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  • 1.
    Knott, Lauren
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, City, University of London, London, UK.
    Litchfield, Damien
    Department of Psychology, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, UK.
    Donovan, Tim
    Institute of Health, University of Cumbria, Lancaster, UK.
    Marsh, John Everett
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health, Education and Technology, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation. School of Psychology and Humanities, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.
    False memory-guided eye movements: insights from a DRM-Saccade paradigm2024In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 223-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Deese-Roediger and McDermott (DRM) paradigm and visually guided saccade tasks are both prominent research tools in their own right. This study introduces a novel DRM-Saccade paradigm, merging both methodologies. We used rule-based saccadic eye movements whereby participants were presented with items at test and were asked to make a saccade to the left or right of the item to denote a recognition or non-recognition decision. We measured old/new recognition decisions and saccadic latencies. Experiment 1 used a pro/anti saccade task to a single target. We found slower saccadic latencies for correct rejection of critical lures, but no latency difference between correct recognition of studied items and false recognition of critical lures. Experiment 2 used a two-target saccade task and also measured corrective saccades. Findings corroborated those from Experiment 1. Participants adjusted their initial decisions to increase accurate recognition of studied items and rejection of unrelated lures but there were no such corrections for critical lures. We argue that rapid saccades indicate cognitive processing driven by familiarity thresholds. These occur before slower source-monitoring is able to process any conflict. The DRM-Saccade task could effectively track real-time cognitive resource use during recognition decisions.

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  • 2.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Ljung, Robert
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    A sub-process view of working memory capacity: evidence from effects of speech on prose memory2010In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 310-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we outline a framework labelled the "sub-process view" for understanding correlations between working memory capacity (WMC) and other phenomena. This view suggests that "WMC = sub-process1 + sub-process2 + ... + sub-processn" and that any relationship between WMC and another construct is actually a relationship with a specific sub-process covered by the WMC construct. Furthermore, different sub-processes are functionally distinct and they can be measured by specific intrusion errors on WMC tasks. We show that a sub-process (measured by immediate/current-list intrusions) is related to the effects of speech on prose memory (semantic auditory distraction), whereas another sub-process (measured by delayed/prior-list intrusions) is not (Experiment 1 and 2). Furthermore, we developed a new WMC task ("size-comparison span") and found that the relationship between WMC (measured with "operation span") and semantic auditory distraction is actually a relationship between a sub-process (measured by current-list intrusions in our new task) and semantic auditory distraction (Experiment 2). In contrast, previous research has shown that delayed intrusions underlie the correlation between WMC and reading comprehension, whereas immediate intrusions are unrelated to reading comprehension. Taken together, we argue that WMC is related to semantic auditory distraction and reading comprehension for entirely different reasons.

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