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  • 1.
    Ashley, Richard
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Walker, Louise
    University of Leeds.
    D.Arcy, Brian
    University of Abertay, Dundee.
    Wilson, Steven
    EPG, Warrington.
    Illmann, Sue
    Illman Young Landscape Design, Cheltenham.
    Shaffer, Paul W.
    Ciria, London.
    Woods-Ballard, Bridget
    HR Wallingford, Wallingford.
    Chatfield, Philip R.
    Welsh Government, Cardiff.
    UK sustainable drainage systems: Past, present and future2015In: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engeneers: Civil Engineering, ISSN 0965-089X, E-ISSN 1751-7672, Vol. 168, no 3, p. 125-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban drainage has developed from an engineering discipline, concerned principally with public health and safety outcomes, into a multifaceted vision linking drainage with environmental and wider social and economic imperatives to deliver multifunctional outcomes. UK attention is too often focused on surface water as ‘a problem’, despite international progress and initiatives showing that an ‘opportunity-centred’ approach needs to be taken. Sustainable drainage systems, or ‘Suds’, can, when they are part of an integrated approach to water management, cost-effectively provide many benefits beyond management of water quality and quantity. New tools are available that can design Suds for maximum value to society but this requires greater collaboration across disciplines to seize all of the opportunities available. This paper introduces those tools and a roadmap for their use, including guidance, design objectives and criteria for maximising benefits. These new supporting tools and guidance can help to provide a business case for greater use of Suds in future

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