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  • 1.
    Bell, David
    et al.
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå.
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Department of Wildlife, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Christer
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Landscape Ecology Group, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Johansson, Therese
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Studies.
    Forest restoration to attract a putative umbrella species, the white-backed woodpecker, benefited saproxylic beetles2015In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 6, no 12, article id 278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Umbrella species are often spatially demanding and have limited ability to adapt to environmental changes induced by human land-use. This makes them vulnerable to human encroachment. In Sweden, broadleaved trees are disadvantaged by forestry, and commercially managed forests are often deprived of dead wood. This has led to a situation where previously widespread top predators in saproxylic food webs, such as the white-backed woodpecker (Dendrocopos leucotos), have become species of conservation concern. The white-backed woodpecker is generally considered an umbrella species, and it has been linked to forests with large volumes of dead wood from broadleaved trees. In recent years, forest stands have been restored for the white-backed woodpecker, but post-treatment evaluations have rarely included other species that also occur in broad-leaved forests (co-occurring species). Many co-occurring species are saproxylic beetles. In this study, we collected saproxylic beetles and environmental data in restored and commercially managed forests to evaluate if habitat restoration for the white-backed woodpecker also benefited other species with similar habitat associations. We found that volumes of coarse woody debris were higher in restored than in commercially managed forests, and that a majority of man-made snags and downed logs were created from birch trees (Betula spp.). Most spruce trees (Picea abies) were extracted during forest restoration, and this opened up the forest canopy, and created stands dominated by broadleaved trees.Many saproxylic beetles were more common in restored forests, and there were significant differences in species composition between treatments. These differences were largely explained by species traits. Effects of sunexposure were particularly important, but many beneficiary species were also linked to dead wood from broadleaved trees. Red-listed saproxylic beetles showed a similar pattern with more species and individuals in restored sites. The white-backed woodpecker is still critically endangered in Sweden, but important prey species are already responding to forest restoration at the stand level. We recognize that landscape-level improvements will be required to bring the white-backed woodpecker back, but also that the umbrella species concept can provide a useful framework for successful forest restoration as many co-occurring saproxylic beetle species seemingly benefitted from restoration for the white-backed woodpecker

  • 2.
    Bergmark, Paulina
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Jørgensen, Dolly
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University.
    Lophelia pertusa conservation in the North Sea using obsolete offshore structures as artificial reefs2014In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 516, p. 275-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep-water coral reefs are classified as vulnerable marine ecosystems, with trawling identified as the primary cause of reef destruction. Lophelia pertusa is the main reef-building species in deep-water coral reefs. In addition to occurring on natural hard substrates, the species has been previously observed on standing offshore oil and gas structures in the North Sea. In this study, we review the available published information about Lophelia growth on standing offshore oil and gas industry structures in the North Sea. We discuss the potential uses of obsolete offshore structures repurposed as artificial reefs for targeted Lophelia habitat. Our survey of previous studies indicates that artificial reefs created from obsolete structures have a strong potential to form Lophelia reef communities similar to those found on natural substrates, although the absence of the polychaete worm Eunice norvegica poses some concerns about the completeness of the coral communities that develop on artificial reef structures

  • 3.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristijn
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Business and Green Knowledge Production in Sweden 1960s-1980s2017Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Department of Economic History, Umeå university, Umeå universitet, Ekonomisk historia, Umeå universitet.
    Sabo, Josefin
    Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Energiomställning och teknisk omvandling i svensk massa- och pappersindustri 1970-19902014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research report examines the driving forces and strategies in the Swedish pulp and paper industry to phase-out of oil and accomplishing energy savings in the 1970s - and '80s. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of development and contribute to a further understanding of the knowledge building that took shape in the Swedish pulp and paper industry on the energy area in the awake of the oil crises. During the investigated period, the use of fossil fuels dropped with more than 70 per cent, and this was mainly achieved by substituting oil by internal biofuels. This transition started as response to the first oil crisis in 1973, but was further reinforced by the energy policy, which expanded from the mid 1970s and onwards. The replacement of oil was achieved trough short-term measures to improve the energy efficiency and to increase the use of biofuels, while the use of external electricity played a minor role. It was soon recognized that also long-term investments in R&D was needed. Collaborations between companies through trade associations and committees came to be a characteristic strategy employed by the industry to advance knowledge and new technology on the energy area. This report demonstrates the central role that the changing prices of oil had on the pulp and paper industry to explore the possibilities of a more efficient use of internal biofuels, which previously not had been utilised. In this sense, the oil crisis forced the industry sector into a more sustainable path. It also demonstrates the central role that the government played, and can play, to support and enhance the development of new technological development paths. As for the oil crises, a big part of the energy policy objectives i.e. to phase out oil from the Swedish energy system, coincided with the industry’s needs to lower the costs and risks from being dependent on oil.

