
    et al.
    Environmental Science Program, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, International Islamic University, Islamabad, 44000, Pakistan.
    Rafiq, Muhammad Tariq
    Environmental Science Program, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, International Islamic University, Islamabad, 44000, Pakistan.
    Aziz, Rukhsanda
    Environmental Science Program, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, International Islamic University, Islamabad, 44000, Pakistan.
    Feng, Ying
    Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecological Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, China.
    Mehmood, Sultan
    Horticultural Research Institute, National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad, 44000, Pakistan.
    Taneez, Mehwish
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Suhaib, Muhammad
    Land Resources Research Institute, National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad, 44000, Pakistan.
    Asif, Fatima
    Environmental Science Program, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, International Islamic University, Islamabad, 44000, Pakistan.
    Nickel uptake in leafy greens from contaminated soil: an investigation into phytoavailability and health risk assessment using in vitro digestion model2024In: Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, ISSN 0167-6369, E-ISSN 1573-2959, Vol. 196, no 2, article id 171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Elragal, Rawan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Digital Services and Systems.
    Elragal, Ahmed
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Digital Services and Systems.
    Habibipour, Abdolrasoul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Digital Services and Systems.
    Food Analytics – A Literature Review and Ways Forward2024In: 2024 23rd International Symposium INFOTEH-JAHORINA (INFOTEH): Proceedings, 2024Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kollander, Barbro
    et al.
    Swedish Food Agency, SE-751 26 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Scandinavia AB, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden.
    Sundström, Birgitta
    Swedish Food Agency, SE-751 26 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Multi-Element Assessment of Potentially Toxic and Essential Elements in New and Traditional Food Varieties in Sweden2023In: Foods, ISSN 2304-8158, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 1831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the global movement toward the consumption of a more sustainable diet that includes a higher proportion of plant-based foods, it is important to determine how such a change could alter the intake of cadmium and other elements, both essential and toxic. In this study, we report on the levels of a wide range of elements in foodstuffs that are both traditional and “new” to the Swedish market. The data were obtained using analytical methods providing very low detection limits and include market basket data for different food groups to provide the general levels in foods consumed in Sweden and to facilitate comparisons among traditional and “new” food items. This dataset could be used to estimate changes in nutritional intake as well as exposure associated with a change in diet. The concentrations of known toxic and essential elements are provided for all the food matrices studied. Moreover, the concentrations of less routinely analyzed elements are available in some matrices. Depending on the food variety, the dataset includes the concentrations of inorganic arsenic and up to 74 elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hf, Hg, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Ta, Te, Th, Ti, Tl, U, W, V, Y, Zn, Zr, rare Earth elements (REEs) (Ce, Dy, Er, Eu, Gd, Ho, La, Lu, Nd, Pr, Sm, Tb, Tm, and Yb), platinum group elements (PGEs) (Ir, Os, Pd, Pr, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, and Pr), and halogens (Br, Cl, and I)). The main focus (and thus the most detailed information on variation within a given food group) is on foods that are currently the largest contributors to dietary cadmium exposure in Sweden, such as pasta, rice, potato products, and different sorts of bread. Additionally, elemental concentrations in selected food varieties regarded as relatively new or “novel” to the Swedish market are provided, including teff flour, chia seeds, algae products, and gluten-free products. 

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  • 4.
    Lagerkvist, Carl Johan
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mensah, Justice Tei
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    How consumer confidence in food safety practices along the food supply chain determines food handling practices: Evidence from Ghana2018In: Food Control, ISSN 0956-7135, E-ISSN 1873-7129, Vol. 93, p. 265-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between consumer confidence in food safety measures for vegetables sold in open markets and their use of safe food handling practices in the domestic environment was investigated for a set of 332 randomly sampled vegetable consumers within the suburbs of Accra, Ghana. More specifically, the confidence of consumers in twelve food safety measures employed by farmers, middlemen and traders was assessed, together with the frequency of treatment of vegetables with salt or vinegar and whether or not vegetables were stored in a hygienic and ventilated place. The results suggest that the level of consumer confidence in food safety measures along the value chain of vegetable production influences their food safety actions. Principal component analysis identified two factors determining confidence: (a) cleanliness and contact exposure, and (b) safe practices related to water, pesticides and fertilisers in production and general hygiene at the selling point. Structural equation modelling showed that confidence was significantly related to the cleanliness and contact exposure component (path coefficient = 0.41, p = 0.002), but only indirectly to the safe production practices and hygiene component (r = 0.71). Moreover, confidence then directed storage (path coefficient = 0.54, p < 0.001), but impaired use of salt or vinegar (path coefficient = −0.29, p = 0.0015). Furthermore, multinomial logit modelling revealed a significant association between delayed vegetable consumption and frequency of treatment of vegetables with salt or vinegar before cooking or eating (χ2 = 13.2, p < 0.05). It also showed that the marginal effects of changes in the two principal components of confidence operated differently for groups of consumers who differed in their combined use of storage and treatment. These findings have implications for food risk communication and actions to improve local conditions under which food is sold.

  • 5.
    Matsakas, Leonidas
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 5 Iroon Polytechniou Str, Zografou Campus, Athens, 15780, Greece.
    Kekos, Dimitris
    Biotechnology Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 5 Iroon Polytechniou Str, Zografou Campus, Athens, 15780, Greece.
    Loizidou, Maria
    Unit of Environmental Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 5, Iroon Polytechniou Str, Zografou Campus, Athens, 15780, Greece.
    Christakopoulos, Paul
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Utilization of Household Food Waste for the Production of Ethanol at High Dry Material Content2015In: Solid Waste as a Renewable Resource: Methodologies / [ed] Jimmy Alexander Faria Albanese; M. Pilar Ruiz, Taylor & Francis, 2015, 1, p. 35-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Mehariya, Sanjeet
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Plöhn, Martin
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Leon-Vaz, Antonio
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Laboratory of Biochemistry, University of Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
    Patel, Alok
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Funk, Christiane
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Improving the content of high value compounds in Nordic Desmodesmus microalgal strains2022In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 359, article id 127445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nordic Desmodesmus microalgal strains (2-6) and (RUC-2) were exposed to abiotic stress (light and salt) to enhance lipids and carotenoids. The biomass output of both strains increased by more than 50% during light stress of 800 μmol m-2 s-1 compared to control light. The biomass of Desmodesmus sp. (2-6) contained most lipids (15% of dry weight) and total carotenoids (16.6 mg g-1) when grown at moderate light stress (400 μmol m-2 s-1), which further could be enhanced up to 2.5-fold by salinity stress. Desmodesmus sp. (RUC-2) exhibited maximal lipid (26.5%) and carotenoid (43.8 mg L-1) content at light intensities of 400 and 100 μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. Salinity stress stimulated lipid accumulation by 39%. Nordic Desmodesmus strains therefore are not only able to tolerate stress conditions, but their biomass considerably improves under stress. These strains have high potential to be used in algal bio-factories on low-cost medium like Baltic seawater.

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