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  • 1.
    Anderson, Agnes
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Skogen berör alla: Maktrelationer inom skogsbruket i Jokkmokks kommun 1980-19902017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Forestry has a long history in Sweden and came during the 20th century to end up in a series of conflicts with the interest groups advocating the immaterial values of the forest. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to describe the power relationships that were prevalent during the 1980s forestry in the municipality of Jokkmokk. This study primarily focuses on highlighting the voices during the 1980s forestry in the municipality of Jokkmokk who were silenced by groups that prioritize the material values of the forest. How the colonized have acted and reacted will also be discussed. This study shows that the municipality of Jokkmokk became overly exploited in the 1980s which came to create the power relationships between forest interest groups. Felling affected both reindeer herding and the local population and it is possible to speak of the 1980s as a continued post-colonial era where a colonial discourse is prevalent. The survey also shows that it was possible to resist but that the votes in favor of the forest's immaterial values were easily neglected.

  • 2.
    Dagnäs, Klara
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Tillgänglighetens påverkan på kulturvärden i statliga byggnadsminnen2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is a great determination towards an increased accessibility in today’s society.  This creates some problems, when the building in question is a historic building of cultural significance, due to legislations and protective regulations. This thesis is executed as research for The National Property Board Sweden (SFV), who deals with these kinds of difficulties daily.

    The objective of this theses was to explore the influence of accessibility adaptation on cultural values in historic buildings from the 19th century, with a focus on doorways. The aim is also to identify possible faults and weaknesses that could cause a loss in cultural values.

    The study is based on a literature review and observations of eight doorways in the historical buildings Gamla Riksarkivet, Kungliga Operan, Linneanum and Uppsala Universitetshus. For each doorway actions and procedures have been identified and categorized based on the affected cultural values using two different evaluation models.

    The visual changes are, according to the result, the most frequent reason behind the affected cultural values that has been studied. The increase in social reforms and legislation about accessibility are the result of a changing society that has altered its preceptions of disabilities. This could be traced back as one of the major reasons that might be behind the loss of cultural values. Accessible environments are important, we should however consider that the cultural heritage is poorly accessible for a reason.

    It has been discovered that the studied archive files and documents have a lack of information, what actions and procedures the building had endured are vague. The amount of details explaining the procedures and justification of the actions are also limited, especially in the permit applications from SFV and its resolve from RAÄ.

    In order to facilitate the issue of how the legislation for accessibility and cultural values should ​​be interpreted, policy documents of how the laws should relate to each other are required.

  • 3.
    Danielsson, Denise
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Ja visst gör det ont när församlingen brister: En fallstudie av Luleå Baptistförsamling 1905-19152016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4.
    Ek, Emma
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Kvinnorna tar plats: En uppsats om kvinnorna i Luleå stadsfullmäktige 1910-1919 och deras bakgrund2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay studies the women that sat in Luleå Stadsfullmäktige between 1910 and 1919 and the bills, questions and the applications they sent in and worked with. The essay is a qualitative survey with a descriptive approach since it tries to describe and tell what these women worked with and what questions they were especially involved in. The survey is to demarcated to 1910 -1919 because 1910 was the first year that a woman could be elected to Stadsfullmäktuge and this opened new doors for what women could participate in within muncipality politics. The survey ends 1919 because the material was so extenstive and because women’s suffrage had occured. The survey found what questions the women worked with. For exampel sobriety, potato cultivation and women’s salary. 

  • 5.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Bergqvist, Olof2016In: Encyclopedia of the Barents Region: Vol. 1, A-M / [ed] editor-in-chef: Mats-Olov Olsson ; co-editors: Fredrick Backman ... [et al.] ; assistant and graphics editor: Lars Elenius, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 88-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Conceptions of ethnicity and nature conservation in reindeer herding areas in Sweden and Finland2016In: Indigenous Rights in Modern Landscapes: Nordic Conservation Regimes in Global Context / [ed] Lars Elenius, Christina Allard, Camilla Sandström, New York: Routledge , 2016, p. 25-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Ethnopolitical mobilisation in the North Calotte area2017In: The Barents and the Baltic Sea Region. Contacts, Influences and Social Change, The Historical Association of Northern Finland , 2017, Vol. 77, p. 83-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Tornedalians in northern Sweden  and  the  Kvens  in  northern  Norway  are  two large Finnish speaking national minorities. The Tornedalians was part of the continuous Finnish culture stretching from southern Finland up to the northernmost part of the Gulf of Bothnia. They were integrated in the Swedish kingdom from the 14th century but in 1809, at the time Sweden lost Finland to Russia, they were left on the Swedish side as a small and marginalised minority. In northern Norway a large immigration of Finnish speakers from Sweden and Finland took place in the 18th     and 19th century. They were, according to Norwegian tradition, called Kvens and regarded as immigrants who, as time went on, received Norwegian citizenship.

