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  • 1.
    Allard, Christina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Curran, Deborah
    Faculty of Law and School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
    Indigenous Influence and Engagement in Mining Permitting in British Columbia, Canada: Lessons for Sweden and Norway?2023In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mine developments in Indigenous territories risk disrupting Indigenous cultures and their economies, including spiraling already high levels of conflict. This is the situation in Canada, Sweden, and Norway, as elsewhere, and is fostered by current state legal framework that reflect historical trajectories, although circumstances are gradually changing. Promising institutional changes have taken place in British Columbia (BC), Canada, with respect to new legislative reforms. Notably, new legislation from 2019 intends to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in the province, by promoting consent-based and collaborative decision-making mechanisms. New environmental assessment legislation is another example; this legislation includes early engagement, collaborative decision-making, and Indigenous-led assessments. The article’s aim is, first, to analyze how Indigenous communities can influence and engage in the mining permitting system of BC, and, secondly, to highlight the positive features of the BC system using a comparative lens to identify opportunities for Sweden and Norway regarding mining permitting and Indigenous rights. Applying a legal-scientific and comparative analysis, the article analyzes traditional legal sources. The article concludes that the strong points that the BC regime could offer the two Nordic countries are: the concept of reconciliation, incorporation of UNDRIP, the spectrum of consultation and engagement approaches, and the structure of environmental assessments. All three jurisdictions, however, struggle with balancing mine developments and securing Indigenous authority and influence over land uses in their traditional territories.

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  • 2.
    Barratt, Tom
    et al.
    Management and Organisations, Business School, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Sandström, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Ellem, Bradon
    Work and Organisational Studies, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Remaking the socio-spatial fix: Actors, time and crisis in two iron ore towns2024In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ‘spatial fix’ has been central to economic geography for nearly 50 years, examining capitalist development through both stability and change. Harvey’s original conceptions of the fix prioritised capital’s capacity to fix space to accumulate and forestall crisis. We continue this by considering the ‘socio-spatial fix’, allowing closer investigation of who makes the landscapes of capitalism, and how actor choices and actor inter- and intra-relationships forestall crises of accumulation. We show how crisis, time and actors are central to making and re-making socio-spatial fixes and in turn to understanding both the socio-spatial dialectic and the spatial fix. Empirically, we compare two remote but globally networked mining towns, Kiruna, Sweden and Newman, Australia. Mining towns are rewarding case-studies because capital’s relative immobility and the dominance of a single industry make strikingly clear how both production and social reproduction are remade. We enrich general theorisations in three ways, by explaining: first, how crisis-threatening events require renegotiation of socio-spatial arrangements; second, how time and timing are critical in remaking fixes; third, how actor agency and heterogeneity are central because the actors who make fixes change over time and are in complex relationships with each other.

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  • 3.
    Blix, Bodil H.
    et al.
    Department of health and care sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway; Faculty of education, arts and sports, Western Norway University of Applied Science, Norway.
    Emelyanova, Anastasia
    Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Olafsdottir, Steinunn A.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Rautio, Arja
    Arctic Health, Biomedicine and Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland; University of the Arctic, Finland.
    Age-inclusive communities and outdoor spaces in the Arctic: Omissions in national policies2024Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences. Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden; Umeå School of Business, Economics and Statistics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Center for Environmental and Resource Economics, CERE, Umeå, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Per
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Muricho, Deborah
    Department of Land Resource Management & Agricultural Technology (LARMAT), University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Mureithi, Stephen
    Department of Land Resource Management & Agricultural Technology (LARMAT), University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wredle, Ewa
    Department of Animal Nutrition and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Gert
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Adaptive pastoralists—Insights into local and regional patterns in livelihood adaptation choices among pastoralists in Kenya2023In: Pastoralism, E-ISSN 2041-7136, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pastoralist adaptation strategies have to address multiple, overlapping, and often inter-related processes of socio-ecological change. The present study addresses the need for inter-regional comparative studies that account for different geographic, climate, and socio-economic contexts in order to understand how pastoralists adapt to changes in livelihood conditions. The paper uses data from a unique survey study of pastoralist households in four neighbouring counties in dryland Kenya. Taking our point of departure from an empirically based classification of the livelihood strategies available to pastoralists in the Horn of Africa, the survey offers novel insights into adaptation and fodder management strategies of pastoralist individuals and households. The results show that the use of migration as a strategy is more dependent on the ability to migrate than climate conditions. This is the case in localities where a substantial part of the land is subdivided, the population density is high, and where opportunities for migration are subsequently restricted. Diversification of livelihoods as a strategy is largely defined by opportunity. Intensification through active fodder management is mainly common in areas where there has been a proliferation of managed enclosures. Climate change will test the adaptive capacity of pastoralists in the studied region, and diversification and intensification strategies of both herd composition and livelihoods can be seen as strategies for increased climate resilience.

