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  • 1.
    Alvi, Sajid
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE‐412 96 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Milczarek, Michal
    Department of Mechanics of Materials (ZMM), Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland.
    Jarzabek, Dariusz M.
    Department of Mechanics of Materials (ZMM), Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland.
    Hedman, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Research Center for Computational Design of Advanced Functional Materials, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1‐1‐1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305‐8568 Japan; Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Ulsan, 44919 Republic of Korea.
    Gilzad Kohan, Mojtaba
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Levintant-Zayonts, Neonila
    Department of Mechanics of Materials (ZMM), Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30172 Mestre Venezia, Italy.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Enhanced mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of high‐entropy HfMoNbTaTiVWZr thin film metallic glass and its nitrides2022In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 24, no 9, article id 2101626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inception of high-entropy alloy promises to push the boundaries for new alloy design with unprecedented properties. This work reports entropy stabilisation of an octonary refractory, HfMoNbTaTiVWZr, high-entropy thin film metallic glass, and derived nitride films. The thin film metallic glass exhibited exceptional ductility of ≈60% strain without fracture and compression strength of 3 GPa in micro-compression, due to the presence of high density and strength of bonds. The thin film metallic glass shows thermal stability up to 750 °C and resistance to Ar-ion irradiation. Nitriding during film deposition of HfMoNbTaTiVWZr thin film of strong nitride forming refractory elements results in deposition of nanocrystalline nitride films with compressive strength, hardness, and thermal stability of up to 10 GPa, 18.7 GPa, and 950 °C, respectively. The high amount of lattice distortion in the nitride films leads to its insulating behaviour with electrical conductivity as low as 200 S cm−1 in the as-deposited film. The design and exceptional properties of the thin film metallic glass and derived nitride films may open up new avenues of development of bulk metallic glasses and the application of refractory-based high entropy thin films in structural and functional applications.

  • 2.
    Hua, Jing
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Björling, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Larsson, Roland
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Controllable Friction of Green Ionic Liquids via Environmental Humidity2020In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 22, no 5, article id 1901253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligent control of friction is an attractive but challenging topic. In this work, it is investigated if it would be possible to adjust friction in a lubricated contact by controlling environmental humidity. By exploiting the ability to adjust the environmental humidity by various saturated salt solutions, friction behavior of contacts lubricated with Choline l‐Proline ([Cho][Pro]) is modulated in a wide range of relative humidity (RH). The friction increases when the environmental humidity is increased and decreases when water is partially evaporated to a lower RH. It is thus possible to control friction by environmental humidity. The addition of water in ionic liquids (ILs) causes a decrease in viscosity, but as the tests are calculated to be performed in boundary lubrication the viscosity change is not the main factor for the change in friction. The friction sensitivity of RH can be explained by the effect of adhesion on the water uptake from humid air by [Cho][Pro]. Furthermore, the reversible changes of H‐bond types determined by the water content could be another explanation to the altered friction.

  • 3.
    Liu, Yanan
    et al.
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, P. R. China.
    Cai, Xiaoping
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, P. R. China.
    Sun, Zhi
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, P. R. China.
    Zhang, Hanzhu
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Czujko, Tomasz
    Faculty of Advanced Technologies and Chemistry, Department of Advanced Materials and Technologies, Military University of Technology, 00‐908 Warszawa, Poland.
    Feng, Peizhong
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, P. R. China.
    Fabrication and Characterization of Highly Porous FeAl‐Based Intermetallics by Thermal Explosion Reaction2019In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 21, no 4, article id 1801110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous FeAl-based intermetallics with different nominal compositions ranging from Fe–40 at% Al to Fe–60 at% Al are prepared by a novel process of thermal explosion (TE) mode. The results show that the Al content significantly affects the combustion behavior of the specimens, the ignition temperature of the Fe–Al intermetallics varies from 641 to 633 °C and the combustion temperature from 978 to 1179 °C. The porous materials exhibit uniform pore structures with porosities and average pore sizes of 52–61% and 20–25 µm, respectively. The TE reaction is the dominant pore formation mechanism regardless of the alloy composition. However, differences in the porosity and average pore size are observed depending on the Al content. The compressive strength of porous Fe–Al intermetallics is in the range of 23–34 MPa, duly applied as filters. Additionally, a surface alumina layer is formed at the early stage and both of the oxidation process and the sulfidation process follows the familiar parabolic rate law in the given atmosphere, exhibiting excellent resistance to oxidation and sulfidation. These results suggest that the porous Fe–Al intermetallics are promising materials for applications in harsh environments with a high-temperature sulfide-bearing atmosphere, such as in the coal chemical industry.

