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  • 1.
    Gorton, David
    et al.
    Royal Academy of Music, London, UK.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Choose Your Own Adventure Music: On the Emergence of Voice in Musical Collaboration2016In: Contemporary Music Review, ISSN 0749-4467, E-ISSN 1477-2256, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 579-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practices of collaborating composers and performers have been receiving increasing attention within academic discourse. Such collaborations are often presented from two complementary perspectives: pre-compositional joint invention and post-compositional negotiations in the realisation of a score and its notation. This article attempts to bridge the gap between the two perspectives through a discussion on the emergence of ‘voice’ that pervades the artistic practice, and binds the pre- and post-compositional phases together. Two compositions by David Gorton, written in collaboration with guitar player Stefan Östersjö, will be examined:Forlorn Hopefor 11-string alto guitar and optional live electronics andAusterity Measures Ifor 10-string guitar. Both pieces are the result of an extended pre-composition experimental phase, and both pieces attempt to recreate something of those experiments in the contexts of their performance, establishing the conditions for the emergence of a ‘discursive voice’ of both composer and performer

  • 2.
    Hogg, Bennett
    et al.
    University of Newcastle.
    Östersjö, Stefan
    Patterns of Ecological and Aesthetic Co-evolution: Tree-guitars, River-violins and the Ecology of Listening2015In: Contemporary Music Review, ISSN 0749-4467, E-ISSN 1477-2256, Vol. 34, no 44, p. 335-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The move ‘outside’ of the concert hall has repercussions for listening and creative practice beyond simply resituating ‘music’. The building of an environmentally specific instrumentarium draws onin situexploration and cultivation of affordances, but also on the embodied pre-existent knowledge of the artists concerned. A sense of space/place and strategies of listening work together both to situate emergent creative practices within a landscape and to take the affordances of that landscape, the instruments constructed there, and embodied musical experience forward into completed artistic and musical works.

  • 3. Östersjö, Stefan
    Go To Hell: towards a gesture-based compositional practice2016In: Contemporary Music Review, ISSN 0749-4467, E-ISSN 1477-2256, Vol. 35, no 4-5, p. 475-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses musical gesture from an understanding of musical perception as embodied and enactive, also drawing specifically on Denis Smalley’s [(2007). Space-form and the acousmatic image.Organised Sound,12(1), 35–58] analysis of performed space. I will provide examples of how choreographies (performed by musicians, with and without their instruments), new music (for Vietnamese and Western instruments), installations, and video art have all been drawn from analysis of gesture in Östersjö’s performance of the guitar compositionToccata Orpheusby Rolf Riehm [1990.Toccata Orpheus. Munich: Ricordi]. In Riehm’s piece, the bodily action of the performer is treated as an intentional compositional parameter and the notated structure thus generates a specific choreography in performance. InGo To Hell, this approach is taken further towards the development of a gesture-based compositional practice, where composition is understood, not as the organisation of sound objects, but as the structuring of gestural-sonic objects. 

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