  • 5.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Environmental adapation, technology development and competition: The case of Domsjö sulphite mill 1965-19902012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Green innovation systems in Swedish industry, 1960-19892011In: Business history review, ISSN 0007-6805, E-ISSN 2044-768X, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 677-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational networks had a strong influence on the diffusion of green knowledge within the Swedish pulp-and-paper industry from the mid-1960s to the 1980s. The environmental adaptations made by this industrial sector were not merely the result of a corporate initiative or of the response by firms or industries to environmental regulation. An examination of the innovation-system approach that was used to further the industry’s environmental goals reveals that the knowledge and technology development underpinning the project depended on a network of diverse actors. Within this network, the semi-governmental Institute for Water and Air Protection, working with a consulting company, was a critical generator and intermediary of knowledge. Thus, the success of the project was largely due to the Institute’s balanced relations with government and industry.

  • 7.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Department of Economic History, Umeå university, Umeå universitet, Ekonomisk historia, Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Industry Strategies for Energy Transition in the Wake of the Oil Crisis2014In: Business and Economic History On-Line, ISSN 0894-6825, E-ISSN 1941-7349, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores industry strategies to accomplish energy transition in the wake of the Oil Crisis in 1973 with the Swedish pulp and paper sector in the 1970s and the 1980s as case study. Over this period the use of fossil fuels was reduced by 70 percent within the sector. The lion’s share of this reduction was achieved by the substitution of oil by biofuels. Besides cutting the costs of energy this substitution also resulted in significant environmental improvements. Substituting oil by biofuels proved to be the overall most reasonable way to decrease the use of oil, even though alternatives such as coal were considered. Initially, oil reductions and energy conservation were accomplished by relatively small measures, but there was a great need for long-term R&D to push the technology development further. Inter-firm and state-firm collaborations therefore became strategically important. The strategies for substitution further interacted strongly with institutional changes in the energy policy field, the on-going greening of the industry as well as an urgent need to enhance international competitiveness. Our study concludes that the oil crises enforced a more sustainable production in a dynamic way, where government strategies to support and push technology development further played a central role.

  • 8.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Department of Economic History, Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Shared problems, shared costs and common solutions: Cooperation for clean technology development in the Swedish pulp- and paper industry 1900-19902010In: 8th European Social Science History Conference 13 April - 16 April 2010: ESSHC 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development and diffusion of "Clean Technologies" (CT) are generally acknowledged as particularly important to stabilise climate change and promoting industrial growth that are more sustainable. This paper deals with the development and diffusion of CT within Swedish forest industry during a period when pioneering steps were taken towards cleaner production processes. We will focus on the 1960s and 70s and address the role of business cooperation and state-industry cooperation in targeting pollution problems which for the most part were common for all plants in the pulp and paper sector. The role of cooperation and joint financed research institutes will be especially discussed. The Swedish forest industry embarked on pollution abatement long before this became a general concern. Already in 1954 the Water laboratory of the Forest Industry was set up to develop methods for reduction of pollution. During the sixties, initial environmental care was taken in close cooperation with the government. In 1966 the water laboratory was reorganised and enlarged to become the "Institute of Water and Air Protection (IVL)". In this new form, IVL was financed jointly by the Swedish government and the industry. When a more rigid anti pollution legislation was taken in 1969, the forest industry responded to the challenge by setting up numerous ambitious collective pollution abatement projects. Those R&D project were coordinated by the board of the Forest Industry Research Foundation for Air and Water Protection (SSVL), to organise development projects. In this paper, we focus on the novel activities of IVL and SSVL and explore its achievements on CT development and diffusion in Swedish pulp and paper industries, which became pioneering the development of important CT during the 1970s.