  • 4.
    Moritz, Juliane
    et al.
    Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), 01069, Dresden, Germany; Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    Teschke, Mirko
    Chair of Materials Test Engineering (WPT), TU Dortmund University, 44227, Dortmund, Germany.
    Marquardt, Axel
    Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), 01069, Dresden, Germany; Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    Heinze, Stefan
    Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), 01069, Dresden, Germany.
    Heckert, Mirko
    Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), 01069, Dresden, Germany.
    Stepien, Lukas
    Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    López, Elena
    Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    Brueckner, Frank
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development. Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277 Dresden, Germany.
    Walther, Frank
    Chair of Materials Test Engineering (WPT), TU Dortmund University, 44227, Dortmund, Germany.
    Leyens, Christoph
    Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), 01069, Dresden, Germany; Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    Influence of Two-Step Heat Treatments on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a β-Solidifying Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated via Electron Beam Powder Bed Fusion2023In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 25, no 2, article id 2200931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing technologies, particularly electron beam powder bed fusion (PBF-EB/M), are becoming increasingly important for the processing of intermetallic titanium aluminides. This study presents the effects of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and subsequent two-step heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the TNM-B1 alloy (Ti–43.5Al–4Nb–1Mo–0.1B) fabricated via PBF-EB/M. Adequate solution heat treatment temperatures allow the adjustment of fully lamellar (FL) and nearly lamellar (NL-β) microstructures. The specimens are characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray computed tomography (CT), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The mechanical properties at ambient temperatures are evaluated via tensile testing and subsequent fractography. While lack-of-fusion defects are the main causes of failure in the as-built condition, the mechanical properties in the heat-treated conditions are predominantly controlled by the microstructure. The highest ultimate tensile strength is achieved after HIP due to the elimination of lack-of-fusion defects. The results reveal challenges originating from the PBF-EB/M process, for example, local variations in chemical composition due to aluminum evaporation, which in turn affect the microstructures after heat treatment. For designing suitable heat treatment strategies, particular attention should therefore be paid to the microstructural characteristics associated with additive manufacturing.

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  • 5.
    Moritz, Juliane
    et al.
    Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), Technische Universität Dresden, 01069, Dresden, Germany; Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    Teschke, Mirko
    Chair of Materials Test Engineering (WPT), TU Dortmund University, 44227, Dortmund, Germany.
    Marquardt, Axel
    Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), Technische Universität Dresden, 01069, Dresden, Germany; Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    Stepien, Lukas
    Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    López, Elena
    Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    Brueckner, Frank
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development. Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277 Dresden, Germany.
    Walther, Frank
    Chair of Materials Test Engineering (WPT), TU Dortmund University, 44227, Dortmund, Germany.
    Leyens, Christoph
    Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), Technische Universität Dresden, 01069, Dresden, Germany; Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277, Dresden, Germany.
    Influence of Electron Beam Powder Bed Fusion Process Parameters at Constant Volumetric Energy Density on Surface Topography and Microstructural Homogeneity of a Titanium Aluminide Alloy2023In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 25, no 15, article id 2201871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In powder bed fusion additive manufacturing, the volumetric energy density E V is a commonly used parameter to quantify process energy input. However, recent results question the suitability of E V as a design parameter, as varying the contributing parameters may yield different part properties. Herein, beam current, scan velocity, and line offset in electron beam powder bed fusion (PBF-EB) of the titanium aluminide alloy TNM–B1 are systematically varied while maintaining an overall constant E V. The samples are evaluated regarding surface morphology, relative density, microstructure, hardness, and aluminum loss due to evaporation. Moreover, the specimens are subjected to two different heat treatments to obtain fully lamellar (FL) and nearly lamellar (NLγ) microstructures, respectively. With a combination of low beam currents, low-to-intermediate scan velocities, and low line offsets, parts with even surfaces, relative densities above 99.9%, and homogeneous microstructures are achieved. On the other hand, especially high beam currents promote the formation of surface bulges and pronounced aluminum evaporation, resulting in inhomogeneous banded microstructures after heat treatment. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the individual parameters instead of E V in process optimization for PBF-EB.

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  • 6.
    Moritz, Juliane
    et al.
    Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Dresden, Germany; Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277 Dresden, Germany.
    Teschke, Mirko
    Chair of Materials Test Engineering (WPT), TU Dortmund University, 44227 Dortmund, Germany.
    Marquardt, Axel
    Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Dresden, Germany; Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277 Dresden, Germanyterial and Beam Technology IWS, 01277 Dresden, Germany.
    Stepien, Lukas
    Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277 Dresden, Germany.
    López, Elena
    Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277 Dresden, Germany.
    Brueckner, Frank
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development. Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277 Dresden, Germany.
    Walther, Frank
    Chair of Materials Test Engineering (WPT), TU Dortmund University, 44227 Dortmund, Germany.
    Leyens, Christoph
    Institute of Materials Science (IfWW), Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Dresden, Germany; Technology Field Additive Manufacturing and Surface Technologies, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS, 01277 Dresden, Germany.
    Locally Adapted Microstructures in an Additively Manufactured Titanium Aluminide Alloy Through Process Parameter Variation and Heat Treatment2023In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 25, no 2, article id 2200917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron beam powder bed fusion (PBF-EB/M) has been attracting great research interest as a promising technology for additive manufacturing of titanium aluminide alloys. However, challenges often arise from the process-induced evaporation of aluminum, which is linked to the PBF-EB/M process parameters. This study applies different volumetric energy densities during PBF-EB/M processing to deliberately adjust the aluminum contents in additively manufactured Ti–43.5Al–4Nb–1Mo–0.1B (TNM-B1) samples. The specimens are subsequently subjected to hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and a two-step heat treatment. The influence of process parameter variation and heat treatments on microstructure and defect distribution are investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as X-ray computed tomography (CT). Depending on the aluminum content, shifts in the phase transition temperatures can be identified via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It is confirmed that the microstructure after heat treatment is strongly linked to the PBF-EB/M parameters and the associated aluminum evaporation. The feasibility of producing locally adapted microstructures within one component through process parameter variation and subsequent heat treatment can be demonstrated. Thus, fully lamellar and nearly lamellar microstructures in two adjacent component areas can be adjusted, respectively.