    The Tornedalians and Kvens share a common Finnish cultural heritage within   the transnational area of northernmost Scandinavia called the North Calotte.1 Both minorities were exposed to a harsh assimilation policy from the latter half of the 19th century within each nation state. During most of the 20th century they remained loyal to the majority culture of the state, but in the 1980s a strong political mobilisation and ethnic revitalisation took place, launching new political and cultural organisations. They now emphasized their Finnish cultural heritage and claimed aid from the state for the maintenance of their minority cultures.

    In the 1990s the political mobilisation was taken even further when part of the Tornedalians in Sweden, and the Kvens in Norway, claimed that they all belonged to a historically ancient Finnish speaking people called Kvens, who was mentioned in historical sources from the Viking Age. This new kind of transnational identity policy was deliberately directed against the Sámi people, who at that time received an official status as indigenous people in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Since the Sámi people claims land rights and political autonomy out of their history from immemorial   time, both history and myth has come to be in focus for the Kven movement in their transnational political mobilisation, in order to proof their legitimacy as an ancient indigenous people.

    The aim of the article is to investigate how the power relation between the Tornedalian minority and the Swedish state changed from the 1930s to the 1990s, and how the expression of ethnic and national identification changed as part of the

     

     

    1 The North Calotte region was created in the late 1950s, as a specific northern dimension of the Northern Countries [Norden]. It comprised the counties of Norway, Sweden and Finland that were tangent to the Arctic Circle.

     

     

     

    political mobilisation of the minority. The method for investigating the changed power relations is to analyse the way Tornedalian claims on the state changed and the way new types of political organisation contributed to this. The use of history in the public is an important part of this. Expressions of ethnic and national identification  in relation to political mobilisation will be investigated through  the  reading  of  some Tornedalian periodicals and journals during the period of investigation. Some comparison is done with the Kven movement in northern Norway.

  • 8.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Grape, Pehr Olof2016In: Encyclopedia of the Barents Region: Vol. 1, A-M / [ed] editor-in-chef: Mats-Olov Olsson ; co-editors: Fredrick Backman ... [et al.] ; assistant and graphics editor: Lars Elenius, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 279-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    History2016In: Encyclopedia of the Barents Region: Vol. 1, A-M / [ed] editor-in-chef: Mats-Olov Olsson ; co-editors: Fredrick Backman ... [et al.] ; assistant and graphics editor: Lars Elenius, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 295-303Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Indtroduction2016In: Indigenous Rights in Modern Landscapes: Nordic Conservation Regimes in Global Context / [ed] Lars Elenius, Christina Allard, Camilla Sandström, New York: Routledge , 2016, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Introduction2016In: Indigenous Rights in Modern Landscapes: Nordic Conservation Regimes in Global Context / [ed] Lars Elenius, Christina Allard, Camilla Sandström, New York: Routledge , 2016, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Læstadius, Lars Levi2016In: Encyclopedia of the Barents Region: Vol. 1, A-M / [ed] editor-in-chef: Mats-Olov Olsson ; co-editors: Fredrick Backman ... [et al.] ; assistant and graphics editor: Lars Elenius, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 407-408Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Meeting between peoples: The Multicultural World Heritage of Gammelstad2019 (ed. 500)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sámi presence in Gammelstad and the lower river valley is reconstructed through court records, household strategies examinations and matrimonial records. As recently as the mid-19th century, many in the population could speak Sámi, Finnish or Swedish. We can also trace the collective memory regarding Sámi settlements in villages such as Rutvik, Alvik and Måttsund. There are place names there such as Lappgärdan as a topographical reminder of Sámi who lived there. The book also sheds new light on the early Finnish-speaking population in the coastal area. From the history of the 20th th century there are accounts of how Finnish war children in all haste had to leave Finland that was in the throes of a war with the Soviet Union. The first war children arrived in 1942 and were boarded out to families. Some of them remained even after the war.