  • 9.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Strategies for Energy Transition: The Swedish Pulp and Paper Industry 1973-1990.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sustainable Energy Transition: The case of the Swedish Pulp and Paper Industry 1973-19902015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sustainable Energy Transition:: The case of the Swedish Pulp and Paper Industry 1973-19902016In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, E-ISSN 1570-6478, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 1179-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By employing historical case study methodology, this paper examines the transition towards renewable energy and increased energy efficiency in the Swedish pulp and paper industry (PPI) during the 1970s and 1980s. Between 1973 and 1990, CO2 emissions were cut by 80 % in this sector, and this was mainly achieved by substituting away from oil to biofuels in the form of by-products from the pulp manufacturing process. The CO2 reduction was also a result of energy efficiency improvements and increased internal production of electricity through back-pressure turbine power generation. Sweden was highly dependent on oil at the advent of the first Oil Crisis in 1973, and the increased oil prices put pressure on the Swedish government and the energy-intensive PPI to reduce this oil dependency. Of central importance for the energy transition was the highly collaborative strategy of the PPI, both internally among pulp mills as well as between the sector as a whole and the corporatist Swedish state administration. The Swedish government chose a proactive strategy by emphasizing knowledge management and collaboration with the industry along with the substitution of internal biofuels for oil. The transition was also characterized by a strong focus on unutilized potentials in the PPI; a previous waste problem now could be transformed into energy savings and improved energy efficiency. Energy taxes and fees also played an important role in Swedish energy policy during the 1970s and the 1980s. All in all, the study illustrates the central role of governments and their ability to push industrial sectors into new technological pathways through a wide palette of mutually reinforcing policy instruments. The results further point at the importance of a more holistic understanding of the interplay between different policies and their impacts in the longer run.

  • 12.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Svenska skogsindustrins samarbete i miljöfrågan: en framgångssaga?2012In: Nordisk Pappershistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1101-2056, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 3-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    The making of a green innovation system: the Swedish Institute for Water and Air Protection and the Swedish Pulp and Paper Industry in the mid-1960s to the 1980s2011In: Business History Conference 2011 Annual Meeting, St. Louis, Missouri, 31 March–2 April 2011: Abstracts and Papers, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we address the issue of organizational networks and the diffusion of green knowledge within the Swedish pulp and paper industry (P&P) from the mid-1960s to the 1980s. During this period, the Swedish P&P underwent a period of rapid environmental improvements. Our case demonstrates that the environmental adaptation of this line of business cannot be understood from merely a corporate focus—that is, as something accomplished by single firms or industries simply as a response to environmental regulation. By employing an innovation system approach, we find that the knowledge and technology development underpinning environmental adaptation within the Swedish P&P has involved a network of diverse actors. In this context, the semi-governmental Institute for Water and Air Protection (IVL) and its service company held important roles as intermediaries of knowledge within the network, not the least because of IVL's position "in between" government and industry. We suggest that one of the many important challenges for future research should be to compare how different national institutional settings have shaped the formation of "green" innovation systems. This would beneficially include national features of corporate stakeholder relations, as these influence firms' interplay with other firms as well as with other actors in the innovation system.