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  • 5.
    Emelyanova, Anastasia
    et al.
    Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Blix, Bodil H.
    Department of health and care sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Faculty of education, arts and sports, Western Norway University of Applied Science, Bergen, Norway.
    Larsson, Agneta
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Olafsdottir, Steinunn A.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Rautio, Arja
    Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Age-inclusive Arctic outdoor spaces: a policy review in four Nordic countries2024In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 83, no 1, article id 2339561Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, policy strategies were adopted in response to population ageing in the Nordic countries. Governmental actions have to be evaluated in terms of their efficacy. The objective of this article is to identify and review the policies related to age-inclusive outdoor spaces in the Arctic regions of Nordic countries. Our analysis focuses on central government white papers that address the older adults in Finland, Norway, Sweden, and Iceland. A review of such policy documents provides insights into the predominant understandings of older adults and healthy ageing. Moreover, such analysis may identify “blind spots” in the national policies, especially regarding the sparsely researched northernmost and rural Arctic territories. Our results demonstrate how the older populations in the Nordic Arctic and their access to outdoor spaces are addressed in the policy documents. We found that with few exceptions, the older people of the rural Arctic is strikingly absent in the Nordic national governmental papers. Moreover, access to outdoor spaces is mentioned in general terms, and specific challenges of the rural Arctic context, such as the harsh climate, long winters and geographical distances are not addressed. The noticed omissions might be the result of “urban-rural”, “south-north”, “indoor-outdoor”, and “generalisation” biases.

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  • 6.
    Fjellborg, Daniel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Lindahl, Karin Beland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Department of Political Science, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden; Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
    What to do when the mining company comes to town? Mapping actions of anti-extraction movements in Sweden, 2009–20192022In: Resources policy, ISSN 0301-4207, E-ISSN 1873-7641, Vol. 75, article id 102514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the actions of anti-extraction movements has primarily comprised single-case studies in developing countries. Despite increasing mobilization and policy objectives to increase mineral extraction in the EU, we have little systematic knowledge of forms of resistance in a European setting. This paper exhaustively and comparatively maps anti-extraction movements in Sweden and investigates how movements' actions relate to their socio-political contexts. Sixteen place-specific movements are identified and studied using frame analysis and political process theory. The results suggest that anti-extraction movements occur across Sweden and that their socio-political contexts differ in access to indigenous rights institutions, project owner engagement, and support/opposition from host municipalities and national interest groups. The frame analysis indicates that movements share several goals, sometimes interpret similar contexts differently, and that differences in actions reflect differences in interpretations of contextual opportunities. Our results show that anti-extraction movements in Sweden involve diverse actors, including environmental interest groups, new networks mobilizing against extraction projects, indigenous Sami organizations, farmers' organizations, and landowners. Broad repertoires of actions, including civil disobedience, are used to influence the public, permitting processes, political actors at various scales, and project owners. Differences in socio-political contexts often align with movements’ interpretations of opportunities and relate with differences in action choices.