  • 14.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Minoritetsspråken i nationalistisk växelverkan: samiska och finska som kyrkospråk och medborgarspråk2016In: Gränsöverskridande kyrkohistoria: de språkliga minoriteterna på Nordkalotten / [ed] Daniel Lindmark, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2016, p. 13-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Multiculturalism, migration and minorities in Finland during the three centuries2017In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 137, no 4, p. 727-730Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Möten mellan olika folk: den mångkulturella kyrkstaden i Gammelstad2019 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Genom domstolsprotokoll, husförhörslängder och giftermålslängder för att rekonstrueras den samiska närvaron i Gammelstad och den nedre älvdalen. Ännu i mitten av 1800-talet talade många i befolkningen samiska, finska eller svenska. Vi får också följa det kollektiva minnet efter samiska bosättningar i byar som Rutvik, Alvik och Måttsund. Där finns platser som kallas Lappgärdan som minnen i landskapet efter samer som bott där. I boken sätts också den tidiga finskspråkiga befolkningen i kustområdet i ny belysning. Från 1900-talets historia beskrivs hur finska krigsbarn tumultartat fick lämna ett Finland i fullt krig med Sovjetunionen. De första krigsbarnen anlände 1942 och utplacerades i familjer. En del av dem blev också kvar efter kriget.

  • 17.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Nationella minoriteters symboliska nationsbyggande: Föreställningen om Kvänland och Sápmi som nya former av etnopolitik bland finskspråkiga och samiskspråkiga minoriteter2018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 138, no 3, p. 480-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sápmi and Kvänland as new forms of ethno-policy among Sámi and Finnish speaking minorities

    In the article the creation of two transnational ethnic homelands, Sápmi and Kvenland in northern Scandinavia, is explored from the 1970s to present day. They are created as symbolic nations with their own nation flags, memorial days and anthems. In this respect they resemble other “nations without states” round the world. The aim is to analyse theories on transnational nation building in northern Fennoscandinavia out of these two cases. The investigation demonstrates how the use of history and myths has been used in a competition between Sámi and Finnish speakers about the right to be regarded as an indigenous people. These ethnic groups of people are now politically organised on both national and transnational level, and the Sámi also on global level.

    With the global strengthening of indigenous rights, Sámi-speaking groups introduced, in the 1970s, Sápmi as a transnational homeland for the Sámi people in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. After the official recognition of Sámi as an indigenous people, and the launching of Sámi parliaments in the Nordic countries in the 1990s, Finnish speaking minorities organised cross nation-borders in order to also be recognised as an indigenous people. They have deliberately used the Norwegian ethnonym Kven for depicting the united people of Finnish speakers cross nation borders in Sweden, Norway and Finland. Kven is the name of Finnish speaking migrants in northern Norway from at least the 17th century, but it was also used by the Norwegian Vikings in the 9th century for depicting an ancient people or ethnic group of people round the Gulf of Bothnia area.

    The relation between the concepts of state, nation, ethnicity and nationalism have been investigated in theories of ”nations without states”. The article demonstrates how ethnicity and nation are problematic notions to use when nations are created cross state borders. Since the nation-state has been the political form of modernity it has forced the minorities to use the nation as a model for meeting ethno-political demands. Ethno-policy has, in an increasing way, been carried out in a global and new democratic context with enlarged minority rights. It has made ethnic forms of organizing change. Ethnicity has more and more become means for putting forward political demands in ethnic form, being embedded in mediated forms. The interplay between ethnic, national and transnational identifications therefore differ from the earlier national identity and run parallel to each other.

  • 18.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sapmi2016In: Encyclopedia of the Barents Region: Vol. 2, N-Y / [ed] editor-in-chef: Mats-Olov Olsson ; co-editors: Fredrick Backman ... [et al.] ; assistant and graphics editor: Lars Elenius, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 305-309Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Snell, William2016In: Encyclopedia of the Barents Region: Vol. 2, N-Y / [ed] editor-in-chef: Mats-Olov Olsson ; co-editors: Fredrick Backman ... [et al.] ; assistant and graphics editor: Lars Elenius, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 329-330Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Stiftsledningen och minoritetspolitiken2016In: De historiska relationerna mellan Svenska kyrkan och samerna: en vetenskaplig antologi Bd. 2 / [ed] Daniel Lindmark & Olle Sundström, Skellefteå: Artos & Norma bokförlag, 2016, p. 469-518Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Were the “Kainulaiset” in the Kalix River valley Finnish or Swedish-speakers?: A reinterpretation of ethnonyms in Finland and the Gulf of Bothnia area from the Viking Age and onwards2018In: Acta Borealia, ISSN 0800-3831, E-ISSN 1503-111X, no 2, p. 1-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Norwegian ethnonym Kven and the Finnish ethnonym Kainulainen occurred at latest in the first millennium AD. A tacit truth held today is that the ethnonyms represent the same ancient Finnish-speaking group, only named differently by Norwegians and Finns. The aim of the article is to find out whether the ethnonyms have been used to designate different groups of people. The Finnish-speakers in the nearby Tornedalen has called the lower part of the Kalix River in northernmost Sweden the Kainuu River and the upper part Kaalas River after the original Sámi name of the river. According to theories on ethnicity they called the lower part the Kainuu River [Fin. Kainuunväylä] because they wanted to mark out the Swedish speakers of different ethnicity, who they called Kainulaiset. The latter mainly settled the lower part of the river in the Middle Ages and Finnish-speakers the upper part. The article reveals that the Sámi variety Gainolâš was used by the Sámi for depicting dominant majority populations of different ethnicity, especially Scandinavians, but sometimes also Finns. It also argues that Finnish settlers in southern Finland and the northernmost Gulf of Bothnia used Kainulainen for depicting Swedish settlers when the two language groups first encountered.