  • 14.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    The transition to cleaner technologies: the Swedish pulp and paper industry in a comparative perspective2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pulp and paper industry (PPI) has historically caused serious water pollution and offensive fumes and therefore peak the environmental agenda in virtually every nation with such production. Serious pressure on the pulp and paper industry to reduce emissions started in the late 1960s and the early 1970s, and was driven by new regulatory frameworks, public debates and changing market preferences, such as a new demand for chlorine free paper products on the European market in the 1990s. For any polluting industry technology is at the very core of the challenge of reducing the environmental impact, and this has been the case also for the PPI. Technological strategies and timing for investments have differed between countries and regions depending on the different institutional environments, organizational solutions and market demand characteristics. In the chapter we will focus on the Swedish PPI from the late 1960s until today, and discuss how the interplay between regulatory- and market/opinion pressure, technology development and environmental performance has evolved. We will also include the development of energy technology in our analysis, which before the 1990s was not distinctly connected to environmental concerns. The Swedish development will be partly contrasted to the parallel Finnish and North American development, mainly from an institutional and technology development perspective, and we will focus on explanations to the differing development paths. The chapter constitutes a synthesis of a longstanding research collaboration of Bergquist and Söderholm with focus on the environmental and energy technology strategies of the Swedish PPI. The comparative analyses of the Swedish and North American, respectively Finnish development is however previously partly unpublished. When it comes to the source materials used for these earlier publications concerning the Swedish case, we have primarily used board minutes (from individual companies as well as from industry organizations on the environment and energy), annual reports, trade journals, environmental licensing documents and interviews with representatives of the industry as well as government agencies. Concerning the comparative analyzes, including with North America and Finland, those have so far mainly been based on literature studies. The Swedish-Finnish comparison will however be supplemented by interviews.

  • 15.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Transition to chlorine free pulp!: Experiences from the Swedish pulp and paper industry in contrast to the U.S.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Department of Economic History, Umeå university, Ekonomisk historia, Umeå universitet, Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Transition to cleaner technologies: the Swedish pulp and paper industry in comparative perspective2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Transition to greener pulp: Regulation, industry responses and path dependency2015In: Business History, ISSN 0007-6791, E-ISSN 1743-7938, Vol. 57, no 6, p. 862-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the dioxin alarm broke at the same time in Sweden and the US in the mid-1980s, Swedish pulp and paper (P&P) firms led the way towards the new market for low-chlorine and chlorine-free P&P products. This study explores the transition in the Swedish P&P industry and contrasts the Swedish case to the US experience. We highlight the importance of already established technological paths to deal with pollution, paths which were strongly formed by the different national environmental policies since the 1970s. Thus while US P&P firms were technologically locked-in when the dioxin alarm broke, the strategy of Swedish P&P firms to proactively collaborate in environmental research and development (R&D) together with a national policy that favoured process integrated abatement technology, helped Swedish firms take technological leadership. This article particularly stresses the implications of technological path-dependency and different national regulatory styles in understanding the evolution of different modes of corporate environmental strategies.

  • 18.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Department of Economic History, Umeå university, Ekonomisk historia, Umeå universitet, Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Transition towards renewable energy: Co-ordination and technological strategies in the Swedish pulp and paper industry 1973-19902015Report (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Kinneryd, Hanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lindmark, Magnus
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Command-and-control revisited: environmental compliance and innovation in Swedish industry 1970-19902012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the issue of environmental policy instrument choice for achieving deep emissions reductions in the industrial sector. Specifically, it provides: (a) a theoretical review of the conditions under which performance standards can provide efficient incentives for environmental compliance and innovation ; and (b) an analysis of the design and the outcomes of the standards-based regulation of industrial pollutants in Sweden during the period 1970 - 1990. The empirical findings suggest that the Swedish regulatory approach comprised many key elements of an efficient policy-induced transition towards radically lower emissions in the metal smelting and pulp and paper industries. The regulation relied heavily on performance standards, thus granting flexibility to firms in terms of selecting the appropriate compliance measures, and the standards were implemented in combination with extended probation periods. R&D projects and the new knowledge that was advanced incrementally in interaction between the company, the environmental authorities and the research institutions provided a direct catalyst to the regulatory process. As such the Swedish regulatory approach provided scope for creative solutions, environmental innovation, and permitted the affected firms to coordinate pollution prevention measures with productive investments.