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  • 7.
    Müller, Michael
    et al.
    Department of Additive Manufacturing, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology, Winterbergstraße 28, Dresden, 01277 Germany; Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Dresden University of Technology, Helmholtzstr. 7, Dresden, 01069 Germany.
    Stellmacher, André
    Department of Additive Manufacturing, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology, Winterbergstraße 28, Dresden, 01277 Germany.
    Riede, Mirko
    Department of Additive Manufacturing, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology, Winterbergstraße 28, Dresden, 01277 Germany.
    López, Elena
    Department of Additive Manufacturing, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology, Winterbergstraße 28, Dresden, 01277 Germany.
    Brueckner, Frank
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development. Department of Additive Manufacturing, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology, Winterbergstraße 28, Dresden, 01277 Germany.
    Leyens, Christoph
    Department of Additive Manufacturing, Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology, Winterbergstraße 28, Dresden, 01277 Germany; Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Dresden University of Technology, Helmholtzstr. 7, Dresden, 01069 Germany.
    Multimaterial Additive Manufacturing of graded Laves phase reinforced NiAlTa structures by means of Laser Metal Deposition2022In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 24, no 4, article id 2100993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, the Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has gained a lot of attention for processing crack prone high temperature materials such as nickel based superalloys or intermetallics. This contribution presents a feasibility study on LMD of a graded transition from binary ß-NiAl to Ni50Al42Ta8 with the aim to show the possibility of manufacturing ß-NiAl based structures with a spatially resolved microstructure and subsequently tailored mechanical properties. For achieving this the alloys Ni50Al50 and Ni50Al42Ta8 are co-injected into the process zone and the powder feeding rates are adapted in a layer-wise manner. Due to pre-heating temperatures of up to 1000 °C the transition can be manufactured with high relative density and a low degree of cold cracking. Scanning electron microscopy of the transition zone shows the formation of a fine dendritic microstructure consisting of ß-NiAl dendritic and NiAlTa interdendritic regions. Large area energy dispersive x-ray analysis reveals a gradient in NiAlTa Laves phase content with increasing build height. The observed volume fraction of Laves phase corresponds well to reported values from cast ingots. Finally, hardness measurements along the build-up direction show an increase in hardness from 300 HV0.1 to 680 HV0.1 indicating a tremendous increase in tensile strength.

  • 8.
    Wang, Jinxin
    et al.
    Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China; College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China.
    Buck, Dietrich
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
    Tang, Qi
    Mengtian Furnishings Co., Ltd., Jiashang, Zhejiang, 314100, China.
    Guan, Jun
    Mengtian Furnishings Co., Ltd., Jiashang, Zhejiang, 314100, China.
    Zhou, Xueliang
    Mengtian Furnishings Co., Ltd., Jiashang, Zhejiang, 314100, China.
    Wu, Zhanwen
    Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China; College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China.
    Cao, Pingxiang
    Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China; College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China.
    Guo, Xiaolei
    Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China; College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China.
    Zhu, Zhaolong
    Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China; College of Furnishings and Industrial Design, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China.
    Machining Properties of Stone-Plastic Composite Based on an Empirically Validated Finite Element Method2023In: Advanced Engineering Materials, ISSN 1438-1656, E-ISSN 1527-2648, Vol. 25, no 8, article id 2201386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-cutting performance is an essential metric for improving the suitability of materials for industrial applications. Herein, the machining properties of stone-plastic composite are assessed through a finite element method to explore orthogonal cutting behavior by diamond cutters. The key aspects examined in this work are the effects of tool geometry and cutting parameters on the cutting force, temperature, chip formation, von Mises stress, and surface quality finish. Primary findings show that chip continuity increases proportionally with increase in rake angle but decreases with cutting speed and depth. Meanwhile, both cutting stability and surface quality are negatively correlated with cutting speed and depth but positively correlated with rake angle. These results support the adoption of cutting conditions using greater rake angle, higher cutting speed, and shallower cutting depth to obtain higher cutting performance, that is, greater cutting stability and surface quality in the finishing machining of stone-plastic composites.

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