  • 22.
    Elenius, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Allard, ChristinaLuleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.Sandström, CamillaDepartment of Political Science, Umeå University.
    Indigenous rights in modern landscapes: Nordic conservation regimes in global context2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines the diverse use of Indigenous customary rights in modern landscapes from a multidisciplinary perspective. Divided into two parts, the first deals explicitly with Sámi customary rights in relation to nature conservation in the Nordic countries and Russia from a legal and historical perspective. The authors investigate how longstanding Sámi customary territorial rights have been reassessed in the context of new kinds of legislation regarding Indigenous people. They also look at the ideas behind the historical models of nature conservation. The second part deals with the ideas and implementation of new kinds of postcolonial models of nature conservation. The case of the Sámi is compared with other Indigenous people internationally with cases from Australia, New Zealand, Canada and India. The work investigates how the governance of protected areas has been influenced by the principles of equality and positive discrimination, and how it has affected the possibilities of establishing adaptive co-management arrangements for specific areas. How the legal situation of Indigenous peoples has been recognised in an international context is also investigated. The volume provides a multidisciplinary analysis of how the customary livelihood of Indigenous people has adapted to modern industrialised landscapes and also how postcolonial approaches have contributed to global changes of Indigenous rights and nature conservation models

  • 23.
    Elenius, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Allard, ChristinaLuleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.Sandström, CamillaDepartment of political science, Umeå Universitet.
    Indigenous Rights in Moders Landscapes: Nordic Conservation Regimes in Global Context2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines the diverse use of Indigenous customary rights in modern landscapes from a multidisciplinary perspective. Divided into two parts, the first deals explicitly with Sámi customary rights in relation to nature conservation in the Nordic countries and Russia from a legal and historical perspective. The authors investigate how longstanding Sámi customary territorial rights have been reassessed in the context of new kinds of legislation regarding Indigenous people. They also look at the ideas behind the historical models of nature conservation. The second part deals with the ideas and implementation of new kinds of postcolonial models of nature conservation. The case of the Sámi is compared with other Indigenous people internationally with cases from Australia, New Zealand, Canada and India. The work investigates how the governance of protected areas has been influenced by the principles of equality and positive discrimination, and how it has affected the possibilities of establishing adaptive co-management arrangements for specific areas. How the legal situation of Indigenous peoples has been recognised in an international context is also investigated. The volume provides a multidisciplinary analysis of how the customary livelihood of Indigenous people has adapted to modern industrialised landscapes and also how postcolonial approaches have contributed to global changes of Indigenous rights and nature conservation models.

  • 24.
    Elenius, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Vakhtin, Nikolai B.
    Department of Anthropology, European University, S:t Petersburg.
    Minorities and minority-related issues2016In: Encyclopedia of the Barents Region: Vol. 1, A-M / [ed] editor-in-chef: Mats-Olov Olsson ; co-editors: Fredrick Backman ... [et al.] ; assistant and graphics editor: Lars Elenius, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 495-507Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Elenius, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Vasilevskaya, Natalia V.
    Department of Natrual Science, Murmansk Arctic State University.
    Nature protection2016In: Encyclopedia of the Barents Region: Vol. 2, N-Y / [ed] editor-in-chef: Mats-Olov Olsson ; co-editors: Fredrick Backman ... [et al.] ; assistant and graphics editor: Lars Elenius, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 33-42Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Englund, Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Uppförandet av Pontusbadet: En studie av folkhemsbygget i Luleå2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of Pontusbadet as a welfare-institution in Luleå and the methods of this survey are a combination of hermeneutics and comparative analysis. In the late 1940s public bathing was a much-discussed topic both on the national and the local level because it was legislated as part of the municipal and social policies. Hence an architectural competition was arranged in Luleå to construct a public bathhouse in the early 1950s. Thereby the authorities main motives were to improve the hygiene of the city`s growing population but also a part of a more extensive project of improving the general swimming ability in the Swedish society. Architecturally the construction combined ideas of hygiene, leisure and pleasant public areas because it was a product of social engineering. Thus, Pontusbadet fulfilled both rational and symbolic motives.