  • 7.
    Kramvig, Britt
    et al.
    Department of Tourism and Northern Studies, UiT The Arctic University of Norway.
    Avango, Dag
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    The multiple landscapes of Biedjovaggi: Ontological conflicts on indigenous land2021In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 57, article id e35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we engage with environmental conflicts on indigenous land through a focus on an attempt to gain social licence to reopen and operate the Biedjovaggi mine in Guovdageainnu/Kautokeino in Sapmi, Norway. We argue that mining prospects bring forth ontological conflicts concerning land use, as well as ways to know the landscape and the envisioned future that the land holds. It is a story of a conflict between two different ways of knowing. The paper explores the Sami landscape through different concepts, practices and stories. We then contrast this to the way the same landscape is understood and narrated by a mining company, through the programmes and documents produced according to the Norwegian law and standards. We follow Ingold’s argument that the Sami landscape practices are taskscapes, where places, times and tasks are interconnected. These were not acknowledged in the plans and documents of the mining company. We conclude by addressing the tendency of extractive industries to reduce different landscapes in ways that fit with modern understandings, which oppose culture to nature.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Emelyanova, Anastasia
    Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Olafsdottir, Steinunn A
    Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Rautio, Arja
    Thule Institute, University of Oulu and Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Chapman, David
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Healthy Ageing and Outdoor Environment in the Arctic - Methodological Considerations2024Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Older residents' ability to move safely and independently throughout the year is critical to maintaining quality of life and function and postponing disability. There are few studies of environmental determinants of outdoor mobility for older people in rural areas, and even fewer cover the Nordic Arctic areas and its winter season.

    Our project investigates how people aged 70 or older perceive their lived urban and rural mobility space and the impact of environmental conditions commonly found in Nordic Arctic settlements in wintertime. The methodology is an exploratory mixed-method design, where we use a tailored questionnaire followed by focus group interviews to collect more specific data. Three regions of Finland (Lapland, Kainuu, Northern Ostrobothnia), two regions of Sweden (Norrbotten, Vasterbotten), and the whole of Iceland are covered.

    In this presentation, we will share our experiences and development of the methodology for the data collection. The questions must be expressed and understood similarly by respondents across Sweden, Finland and Iceland, and also across diverse residence typologies, for example, urban or rural. Hence, the wordings, definitions, contexts, and typologies of places are currently discussed within the research group and will also be an essential issue addressed during focus group interviews later in the project. Expected outcomes, such as tailored questionnaires and new knowledge, can be used to create safer outdoor environments and public spaces for older people living in the Nordic Arctic.

  • 9.
    MacPhail, Fiona
    et al.
    University of Northern British Columbia, School of Economics, Prince George, B.C., Canada.
    Lindahl, Karin Beland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Bowles, Paul
    University of Northern British Columbia, Department of Global and International Studies, Prince George, B.C., Canada.
    Why do Mines Fail to Obtain a Social License to Operate?: Insights from the Proposed Kallak Iron Mine (Sweden) and the Prosperity/New Prosperity Gold–Copper Mine (Canada)2023In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opposition to mines endures even in countries with relatively strong environmental assessment processes and regulations. Why proposed mines fail to obtain a social license to operate is analyzed by developing a framework comprised of three concepts—process legitimacy, distributional outcomes, and values compatibility—drawing from the social license to operate, interactive governance, and environmental justice literatures. The framework is applied to understand opposition from local Indigenous people to two mine projects, one in Sweden and the other in British Columbia, Canada. Evidence from interviews with Sami legal experts and Reindeer Herding Community representatives and an advisor with the Tŝilhqot’in National Government, as well as from secondary sources is used to analyze the contestation. Despite the proposed mines being situated in different governance contexts, the reasons for the opposition are markedly similar - environmental assessment processes are illegitimate, distributional outcomes unfair, and values incompatible. The comparative empirical analysis leads to refining the framework as a scaffold with values compatibility as the foundational plank, rather than three independent planks contributing to a social license to operate. The analysis offers insights into company commitments to Indigenous engagement, enhancements to process legitimacy, and evolving and paradigmatic shifts in governance processes, as articulated by Indigenous peoples and international governance mechanisms such as the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

