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  • 1.
    Alerby, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Places for silence and stillness in schools of today: A matter for educational policy2019In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 530-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, it is my intention to not only explore the notions and significance of places for silence in education today, but also to develop insights into diverse understandings of silence – such as aspects of power in silence and issues of silent students – to inform school practices and educational policy. The discussion will be illustrated by some students’ experiences of a place in the school’s playground – the silent place known as the Peace Area. The students at this playground emphasised the significance of a silent place, a place of stillness, to visit during one’s time at school. A place for relaxing together with friends, but also a place to be alone with one’s thoughts. The students clearly expressed their desire to withdraw to a silent and peaceful place during the school day. But, how many places of silence and stillness are there in the schools of today? As humans, we are, in our daily life, more or less surrounded by different forms of sounds and noise, but also of silence and stillness, even though we do not always recognise or hear the silence. Silence can also be experienced and understood in various ways: pleasant and something to be longed for or unpleasant and unwelcome – or even in some cases as something to be feared. An essential question to raise for future educational policy is not only to what extent students can be in a place of silence and stillness during the school day, but also whether places of silence and stillness are appreciated in today’s schools.

  • 2.
    Alerby, Eva
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Arndt, Sonja
    Faculty of Education, University of Waikato, New Zealand.
    Westman, Susanne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Philosophical reimaginings of educational places and policy: Through the metaphor of a wardrobe2019In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 460-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to challenge the physical and conceptual boundaries of educational places and spaces with the use of metaphor: the story of Professor Kirke’s magic wardrobe in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first book in The Chronicles of Narnia by CF Lewis (1950). By explicating and theorising the concerns that arise, we provoke diverse ways of thinking about the complexities of shifting, expanding, constantly evolving educational spaces and places. In our theorisations, we draw on the philosophy of the life-world through Maurice Merleau-Ponty, on a post-structural approach through Julia Kristeva’s work, and on the new-materialist perspective of Gilles Deleuze. As these three philosophical perspectives draw upon different basic assumptions about humans and the world, they also illuminate different aspects of a variety of phenomena and concepts, which we elaborate on in this paper to reach a more comprehensive understanding of educational spaces and places. Our argument arises from philosophical engagements with the story of the Pevensie siblings’ transformation – and transportation – to Narnia through the wardrobe, with notions of educational openings and opportunities, to explore possibilities for reimagining the conceptions and realities of places and spaces in education. To conclude, citizens of today, including children, students, teachers, politicians and researchers, need to discuss basic assumptions for education and policy to reimagine the entangled complexities of educational spaces and places.

  • 3.
    Arndt, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Waikato, New Zealand.
    Alerby, Eva
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Westman, Susanne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Editorial: Affect, embodiment and interrelationships: Reconceptualising educational policy through encounters with learning spaces and places2019In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 455-459Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Lindström, Lisbeth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.
    Leisure, government and governance: a Swedish perspective2011In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 183‑192-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The leisure sector has witnessed a tremendous expansion since 1960. The purpose of this article is to analyse the decisions and goals of Swedish government policy during the period 1962 to 2005. The empirical analysis covers government Propositions and governmental investigations. The fields covered are sports, culture, exercise, tourism and recreation. The article concludes that during the last ten years the private sector, led by companies, economic associations and foundations, has expanded its involvement in the leisure sector. Whereas the state used to control all parts of the leisure value chain, it is now possible to distinguish between those who produce, arrange and finance leisure services

  • 5.
    Parding, Karolina
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    McGrath-Champ, Susan
    University of Sydney, Sydney.
    Stacey, Meghan
    University of Sydney, Sydney.
    Teachers, school choice and competition: lock-in effects within and between sectors2017In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 113-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neoliberal forces since the latter part of the 20th century have ushered in greater devolution in state schooling systems, producing uneven effects on the working conditions of teachers, commonly the largest segment of the public sector workforce. Within this context, this paper examines secondary teachers’ working conditions as they relate to the restructuring of the professional landscape that school choice reforms bring. Drawing illustrations from a qualitative study of teachers’ working experiences in the lowest socio-economic status schools, through the ‘middle band’, to the most prestigious and affluent in a metropolitan city in Australia, this paper finds that teachers develop skill-sets that are context specific, creating possible ‘lock-in effects’ within but also between sectors. Moreover, various work arrangement issues seem to reinforce the lock-in effects by making changes between sectors risky and unattractive. We postulate that inter- and intra-sectoral differences, which are exacerbated through school choice processes, have the potential to reinforce and deepen the lock-in effects on teachers, with possible consequences for their future career mobility.

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