  • 27.
    Forsberg Lundell, Fanny
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Viklund, Roine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    På jakt efter framtidens kompetenser: Om humanioras potential på arbetsmarknaden2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Grein, Judit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Bävergäll: En historisk studie av bävergäll inom svensk läkekonst2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Castoreum have been used as a drug for over 2500 years in both folk medicine and school medicine. It is based on the pungent smelling content of specific pouches of the beaver. In this study the medical use of castoreum is examined, with a focus on Sweden from the 1600s to the early 1900s. The essay describes in which ways castoreum was used as a treatment and in which forms. It tells from where you got the castoreum as well as how much you had to pay for it. This essay also presents castoreum throughout history and its wide application that includes a broad spectrum from toothache to hysteria. Castoreum was well into the 1900s an official drug at Swedish pharmacies, and it was such a sought-after drug that the high demand led to the extinction of the beaver in Sweden in the 1870s.

  • 29.
    Grein, Judit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Hästar vid Falu Gruva: 1540-18152017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Falu mine horses have historically been of great importance for the daily work at the mine. They were used above ground for the transportation of for example wood and ore, but also to power the many horse capstans that were used for hoisting and for pumping groundwater out of the mine. Between 1697 and 1815 horses began to work underground as well, with running horse capstans and with transportation. At first, these horses were lowered to the bottom of the mine every day, but later they came to live below ground. This study gives a broad picture of several aspects of the horse's life, focusing on the period from 1540 to 1815, when the horses were very important to the mine. Despite the horses' prominent role in the mine's history, they have never fully been portrayed in historiography. This study aims to do that.

  • 30.
    Grenman, Jane
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Bisamråtta - ohyra eller guldgruva?: En studie över utredning och argumentationer gällande införsel av levande bisamråtta i Sverige 1916-19422018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In 1916, a ban of import was issued on the muskrat in Sweden, in the context of increased furtrade and implantations of muskrat around Europe. A muskrat committee was appointed in1938 to investigate the issue of its prohibition, thereof this study. Through a qualitative anddiscursive method, the intrusion order, media dissertation and the inquiry based on thecommittee have been studied during the period 1916-1942. The study has shown a result of avaried argumentation in which three key main themes permeated by a fourth have beenemerged. The three themes are identified as license applications, foreign influences andeconomics. The fourth theme that permeates the entire study is the arguments concerning theintroduction of the foreign species, the muskrat. These are laid down in a broader context andidentified on the basis of three main arguments, question of import, damage and economics.Where a constant argument about the question of muskrat has been shown over time. Theconclusion becomes the visibility of the state's power over nature in relation to the state'sclaim to satisfy economic needs in Norrland.

  • 31.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    The Peregrine Profession.: Transnational Mobility of Nordic Engineers and Architects, 1880-1930.2019Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In The Peregrine Profession Per-Olof Grönberg offers an account of thepre-1930 transnational mobility of engineers and architects educated inthe Nordic countries 1880-1919. Outlining a system where learningmobility was more important than labour market mobility, the authorshows that more than every second graduate went abroad.Transnational mobility was stronger from Finland and Norway thanfrom Denmark and Sweden, partly because of slower industrialisationand deficiencies in the domestic technical education. This mobilityincluded all parts of the world but concentrated on the leadingindustrial countries in German speaking Europe and North America.Significant majorities returned and became agents of technologytransfer and technical change. Thereby, these mobile graduates alsobecame important for Nordic industrialisation.

  • 32.
    Gustafsson, Camilla
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Nature during the Crusades: Physical and psychological affects from the environment in crusader narratives.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, I have investigated what some of the crusaders thought of and how they were affected by the nature they encountered during the crusades. This have been done based on written sources from the crusades using the concept of Environmental imagination in medieval texts. The texts in this study have been chosen depending on their availability and their translation. The crusaders found themselves in a new nature that they were not prepared for and in which the enemy could hide in. The nature could also work as a moral boost for the crusaders confirming that God was on their side or work as a death-trap when they were led astray. It is clear that the crusaders experienced both physical and psychological effects from the nature that they encountered during the crusades. 