  • 10.
    Ntiyakunze Stanslaus, Matilda
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences. Ardhi University, Tanzania.
    Stage, Jesper
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Forest dependence in Tanzania: Analysis of the determinants of perceived forest dependence2022In: Trees, Forests and People, ISSN 2666-7193, Vol. 8, article id 100277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Great hopes have been placed on devolution policies as a means of attaining sustainable forest management in developing countries. However, heavy dependence on forests by many rural households has led to forest degradation and deforestation, which undermine the success of such policies. This study contributes to the existing literature by exploring factors affecting perceived forest dependence and by introducing private forest ownership, i.e., forests cultivated on private land, into the analysis. The analysis was based on household cross-sectional survey data collected in the subsample areas of Njombe and Shinyanga, Tanzania. Ordered logit models were run to estimate the factors associated with perceived forest dependence. Findings show that private forest owners are associated with higher forest income shares than the non-private forest owners. Region dummy variable suggest that households in Njombe where private forestry is more reported are associated with a higher probability of perceiving themselves as highly forest dependents than those in Shinyanga. Household socio-economic characteristics are also found to correlate with households’ perceptions of their dependence on forests. The findings, thus, point to more research on the link between perceived forest dependence and conservation of forest resources in order to establish consolidated approaches to sustainably conserve communal and state forests. Concurrently, further studies on households’ ownership of forests on private lands are recommended.

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  • 11.
    Näsman, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    Uppsala University, 753 10 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björling, Nils
    Chalmers University, 412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Madeleine
    Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Liliequist, Evelina
    Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Anna-Sofia
    Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Rataj, Marcin
    Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Rönnblom, Malin
    Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden.
    Scott, David
    Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden.
    Viklund, Roine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    A promised land? First summary of the research program2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document lays out the background for the research program “A promised land? Drivers, challenges and opportunities related to the (green) industrialization of Northern Sweden,” (nr. M22-0029) awarded by the Swedish Riksbankens Jubileumsfond’s in 2022. The document summarizes work in progress and may therefore be updated and republished in different versions according to the requirements of the program.  

    This interdisciplinary program aims to understand the economic, social, and political challenges and opportunities of the ongoing industrial transformation in northern Sweden. A key element of the program is to identify drivers, obstacles, and preconditions in a historical, present, and forward-looking processperspective.  

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  • 12.
    Poelzer, Gregory A
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Social Sciences.
    Corporate Engagement Strategies in Northern Mining: Boliden, Sweden and Cameco, Canada2023In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 838-849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of corporations in societal outcomes continues to grow. Mining companies now face the expectation of not only providing economic benefits to communities, but act as a facilitator for social wellbeing and environmental stewardship. In the mining sector, this has placed renewed attention to defining corporate social responsibility and, in turn, how social license to operate is understood. These developments are particularly pertinent when mining operations affect Indigenous communities – where land use is central to livelihood. This study looks at the community engagement strategies of two mining companies in northern countries, Cameco (Canada) and Boliden (Sweden). By comparing their approaches, this paper explores the development of their practices over time and assess to what extent their corporate policy has translated into everyday practice and outcomes. The findings of demonstrate that high levels of trust are established when corporate approaches are built around transparency and collaboration – resulting in agreements that include long-term partnerships around socio-economic and environmental management.