  • 20.
    Bergquist, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Department of Economic History, Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Kinneryd, Hanna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lindmark, Magnus
    Department of Economic History, Umeå university.
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Command-and-control revisited: environmental compliance and technological change in Swedish industry 1970-19902013In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 85, p. 6-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the issue of environmental policy instrument choice for achieving deep emission reductions in the industrial sector. Specifically, it provides: (a) a theoretical and empirical review of the conditions under which performance standards can provide efficient incentives for deep emission reductions and technology adoption; and (b) an analysis of the design and the outcomes of the standards-based regulation of industrial pollutants in Sweden during the period 1970–1990. Our empirical findings suggest that the Swedish regulatory approach comprised many key elements of an efficient policy-induced transition towards radically lower emissions in the metal smelting and pulp and paper industries. The regulation relied solely on performance standards, thus granting flexibility to firms in terms of selecting the appropriate compliance measures. These standards were implemented in combination with extended compliance periods. R&D projects and the new knowledge that was advanced incrementally in interaction between the company, the environmental authorities and research institutions provided a direct catalyst to the regulatory process. In these ways the Swedish regulatory approach provided scope for creative solutions, environmental innovation, and permitted the affected companies to coordinate pollution abatement measures with productive investments.

  • 21.
    Carlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lundgren, Nils-Gustav
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Sandström, Annica
    Universitetens roll i Forskarstation Östra Norrbotten: delrapport2003Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Cettner, Annicka
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Söderholm, Kristina
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    An adaptive stormwater culture?: historical perspectives on the status of stormwater within the Swedish urban water system2012In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 25-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the article is to analyze a number of historical explanations behind the slow process of change in stormwater management in Swedish urban planning and practice. We achieve this by studying three different periods of the long-term establishment of the Swedish urban water system over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, developments which were strongly linked to stormwater. The article recognizes the social construction of the system, i.e., how it grew out of human desires and how it grew extensively during the twentieth century due to an expansive growth of system-supporting public initiatives. These included funding opportunities as well as the establishment of different institutions and organizations. The analysis indicates that in their current efforts to transform urban stormwater management in a more sustainable direction, policymakers and implementers ought to be encouraged by an increased awareness of this social construction; what humans by their desires once built up, they should also be able to transform. Still, an important implication is also the need for such transforming efforts to determinately break away, both physically and mentally, from the traditional pipe-bound system and system culture.

  • 23.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    A place in the memory of nation: minority policy towards the Finnish speakers in Sweden and Norway2002In: Acta Borealia, ISSN 0800-3831, E-ISSN 1503-111X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 103-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is devoted to an analysis of language policy towards the Finnish-speaking minorities in Sweden and Norway from the end of the nineteenth century until ca. 1940. After the 1880s, the language policy in both countries turned into a nationalistic phase. The common underlying doctrine was to transmit the majority language and culture to the minorities, in order to make them melt into an imagined homogeneous national culture. The minority policy was relatively similar in character in the two countries up to the end of the First World War. After that time it started to diverge. While Norway continued with an assimilative policy without compromises, Sweden adopted a somewhat modified policy. This altered policy in Sweden was partly due to the long continuity and minority status of the Sami and Torne Valley people in the Swedish nation state, but also to elements of modernization and international political change.

  • 24.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Alternative communities among the ethnic minorities in Northern Sweden: a report from an ongoing project1997In: Stat, religion, etnisitet: rapport fra Skibotn-konferansen, 27.-29. Mai 1996 / [ed] Bjørn-Petter Finstad, Tromsø: Universitetsbiblioteket i Tromsø, 1997, p. 453-462Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Arvostelu Teemu Ryyminin väitöskirjasta "De nordligste finner" ("Pohjoisimmat suomalaiset")2005In: Arina - Nordisk tidskrift for kvensk forskning - Pohjoismainen kveenitutkimuksen aikakausjulkaisu, ISSN 1502-8119, no 1, p. 118-125Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Recension av Ryymin, Teemu, : "De nordligste finner" : fremstillingen av kvenene i den finske litteraere offentligheten 1800-1939. 2003, ISBN 82-92201-08-4

