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  • 1. Berthon, Pierre
    et al.
    Fischer, Katrin
    Department of Marketing, Bentley University.
    DesAutels, Philip
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    From mummers to new media: captivity, liberation, and the church of life after shopping2011In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 181-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise of new media, it is easy to overlook, not only old media but also mummery-the arcane medium of the flesh-street performances, stage shows, plays, and carnivals. In this paper, we look at the case of Reverend Billy and the Church of Life After Shopping. We begin by re-introducing the term 'mummer' as a traditional medium of expression and conceptually locate it relative to both old and new media. We then provide a brief introduction to captivity narrative studies, specifically looking at the role of humor in providing aesthetic freedom in incarceration. Reverend Billy and the Church of Life After Shopping serve as our case study to show how humor can be used to liberate citizens' thinking around the three Cs of American political ideology: church, capitalism, and consumption; and to highlight how Reverend adroitly integrates the medium mummery, old media, and new media into a unified whole to free consumers from the dominant ideology of US political interlocution. We conclude by offering ways to extend and elaborate upon this research. Mummery Captivity studies New media

  • 2.
    Bigi, Alessandro
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Plangge, Kirk
    Simon Fraser University, Segal Graduate School of Business, Vancouver.
    Bonera, Michelle
    Universita Degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Economia Aziendale.
    Campbell, Colin L.
    Monash University, Faculty of Business and Economics, Caulfield East, Victoria.
    When satire is serious: How political cartoons impact a country's brand2011In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 148-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the case of Italy's Mr. Berlusconi's indiscretions and the effect his scandals have played in the decline of the Italian national brand. National brands are the perceived added value that international consumers place on that country and its products and services. An analysis of recent political cartoons will provide insight into international attitudes regarding Mr. Berlusconi's political and social actions. From this investigation, the authors conclude that a country's political leader's negative image and reputation can have a large negative impact on national brand equity abroad.

  • 3.
    Gunawong, Panom
    et al.
    School of Public Administration, Faculty of Political Science and Public Administration, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Thongpapanl, Narongsak
    Goodman School of Business, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. Research Administration Center (RAC), Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Ferreira, Caitlin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. Red & Yellow Creative School of Business, Cape Town, South Africa.
    A comparative study of Twitter utilization in disastermanagement between public and private organizations2019In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twitter has become a commonly used platform by both public and private organiza-tions to assist with the dissemination of information related to disaster management.This research makes use of a mixed‐method approach in determining the extent andmanner in which Twitter is used to disseminate disaster management information byboth public and private organizations. This research found that public organizationsare bound by strict regulations resulting in a lower volume and smaller variety ofdisaster‐related information being disseminated. The nature of an organizationand the processes of decision making therein are suggested to influence the abilityof an organization to successfully use Twitter as an effective tool for disastermanagement. Organizations in Thailand currently underutilize Twitter for disastermanagement, as neither public nor private organizations use Twitter as a multidirec-tional communication disaster management tool.

  • 4.
    Morkunas, Vida J.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Moore, Shane
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Duncan, Sherese Y.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    A bibliometric analysis of the Journal of Public Affairs2019In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a bibliometric study of the Journal of Public Affairs from its inception in 2001, up to and including the final issue of 2016. The background of the journal is presented, followed by a content analysis of the journal. With a focus on peer‐reviewed articles, 465 articles are analyzed in terms of authorship characteristics, manuscript characteristics, and content characteristics. The analysis and discussion examine the journal's output against its stated aims and provide a detailed overview of the journal's contributions and its impact.

  • 5.
    Pitt, Christine
    et al.
    Division of Industrial Marketing, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Kietzmann, Jan
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Botha, Elsamari
    University of Stellenbosch Business School, Stellenbosch.
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Emotions and sentiment: An exploration of artist websites2018In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 18, no 2, article id e1653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artists of all genres express their emotions through their creations and market their works online. We argue that in marketing their work online, it is important to understand not only the emotional responses of the artistic works themselves but also that the sentiment evoked on their websites matters. Developing the correct website sentiment can have favorable consequences. It can increase the interest of potential consumers, assure that appropriate expectations are set for the actual consumption experience, and lead to increased sales and word of mouth marketing. Online sentiment that is ill-aligned to the emotions the actual offering evokes can have adverse consequences, including disappointment with the actual offering and buyer's remorse. To better understand the online sentiment of artists' websites, we begin by briefly revisiting the interplay between art, emotions, and the issue of online “sentiment.” Then, we describe a study of a sample of artists' websites that had the objective of gauging both the nature of and the extent of the emotions present in its text, as well as gaining an indication of the sentiment of the website. We describe the use of a relatively new content analysis tool to do this. Following this, we explore the data gathered, with the specific purpose of determining whether the emptions expressed on artists' websites can significantly predict sentiment, if so, which emotions tend to be the strongest predictors. We conclude by discussing some managerial implications of the results and by identifying avenues for future research.

  • 6.
    Robson, Karen
    et al.
    Beedie School of Business Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Pitt, Leyland F.
    Beedie School of Business Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Creative market segmentation: understanding the bugs in consumer behavior2013In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 218-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marketers are concerned with the factors that shape and determine consumer behavior because an understanding of this facilitates the market segmentation that is so essential to the formulation of marketing strategy. This paper discusses why certain consumers are willing to share viral content, and argues that segmenting and targeting markets is key to the shareability (and therefore virality) of marketing messages. Physiological and biological determinants of behavior are largely overlooked in market segmentation; this paper introduces readers to the latent prevalence of a long-lived and common brain parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, that explains a statistically significant portion of the variance in many behavioral and cultural variables. We introduce the academic marketing and public affairs community to this biological predictor and its potential effects on willingness to share viral content.

  • 7.
    Wiid-Daly, Maria
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Pitt, Leyland F.
    Segal Graduate School of Business, Simon Fraser University.
    Engström, Anne
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Not so sexy: Public opinion of political sex scandals as reflected in political cartoons2011In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 137-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An analysis of political cartoons of three well-known US political sex scandals is presented to examine how cartoons channel public perception in terms of the involvement of a prominent politician and the difference of opinion based on who the politician is, frame the organization of communal knowledge, and facilitate the grounds upon which some things can be said. On one side of the spectrum, theories of political cartoons presume that political cartoons reflect public attitudes about current events and that by studying cartoons surrounding a sex scandal, public attitudes toward such a scandal can be effectively understood. On the other side of the spectrum, theory argues that cartoons actually persuade and shape public attitudes, intentions, and behaviors. Three prominent former US politicians were selected for the analysis: Eliot Spitzer and the Emperor's Club Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky John Edwards and Rielle Hunter The criteria of narrative, location, binary struggle, and normative transfer were used as a framework to analyze 230 cartoons. The findings suggest that some politicians emerge relatively unscathed from scandals, others are seriously condemned, yet others are obscured or have their roles changed substantially. On the basis of the research criteria, it seems that public reactions and sentiments toward politicians' involvement in a scandal depend on what the scandal was about, where it occurred and what happened there, who the protagonists in the conflict were, and who the loser in the story was. June 2011 10.1002/pa.401 Special Issue Paper Special Issue

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