  • 33.
    Hasselquist, Eliza Maher
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Nilsson, Christer
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Department of Wildlife, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Lind, Lovisa
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Polvi, Lina E.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Time for recovery of riparian plants in restored northern Swedish streams: A chronosequence study2015In: Ecological Applications, ISSN 1051-0761, E-ISSN 1939-5582, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 1373-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A lack of ecological responses in stream restoration projects has been prevalent throughout recent literature with many studies reporting insufficient time for recovery. We assessed the relative importance of time, site variables, and landscape setting for understanding how plant species richness and understory productivity recover over time in riparian zones of northern Swedish streams. We used a space-for-time substitution consisting of 13 stream reaches restored 5-25 years ago, as well as five unrestored channelized reference reaches. We inventoried the riparian zone for all vascular plant species along 60-m study reaches and quantified cover and biomass in plots. We found that while species richness increased with time, understory biomass decreased. Forbs made up the majority of the species added, while the biomass of graminoids decreased the most over time, suggesting that the reduced dominance of graminoids favored less productive forbs. Species richness and density patterns could be attributed to dispersal limitation, with anemochorous species being more associated with time after restoration than hydrochorous, zoochorous, or vegetatively reproducing species. Using multiple linear regression, we found that time along with riparian slope and riparian buffer width (e.g., distance to logging activities) explained the most variability in species richness, but that variability in total understory biomass was explained primarily by time. The plant community composition of restored reaches differed from that of channelized references, but the difference did not increase over time. Rather, different time categories had different successional trajectories that seemed to converge on a unique climax community for that time period. Given our results, timelines for achieving species richness objectives should be extended to 25 years or longer if recovery is defined as a saturation of the accumulation of species over time. Other recommendations include making riparian slopes as gentle as possible given the landscape context and expanding riparian buffer width for restoration to have as much impact as possible.

  • 34.
    Hjulman, Tore Andersson
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Ett med naturen: En studie av hur naturen omförhandlades i mellankrigstidens konflikter mellan naturskydd och samiska rättigheter2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tore Andersson Hjulman: One with Nature: An Inquiry into the Renegotiation of Nature in the Conflicts between Nature Preservation and Sámi Rights during the Interwar Period.[Ett med naturen: En studie av hur naturen omförhandlades i mellankrigstidens konflikter mellan naturskydd och samiska rättigheter.] PhD dissertation in Swedish, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden 2017.

    In 1909 the Swedish national parks law was adopted with the assumption that theSámi people living in the areas to be preserved were, in principle, one with nature. Therefore the perception of their land as pristine was consolidated and they could be excepted from park regulations. About thirty years later the national park administration stated that the aim to keep the national park nature untouched would fail without a restriction of Sámi rights within the parks. The aim of this thesis is to investigate how the distinction of nature from culture was renegotiated during the conflicts that preceded and followed this new stance. Tracing the impulses that fostered the reactions of the state administration back to their original contexts, complex interactions of differing interests are revealed. These contexts are examined in three case studies. The first case centers on nomad school superintendent Erik Bergström and his warning of the effects on the national parks from reindeer herders activities. The intersection of nature preservation and Sámi politics sheds light on their common outset in the use of the nature-culture dichotomy in approaching the Sámi. This contributes to explain the resistance by which the interest of change was met by those invested in the prevailing state policy towards the Sámi.The second case concerns a conflict of Sámi land use in the Abisko national park by the early 1930s. Several factors that possibly induced state officials to react on Sámi fishing and hunting in the national park are illuminated. These include different understanding of nature preservation, the moral ecology among the Sámi and antagonism between Sámi reindeer herders and inhabitants in the railway towns.The third case involves concerns raised in the process of establishing a new national park in the Muttos/Muddus area. A shift in focus from mountainous to forest landscapes among nature preservationists resulted in the inclusion of new stakeholders and fields of knowledge about land use and its effects. This seems to have spurred problematizing of both the ideal of pristine nature and of Sámi land use. A conflict was triggered by the in-migration of two reindeer herding families.In conclusion, it will be argued that it was a series of quite contextually different conflicts that interacted to undermine the institutionalized demarcation of nature. This simultaneously challenged Sámi rights in the national parks and took place in ideological opposition to the foundation of segregationist Sámi policy.

  • 35.
    Hjulman, Tore Andersson
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Rights of the naturised2016In: Indigenous Rights in Modern Landscapes: Nordic Conservation Regimes in Global Context / [ed] Lars Elenius, Christina Allard, Camilla Sandström, New York: Routledge , 2016, p. 42-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36. Jakobsson, Joakim
    Extrem antikommunism eller terroristangrepp: En undersökning av attentatet mot Norrskensflamman 19402016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study examines the usage of the term terrorism applied to the assault on the communistic daily paper, Norrskensflamman in the 40s. In short, the assault on Norrskensflamman, has been covered in various papers and stories. However amongst authors there seemingly has been a disagreement on whether the assault should be labeled a case of extremism or terrorism. Using a definition of terrorism, verbalized by expert in terrorism and counterterrorism, Bruce Hoffman and political scientist, Herfried Münkler, the study has been able to display that the assault in fact is not to be confused with nor labeled terrorism. Terrorism is however a widely debated therm. There is no unanimous definition, thus is the gray aria as apparent as ever.