  • 26.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Assimilation policy towards the ethnic minorities in Northern Sweden 1809-19391999In: Circumpolar change: building a future on experiences from the past / [ed] Håkan Myrlund; Lars Carlsson, Luleå tekniska universitet, 1999, p. 127-138Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Bidrag i samlingskapitlet "Regione e storia regionale in Europa. Antitesi o metafora della nazione?": discussion a cura di Rolf Petri2006In: Storie Regionali: Memoria e Ricerca. Rivista di storia contemporanea, Ravenna: FrancoAngeli , 2006, p. 107-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    De fem nationella minoriteterna i Sverige2008In: Kulturutskottets offentliga utfrågning om de fem nationella minoriteternas kultur, Stockholm: Sveriges riksdag , 2008, p. 8-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Den nordiska minoritetspolitiken som demokratiskt experiment2009In: Är vi inte alla minoriteter i världen?: Rättigheter för urfolk, nationella minoriteter och invandrare., Stockholm: Ordfront förlag, 2009, p. 242-258Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Det förbjudna finska språket: språkpolitik och kulturell revitalisering i Tornedalen2002In: Provins : nordsvenskt magasin, ISSN 0280-9974, no 4, p. 48-57Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Det mångkulturella Norrbotten2006In: Norrbottensakademien årsskrift 2004-2005, Luleå: Norrbottensakademien , 2006, p. 41-56Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Etniska grupper och regioner som minnesplatser2008In: Kanon och kulturarv: historia och samtid i Danmark och Sverige, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2008, p. 201-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Ett uthålligt språk: genomförande av lagarna om användning av minoritetsspråk i förvaltningsområdena i Norrbottens län åren 2000-20042005In: Nationella minoriteter och minoritetsspråk, Stockholm: Sveriges riksdag , 2005, p. 75-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    From ethnic groups to neo-tribes: identity transformation in the age of the declining nation state2007In: Challenges of globalisation and regionalisation: proceedings I from the conference Regional Northern Identity : from past to future at Petrozavodsk State University, Petrozavodsk 2006 / [ed] Lars Elenius; Christer Karlsson, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2007, p. 40-54Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Få tjänstemän talar samiska2006In: I & M, ISSN 1404-6857, no 2, p. 15-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Minoritetsspråkslagarna har stärkt de nationella minoriteternas identitet och självuppfattning. Språkens status måste dock höjas vid myndigheter och förvaltningar för att de ska bevaras. Samiska och meänkieli talas i dag mest bland äldre.

  • 36.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Förlusten av Finland - ett svenskt trauma1999In: Svenska överord: en bok om gränslöshet och begränsningar, Eslöv: Brutus Östling bokförlag Symposion AB , 1999, p. 75-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Förord2007Other (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Förord2007Other (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Förundersökning. Centrum för forskning om nationella minoriteter vid Luleå tekniska universitet2007Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Förändrade identifikationer på Nordkalotten2009In: Fredens konsekvenser: samhällsförändringar i norr efter 1809, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2009, p. 25-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Guds ord på meänkieli och samiska: kyrkan och språkpolitiken under fyra biskopar2008In: Norrbotten, Luleå: Norrbottens hembygdsförbund , 2008, p. 236-252Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Hur äkta kan man bli som tornedaling?2006In: Met-aviisi, ISSN 1104-0939, no 1, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Identiteter i Tornedalen2010In: Tornionlaakson vuosikirja: Raja 200 vuotta, Torneå: Tornedalsrådet - Tornionlaakson maakuntamuseo , 2010, p. 329-353Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Industrialization in northernmost Europe2007In: The Industrialisation process in the Barents region: proceedings from the conference The Industrialisation process in the Barents region at Pomor State University, Arkhangelsk 2005, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2007, p. 9-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Kategoriernas makt på Nordkalotten2009In: Är vi inte alla minoriteter i världen?: rättigheter för urfolk, nationella minoriteter och invandrare, Stockholm: Ordfront förlag, 2009, p. 78-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Kulturhistorisk beskrivning av byarna Kaunisvaara och Sahavaara i Pajala kommun2008Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Kväner: en föränderlig identitet på Nordkalotten2007In: Historisk rätt?: Kultur, politik och juridik i norr, Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetetet , 2007, p. 88-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Language skift and nation building: the case of the Finns in northern Sweden2003In: Crossing borders, changing minds?, Kristiansand: Høyskoleforlaget AS , 2003, p. 87-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Luleå stift och språkpolitiken2003In: År av liv: Luleå stift 1904-2004, Luleå: Luleå stift, Svenska kyrkan , 2003, p. 148-151Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
    Lärarutbildning för en mångkulturell landsdel2007In: Lära till lärare i norr: lärarutbildningen i Luleå 100 år, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2007, p. 94-114Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1234567 1 - 50 of 331
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