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  • 13.
    Rentz, Ralf
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education.
    Från insamling av data till användbar karta: Formativ undervisning för GIS-projektarbeten inom geografiundervisning på gymnasieskolan2020Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta utvecklingsarbete betraktar formativ undervisning för GIS-projektarbeten från insamlingav data till användbar karta inom geografiundervisning på gymnasieskolan. Studien utgår från ett sociokulturellt lärandeperspektiv där kommunikation mellan lärare och elever har en nyckelroll. Problem och frågor blir därmed utgångspunkt för lärandet och kan initiera formativ agerande av läraren. Under lektionsseriens gång har läraren försökt att hela tiden reflektera över vad den ser och vad som kan göras annorlunda i undervisningssyfte. Utifrån det har läraren bestämt sig för metoder och vägar för att sprida geografins kunskap till elever och samtidigt granska sitt agerande. En kategorisering av lärarens agerande visar att diskussioner med eleverna har en central roll inom formativ undervisning. Att diskutera med eleverna är det främsta undervisningssätt som används tillsammans med att ge instruktioner, motivera elever eller erbjuda eleverna material att arbeta vidare med. Motiv till att läraren väljer agera formativt kan uppstå i en samtalssituation med elever, i läsning av elevers skrivna material eller genom att iaktta elevernas ageranden respektive lyssnandet till deras egna diskussioner. Det visar sig att inom en lektionsserie om och med GIS ges stor möjlighet att elevers utvecklingsprocess gynnas när de gemensam utför praktiska uppgifter där de är tvungna att kommunicera och på olika sätt delar erfarenheter med varandra. Samtidigt ger det läraren chansen till att observera och reflektera med möjlighet att agera formativt. Att mäta själva effekten genom formativt agerande har förblivit svårbedömt men utifrån de gjorda erfarenheterna uppmuntras till att använda sig och pröva formativ undervisning särskilt i ramar av projektarbeten.

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  • 14.
    Silva, Cristian
    et al.
    Queen’s University Belfast, School of Natural and Built Environment, David Keir Building, DKB 03.019, Stranmillis Rd., Belfast BT9 5AG, United Kingdom.
    Ma, Jing
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    A Sustainable Urban Sprawl?: The Environmental Values of Suburban Interstitial Spaces of Santiago de Chile2021In: DISP, ISSN 0251-3625, E-ISSN 2166-8604, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 50-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban sprawl in Latin America is described as one of the major problems of ‘the growth machine’. As a reaction, most planning policies are based on anti-sprawl narratives, while in practice, urban sprawl has been thoroughly consolidated by all tiers of government. In this paper – and using the capital city of Chile, Santiago, as a case study – we challenge these anti-sprawl politics in light of the emerging environmental values and associated meanings of the interstitial spaces resulting from land fragmentation in contexts of urban sprawl. Looking at the interstitial spaces that lie between developments becomes relevant in understanding urban sprawl, considering that significant attention has been paid to the impact of the built-up space that defines the urban character of cities and their governance arrangements. We propose that looking at Santiago’s urban sprawl from the interstitial spaces may contribute to the creation of more sustainable sprawling landscapes and inspire modernisations beyond anti-sprawl policies. Finally, it is suggested that a more sustainable urban development of city regions might include the environmental values of suburban interstices and consider them as assets for the creation of more comprehensive planning and policy responses to urban sprawl.

  • 15.
    Sjöholm, Jennie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Reshaping remnants of the recent past in transforming Swedish mining towns2021In: Transcending the Nostalgic: Landscapes of Postindustrial Europe beyond Representation / [ed] George S. Jaramillo & Juliane Tomann, Berghahn Books , 2021, 1, p. 112-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Even as the global economy of the twenty-first century continues its dramatic and unpredictable transformations, the landscapes it leaves in its wake bear the indelible marks of their industrial past. Whether in the form of abandoned physical structures, displaced populations, or ecological impacts, they persist in memory and lived experience across the developed world. This collection explores the affective and “more-than-representational” dimensions of post-industrial landscapes, including narratives, practices, social formations, and other phenomena. Focusing on case studies from across Europe, it examines both the objective and the subjective aspects of societies that, increasingly, produce fewer things and employ fewer workers.

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