  • 37.
    Johansson, Frida
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Kommunister i norr: En studie om kommunismen i Pajala kommun före och efter andra världskriget2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 38.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Conservation implications of parasite co-reintroduction2015In: Conservation Biology, ISSN 0888-8892, E-ISSN 1523-1739, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 602-604Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Endling, the Power of the Last in an Extinction-Prone World2017In: Environmental Philosophy, ISSN 1718-0198, E-ISSN 2153-8905, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 119-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In April 1996, two men working at a convalescent center wrote a letter to the journal Nature proposing that a new word be adopted to designate a person who is the last in the lineage: endling. This had come up because of patients who were dying and thought of themselves as the last of their family line. The word was not picked up in medical circles. But, in 2001, when the National Museum of Australia (NMA) opened its doors, it featured a gallery called Tangled Destinies and endling reappeared. On the wall facing a case with a thylacine specimen was written: Endling (n.) The last surviving individual of a species of animal or plant. Since that appearance, the word endling has slowly seeped into popular culture, appearing in symphonic music, performance art, science fiction stories, comics, and other art works. This paper examines the cultural power of the concept of endling as the last of a species and the history of its mobilization in a world facing extinction around every corner.

  • 40.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry, Umeå University.
    Rethinking rewilding2015In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 65, p. 482-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term 'rewilding' sounds as if it should have a straightforward meaning 'to make wild again'. But in truth the term has a complex history and a host of meanings have been ascribed to it. Rewilding as a specific scientific term has its beginnings as a reference to the Wildlands Project, which was founded in 1991 and aimed to create North American core wilderness areas without human activity that would be connected by corridors. Words, however, do not stand still-they change over time and take on new meanings, while sometimes simultaneously retaining the older sense. Employing Foucault's idea of historical genealogy, this article examines how the term rewilding was historically adopted and modified in ecological scientific discourse over the last two decades. This investigation probes what and, by extension, when and where, rewilding refers to as it has moved into various geographies across the globe. It then examines how the term has moved outside of science and been adopted by environmental activists as a plastic word. Taken as a whole, rewilding discourse seeks to erase human history and involvement with the land and flora and fauna. Such an attempted split between nature and culture may prove unproductive and even harmful. A more inclusive rewilding is a preferable strategy.

  • 41.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    University of Stavanger.
    Aesthetics of energy landscapes2018In: Environment, Space, Place, ISSN 2066-5377, E-ISSN 2068-9616, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Larsson, Fredrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Upphörandet av unionen: En jämförelse av norrbottniska tidningars skildring angående upphörandet av Svensk-norska unionen 19052017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 43.
    Lestander, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Hundra stenar faller: Gruv12: ans egna ord om arbete i världens största underjordsgruva2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mine12 is a union organisation that has been active in LKAB for 100 years, their struggle for better terms and working conditions is a process that is equelly long. In their struggle there have been all kinds of conflicts and cooperations, their story gives us an insight into their world and reality. This qualitative case study will look upon the history, the present and the individuals power to create the future. To succeed with this task the study will investigate how the Mine12 workers worked with work environment during the period 2002-2007. This essay will shed light on the work that was done during the period, but it has also shown how the individuals worked and effected their surroundings and future.

  • 44.
    Lidström, Emelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Facket och kommunaliseringen: En fallstudie kring debatten inom Statens Sjukhuspersonalsförbund rörande kommunaliseringen av mentalvården 19672018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The study is based on a qualitative text analysis of source material. The purpose of this paper has been to investigate how a local trade union department discusses the change of mental health care from state to municipal headquarters and with the interchange of connection to a larger union. The study shows that the union activities “Statens Sjukshuspersonals Förbund” did not have a positive impression that the county council would take over mental health care, nor did it have a positive picture of the transition to the Swedish Municipal Workers' Union. Something that is based on worrying about impaired profession. The conclusion of this survey is that communalization will end “Statens Sjukhuspersonals Förbund” Association, but by that means, it does not automatically mean that it is getting worse for those employed by the county council, but it must retain the same working conditions as in state employment.

