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  • 1.
    Brändström, Sture
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Wiklund, Christer
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Lundström, Erik
    Framnäs folkhögskola.
    Developing distance music education in arctic Scandinavia: electric guitar teaching and master classes2012In: Music Education Research, ISSN 1461-3808, E-ISSN 1469-9893, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 448-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article was to present the project Vi r Music, with a focus on electric guitar teaching (Case 1) and master classes (Case 2). What were the benefits and shortcomings in the two cases and how did online teaching differ from face-to-face teaching? A guitar teacher with a specialisation in jazz music introduced distance teaching to three of his students. Under supervision the students taught upper-secondary students living 290 km from the university. The guitar lessons were held with the use of Skype. In the project, 11 distance master classes were also studied. The devices used were a video-conference system, external microphones and speakers, and 50–52′′ TV screens. The methods for data collection in both cases were above all qualitative interviews with teachers and students and to some degree observation of the teaching sessions. The overall impression from the study was that teachers and students seemed to consider the online teaching in the project a positive experience. The informants looked upon the distance-learning situation as a fruitful complement to face-to-face teaching. Because of the time delay, the most difficult part of the online teaching was playing together or marking the rhythm. The results suggested that video-conference teaching is more intensive than face-to-face teaching and requires both thorough planning and readiness to improvise during the lesson.

  • 2.
    Ferm, Cecilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Openness and awareness: roles and demands of music teachers2006In: Music Education Research, ISSN 1461-3808, E-ISSN 1469-9893, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 237-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to present and discuss the background to and the result of my thesis Openness and awareness-a phenomenological study of music teaching and learning interaction , which studies music teachers in Swedish ordinary schools teaching pupils aged from 10 to 12. The aim of the study was to describe, analyse and try to understand music teaching and learning interactions between teachers and pupils in music lessons in Years 4-6 of compulsory school. The focus was on the teacher's words, actions and reflections. In what ways do teachers interact with pupils in musical learning processes? What aspects of teaching and learning interactions are important when the aim is to offer the pupils, musical experience? I present the results from my methodological standpoints, which belong to a life-world-phenomenological way of thinking. This implies that the world is around us and in us, we are in the world, but experience it in different ways depending on our earlier experiences. I present my view of learning music, which among other things emphasises that learning is not constituted in a vacuum, but is instead found in a complex context. These presumptions made me choose observation and written reflections as methods to capture the music teaching and learning interactions. The answers to the research questions, themes and aspects of music teaching and learning interactions, are presented in two separate parts. The first part is based on the observations with themes focusing on how the teachers related to the incorporated musical knowledge of the pupils; in which ways were the teachers open to the initiatives of the pupils; how musical experience was made possible; how the acts of the pupils were handled; and finally, which symbols were used in the interactions. The second part is based on the teachers' reflections and is presented in two themes; conditions that influence the quality of the interaction; and balance. I make clear how the themes relate to each other, and describe the phenomenon of teaching and learning interaction as a whole. I also attempt to illuminate the roles and demands of the teachers through a close look at one of the themes: making further musical experience possible .

  • 3. Ferm, Cecilia
    Playing to teach music: embodiment and identity-making in musikdidaktik2008In: Music Education Research, ISSN 1461-3808, E-ISSN 1469-9893, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 361-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Musikdidaktik is a central subject within music teacher training in the Nordic countries. In musikdidaktik acts of teaching (music) and learning (musikdidaktik) constitute possibilities for identity formation. The objective of learning is closely connected to their future profession, in which musical and educational competences are blended, combined and used in different ways. The study presented in this article was based on a phenomenological way of thinking about education as an arena for identity development. Students' identity formation in relation to their education in musikdidaktik was investigated. In an interview study where seven musikdidaktik professors and three groups of music teacher trainees participated, the following questions were asked from a phenomenological perspective: How can education in musikdidaktik function as an arena for identity formation? What constitutes processes of music teacher trainees' identity formation? What connections can be seen between ways of teaching musikdidaktik and identity? What competences (are expected to) develop during the processes and how are they connected to employability? The results show that trainee identity formation processes can be communicated. It became evident that awareness of and reflections upon one's own experiences, learning, goals and identity development are important issues in the trainees' identity formation processes. That the trainees had the possibilities to try to act as music teachers proved to be important. When it comes to the challenges for the professor, they are primarily concerned with handling situations in a way that encourages the growth of the trainees, but also challenges them to reflect; and to be a role model, but also to offer them meetings with different role models. The competences that the trainees develop are combined in different ways within the trainees' identity formation. Musikdidaktik constitutes an arena where the students should have the opportunity to be in the world as music teachers through playing to teach music.

  • 4.
    Mars, Annette
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Sæther, Eva
    Malmö Academy of Music, University of Lund.
    Folkestad, Göran
    Malmö Academy of Music, University of Lund.
    Musical learning in a cross-cultural setting: A case study of Gambian and Swedish adolescents in interaction2015In: Music Education Research, ISSN 1461-3808, E-ISSN 1469-9893, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 296-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study investigating how adolescents from Sweden and the Gambia learned music while interacting with each other in a concert project conducted in the Gambia. The main aim is to explore in what ways adolescents acquire music and to analyse it in a context of cultural identity. A sociocultural and ethnomusicological approach was employed, drawing on field studies and interviews with the adolescents. The results demonstrate that the students' musical and cultural backgrounds strongly influence the ways in which they learn and how they teach others. Their cultural backgrounds also affect their choice of tools for learning and teaching. The adolescents appear to be more inclined to change their ways of teaching others than to change the methods of their own musical learning. The results suggest that teachers ought not to always use the same methods in teaching their students as they experienced when learning themselves, and that teachers need an ability to identify the learning styles of their students and to create a learning environment that corresponds to this variety.

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