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  • 1.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Institute of Powder Metallurgy, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing.
    Guo, Shiju
    Institute of Powder Metallurgy, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing.
    On the processing, microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of cermet/stainless steel layer composites2007In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1467-1477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with layer composites of carbide reinforcements and stainless steel prepared successfully by powder technology. The layer material consisted of two layers. The top layer consisted of reinforcements (TiC and NbC) and 465 stainless steel as the binder material for the carbides. The bottom layer was entirely of binder material (465 stainless steel). The microstructure of the composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microstructural study revealed that the top layer (TiC–NbC/465 stainless steel) showed the typical core–rim microstructure of conventional steel bonded cermets and the bottom layer showed the structure of sintered steel. An intermediate layer was found with a gradient microstructure, having a higher carbide content towards the cermet layer and lower carbide content towards the stainless steel layer. The bending strength of the layered material measured in the direction perpendicular to the layer alignment was remarkably high. The variation of strength as a function of the thickness of the bottom layer revealed that the character of the material changed from the cermet, to a layer composite and then towards metallic materials. The wear resistance of the top layer was studied against high speed steel. The wear mechanisms were discussed by means of microscopical observations on the worn surfaces. The wear was severe at higher wear loads and lower TiC content. Microploughing of the stainless steel matrix was found to be the dominant wear mechanism. Heavy microploughing and rapid removal of material from the wear surface was observed at high wear load. The fracture morphologies of the top, bottom and intermediate layers are reported

  • 2.
    Ardakani, M.G.
    et al.
    Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine.
    McLean, M.
    Shollock, B.A.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Twin formation during creep in single crystals of nickel-based superalloys1999In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 2593-2602Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gorbatov, Oleg
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. Laboratory for Mechanics of Gradient Nanomaterials, Nosov Magnitogorsk State Technical University, Magnitogorsk, Russia.
    Stroev, A. Yu.
    National Research Centre, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, Russia.
    Gornostyrev, Yu. N.
    Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Division RAS, Ekaterinburg, Russia. Institute of Quantum Materials Science, Ekaterinburg, Russia.
    Korzhavyi, P. A.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Division RAS, Ekaterinburg, Russia.
    Effective cluster interactions and pre–precipitate morphology in binary Al-based alloys2019In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 179, p. 70-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The strengthening by coherent, nano-sized particles of metastable phases (pre-precipitates) continues to be the main design principle for new high-performance aluminium alloys. To describe the formation of such pre-precipitates in Al–Cu, Al–Mg, Al–Zn, and Al–Si alloys, we carry out cluster expansions of ab initio calculated energies for supercell models of the dilute binary Al-rich solid solutions. Effective cluster interactions, including many-body terms and strain-induced contributions due to the lattice relaxations around solute atoms, are thus systematically derived. Monte Carlo and statistical kinetic theory simulations, parameterized with the obtained effective cluster interactions, are then performed to study the early stages of decomposition in the binary Al-based solid solutions. We show that this systematic approach to multi-scale modelling is capable of incorporating the essential physical contributions (usually referred to as atomic size and electronic structure factors) to the free energy, and is therefore able to correctly describe the ordering temperatures, atomic structures, and morphologies of pre-precipitates in the four studied alloy systems.

  • 4.
    Hedström, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Han, Tong-Seok
    Yonsei University, Seoul.
    Lienert, Ulrich
    Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL.
    Almer, Jonathan
    Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL.
    Odén, Magnus
    Load partitioning between single bulk grains in a two-phase duplex stainless steel during tensile loading2010In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 734-744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lattice strain tensor evolution for single bulk grains of austenite and ferrite in a duplex stainless steel during tensile loading to 0.02 applied strain has been investigated using in situ high-energy X-ray measurements and finite-element modeling. Single-grain X-ray diffraction lattice strain data for the eight austenite and seven ferrite grains measured show a large variation of residual lattice strains, which evolves upon deformation to the point where some grains with comparable crystallographic orientations have lattice strains different by 1.5 × 10-3, corresponding to a stress of ≈300 MPa. The finite-element simulations of the 15 measured grains in three different spatial arrangements confirmed the complex deformation constraint and importance of local grain environment.

  • 5.
    Jayaram, Vikram
    et al.
    Department of Metallurgy, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.
    Nurni, Viswanathan
    Abinandanan, Thennathur Appandairajan
    Department of Metallurgy, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.
    Dislocation pile-up model for the yield stress of a composite1999In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 1635-1643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A numerical model to simulate yielding in a composite is developed for the transmission of slip across a dissimilar interface through the formation of co-planar dislocation arrays in both phases. A pile-up of dislocations in the soft phase is assumed to nucleate dislocations in the hard phase in which movement is dictated by lattice friction stress. The polycrystalline composite yield stress is calculated by determining the equilibrium positions of the dislocation arrays as a function of the length scales, elastic constants and Burgers vectors in the two phases, with particular reference to melt oxidized Al-Al2O3, in which homophase boundaries are absent, and to the commercially important system Co-WC. The hardness values predicted from this model are in good agreement with experimentally measured values in the above systems. The implications of these results for the design of hard composite microstructures are elucidated.

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