  • 45.
    Lindahl, Karin Beland
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Department of Political Science, Umeå University.
    Wiklund, Roine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Competing pathways to sustainability?: Exploring conflicts over mine establishments in the Swedish mountain region2018In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 218, p. 402-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural resource (NR) exploitation often gives rise to conflict. While most actors intend to manage collectively used places and their NRs sustainably, they may disagree about what this entails. This article accordingly explores the origin of NR conflicts by analysing them in terms of competing pathways to sustainability. By comparing conflicts over mine establishments in three places in northern Sweden, we specifically explore the role of place-based perceptions and experiences.

    The results indicate that the investigated conflicts go far beyond the question of metals and mines. The differences between pathways supporting mine establishment and those opposing it refer to fundamental ideas about human–nature relationships and sustainable development (SD). The study suggests that place-related parameters affect local interpretations of SD and mobilisation in ways that explain why resistance and conflict exist in some places but not others. A broader understanding of a particular conflict and its specific place-based trajectory may help uncover complex underlying reasons. However, our comparative analysis also demonstrates that mining conflicts in different places share certain characteristics. Consequently, a site-specific focus ought to be combined with attempts to compare, or map, conflicts at a larger scale to improve our understanding of when and how conflicts evolve. By addressing the underlying causes and origins of contestation, this study generates knowledge needed to address NR management conflicts effectively and legitimately.

  • 46.
    Lindahl, Karin Beland
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Wiklund, Roine
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Matti, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Fjellborg, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Fjällnära Gruvdrift?: Konflikter om vägar till hållbarhet2016Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Lindgren, Axel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Svenska turistföreningen lulekretsen: Kampen för överlevnad2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 48.
    Lundström Thunderlin, Lisen
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Föreningen för Kvinnors Politiska Rösträtt i Luleå: En granskning av föreningens ställningstagande och tilvägagångsätt mellan 1907-19192016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 49.
    Malin, Johansson
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Bäverns återkomst till Norrbotten: Återintroduceringen av bäver 1960-19762016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    By 1871 the beaver was extinct in Sweden. The beaver was first reintroduced in the county of Jämtland in 1922 and during the 1960s it was also reintroduced in the county of Norrbotten. This is a relatively unexplored field and the intention is to chart the reintroduction of beavers in Norrbotten between 1960-1976. This essay will not study the reintroductions in general. It will only study Norrbotten during the period mentioned above. The results as such is not generalizable because the first reintroduction in Norrbotten was considerably later than in the other counties, which means that the agents and processes involved may have been different in other parts of the country. However, this survey shows the underlying motivations and constraints that existed and this might be applicable on other reintroductions. In the materials of the beaver inventories only information regarding Norrbotten has been used, even though the inventories contains a chart of the beavers in all of Sweden. It is possible to investigate if these patterns might be generally applicable

  • 50.
    Nilsson, Fay Lundh
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Grönberg, Per-Olof
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    ”Inget för de lärde?” Diskussionerna om lokaliseringen av de tekniska elementarskolorna i Sverige i mitten av 1800-talet2019In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 139, no 2, p. 251-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By the middle of the 19th century, Swedish industrialization began to accelerate. At the same time there was, in many countries, a strong belief in the potential of technology. As with the growing interest in a Swedish railway network – with the objective of promoting economic development throughout of the country – interest in developing a technical education system can be seen as part of this optimism. The director of the Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Lars Johan Wallmark, was, however, worried about the lack of middlelevel technical education. In 1850, he therefore suggested the establishment of technical secondary schools, modelled after the German Gewerbeschulen. These schools would both provide local and regional crafts and industries with technically skilled labour and prepare such students for higher technical studies.

    Wallmark’s proposal led to the establishment of technical secondary schools in four cities during the 1850s: Malmö, Norrköping, Borås and Örebro. However, only the first two schools corresponded directly to Wallmark’s original proposal. In this study, we make use of Walter Christaller’s central place theory to investigate why the schools came to be established in these four cities. We ask the following questions: How did the decision-makers argue about population base and catchment area? What characterized the cities where technical secondary schools were established compared to cities that expressed interest but were not chosen as sites for schools? And who were the main stakeholders and agents in this selection process? Our study shows that Wallmark’s idea was to establish schools nation-wide rather than to apply a principle for locational selection. In reality, however, one of the most important factors behind the establishment of schools appears to have been an industrial principle. Based on this, cities that already had significant industrial activities, or functioned as the central point for an industrialized hinterland, were favoured. In contrast, arguments such as good access to certified teachers – found mainly in university and cathedral cities – seem to have been less significant. Another important factor was the placement of the schools in relation to potential students. A third factor was strong local industrialists and other prominent persons who were interested in technical progress and who also had well developed connections with representatives in Parliament.

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