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  • 1.
    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A.K.
    et al.
    Department of Electrical, Electronic & Computer Engineering, University of Pretoria.
    Malekian, Reza
    Department of Electrical, Electronic & Computer Engineering, University of Pretoria.
    Maharaj, B.T.
    Department of Electrical, Electronic & Computer Engineering, University of Pretoria.
    Vasilakos, Athanasios
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Molecular Communication and Nanonetwork for Targeted Drug Delivery: a survey2017In: IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials, ISSN 1553-877X, E-ISSN 1553-877X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 3046-3096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular communication (MC) and molecular network (MN) are communication paradigms that use biochemical signalling to achieve information exchange among naturally and artificially synthesized nanosystems. Among the envisaged application areas of MC and MN is the field of nanomedicine where the subject of targeted drug delivery (TDD) is at the forefront. Typically, when someone gets sick, therapeutic drugs are administered to the person for healing purpose. Since no therapeutic drug can be effective until it is delivered to the target site in the body, different modalities to improve the delivery of drugs to the targeted sites are being explored in contemporary research. The most promising of these modalities is TDD. TDD modality promises a smart localization of appropriate dose of therapeutic drugs to the targeted part of the body at reduced system toxicity. Research in TDD has been going on for many years in the field of medical science; however, the translation of expectations and promises to clinical reality has not been satisfactorily achieved because of several challenges. The exploration of TDD ideas under the MC and MN paradigms is considered as an option to addressing these challenges and to facilitate the translation of TDD from the bench to the patients’ bedsides. Over the past decade, there have been some research efforts made in exploring the ideas of TDD on the MC and MN platforms. While the number of research output in terms of scientific articles is few at the moment, the desire in the scientific community to participate in realizing the goal of TDD is quite high as is evidence from the rise in research output over the last few years. To increase awareness and provide the multidisciplinary research community with the necessary background information on TDD, this paper presents a visionary survey of this subject within the domain of MC and MN. We start by introducing in an elaborate manner, the motivation behind the application of MC and MN paradigms to the study and implementation of TDD. Specifically, an explanation on how MC-based TDD concepts differ from traditional TDD being explored under the field of medical science is provided. We also summarize the taxonomy of the different perspectives through which MC-based TDD research can be viewed. System models and design challenges/requirements for developing MC-based TDD are discussed. Various metrics that can be used to evaluate the performance of MC-based TDD systems are highlighted. We also provide a discussion on the envisaged path from contemporary research activities to clinical implementation of the MC-based TDD. Finally, we discuss issues such as informatics and software tools, as well as issues that border on the requirement for standards and regulatory policies in MC-based TDD research and practice.

  • 2.
    Du, Rong
    et al.
    Department of Network and Systems Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 10044, Sweden.
    Santi, Paolo
    MIT Senseable City Laboratory, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA and also with the Istituto di Informatica e Telematica del CNR, 56124 Pisa, Italy.
    Xiao, Ming
    Department of Information Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 10044, Sweden..
    Vasilakos, Athanasios
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Fischione, Carlo
    Department of Network and Systems Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 10044, Sweden.
    The sensable city: A survey on the deployment and management for smart city monitoring2019In: IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials, ISSN 1553-877X, E-ISSN 1553-877X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 1533-1560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In last two decades, various monitoring systems have been designed and deployed in urban environments, toward the realization of the so called smart cities. Such systems are based on both dedicated sensor nodes, and ubiquitous but not dedicated devices such as smart phones and vehicles’ sensors. When we design sensor network monitoring systems for smart cities, we have two essential problems: node deployment and sensing management. These design problems are challenging, due to large urban areas to monitor, constrained locations for deployments, and heterogeneous type of sensing devices. There is a vast body of literature from different disciplines that have addressed these challenges. However, we do not have yet a comprehensive understanding and sound design guidelines. This article addresses such a research gap and provides an overview of the theoretical problems we face, and what possible approaches we may use to solve these problems. Specifically, this paper focuses on the problems on both the deployment of the devices (which is the system design/configuration part) and the sensing management of the devices (which is the system running part). We also discuss how to choose the existing algorithms in different type of monitoring applications in smart cities, such as structural health monitoring, water pipeline networks, traffic monitoring. We finally discuss future research opportunities and open challenges for smart city monitoring.

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