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  • 1.
    Foorginezhad, S.
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.
    Zerafat, M. M.
    Faculty of Advanced Technologies, Nano-Chemical Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz, 71348-51154, Iran.
    Asadnia, M.
    School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, 2109, Australia.
    Rezvannasab, Gh
    Faculty of Advanced Technologies, Nano-Chemical Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz, 71348-51154, Iran.
    Activated porous carbon derived from sawdust for CO2 capture2024In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 0254-0584, E-ISSN 1879-3312, Vol. 317, article id 129177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, especially CO2, highlights the critical demand for efficient CO2 capture technologies. This is due to their essential role in climate change and their profound impact on global ecosystems and human well-being. Activated carbons have emerged as promising candidates for CO2 capture due to their availability, cost-effectiveness, and tunable properties. In this study, activated carbons were synthesized from sawdust carbonized at various temperatures within the 700–1100 °C range and subsequently activated using CO2. Comprehensive characterization was conducted through SEM, FESEM, XRD, TGA, and FTIR techniques to assess the properties. The results reveal that carbonization at 1000 °C yielded an activated carbon with a hierarchical and microporous structure, featuring surface area, pore volume, and pore size of 1651.34 m2/g, 0.69 cm³/g, and <1.76 nm, respectively. Remarkably, this activated carbon exhibited promising CO2 uptake of 9.2 mmol/g at 25 °C and 1 bar. Moreover, a remarkable recyclability over 10 cycles demonstrates its potential for practical CO2 capture applications. Furthermore, the synthesized activated carbon exhibited high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (85/15 v/v), reaching 40.2 at 1 bar and 25 °C. These findings underscore the viability of the as-prepared activated carbon as a desired candidate for efficient and selective CO2 capture, contributing to the ongoing efforts to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the environment.

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  • 2.
    Jimenez-Cadena, G.
    et al.
    CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab.
    Comini, E.
    CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab.
    Ferroni, M.
    CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab.
    Vomiero, Alberto
    SENSOR Lab, Department of Chemistry and Physics, Brescia University and CNR-IDASC.
    Sberveglieri, G.
    CNR IDASC SENSOR Lab.
    Synthesis of different ZnO nanostructures by modified PVD process and potential use for dye-sensitized solar cells2010In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 0254-0584, E-ISSN 1879-3312, Vol. 124, no 1, p. 694-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by physical vapor deposition on glass-ITO substrates. Nanowires and nanosheets were obtained by a single step process using gold nanoparticles and gold thin films as catalyst. 3D nanoarchitectures were obtained by a two-step modified process; the morphology of these structures depends on the catalyst used for the second deposition: gold nanoparticles or zinc acetate seeds. All the nanostructures were characterized by SEM and TEM analyses, which showed the different morphology under same conditions of temperature, pressure, oxide precursor and deposition time. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on these ZnO structures were successfully assembled, using N179 as sensitizer with efficiencies between 0.1% and 0.5%. In spite of the low efficiency of the cells, a novel double PVD process is presented and its integration capability into solar cell devices has been proven. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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  • 3.
    Nazir, S.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, 40100 Sargodha, Pakistan.
    Akbar, W.
    Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, 40100 Sargodha, Pakistan.
    Naseem, Shahnila
    Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, 40100 Sargodha, Pakistan.
    Zulfiqar, M.
    Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, 40100 Sargodha, Pakistan.
    Alay-e-Abbas, Syed Muhammad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Computational Materials Modeling Laboratory, Department of Physics, Government College University Faisalabad, 38040 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Ni, Jun
    State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China; Frontier Science Center for Quantum Information, Beijing 100084, People’s Republic of China.
    Emergence of robust half-metallic spin gap and a sizeable magnetic anisotropy in electron-doped Ca2FeOsO62023In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 0254-0584, E-ISSN 1879-3312, Vol. 294, article id 126946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Half-metallic materials having a large band gap (Eg) along with giant magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) have been proposed to be crucial for the development of magnetic tunnel junctions. Herein, electron-doped Ca2FeOsO6 (CFOO) double perovskite oxide is investigated by employing ab-initio calculations with the inclusion of Hubbard U and spin–orbit coupling effects. Electron doping is realized by introducing Co+2/Ni+2 ion with 3d7 (t2g3 ↑ t2g2 ↓ eg2 ↑ eg0 ↓)/3d8 (t2g3 ↑ t2g3 ↓ eg2 ↑ eg0 ↓) configuration at Fe+33d5 (t2g3 ↑ t2g0 ↓ eg2 ↑ eg0 ↓) site. The thermodynamical, mechanical, and dynamical stability of these motifs for determining the synthesis feasibility at ambient conditions is established by calculating the formation energetics, elastic constants, and phonon band structure, respectively. The undoped CFOO system displays a ferrimagnetic Mott-insulating behavior due to a strong antiferromagnetic coupling between Fe and Os ions. On the other hand, electron doping induces half metallicity in CFOO, where extra electrons provided by TM-dopants produce a repulsion in the partially filled Os t2g3↓ spin-minority channel. As a consequence, the Os bands near the Fermi level are shifted to higher energetics; resulting in a conducting nature for the doped motifs. Therefore, Os ion remains in the mixed formal valence states of Os+5 and Os+6/Os+7, which reduces the moments as well. Most remarkably, a large Eg of 1.26/1.65 eV exists in the spin-majority channel of Co/Ni-doped structure, which is highly desired to effectively suppress the spin-flipping and affirm the large mean free path for spins along with a high spin-filtering response. Our results also demonstrated that the half metallicity of the studied TM-doped CFOO is robust and can be preserved under a reasonable magnitude of biaxial strains ([110]). Additionally, a sizeable MAE constant of ∼×107 erg/cm3 indicates that these materials could be potential candidates for the data storage devices.

  • 4.
    Trublet, Mylene
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Maslova, Marina V.
    Tananaev Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Rare Elements and Mineral Raw Materials, Kola Science Center, Russian Academy of Sciences.
    Rusanova-Naydenova, Daniela
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Antzutkin, Oleg
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Mild syntheses and surface characterization of amorphous TiO(OH)(H2PO4)·H2O ion-exchanger2016In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 0254-0584, E-ISSN 1879-3312, Vol. 183, p. 467-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work focuses on the synthesis of titanium phosphate (TiP1) ion-exchanger containing solely H2PO4-groups. Based on the elemental analyses, TG, 31P MAS NMR, XRD and Raman data, the formula TiO(OH)(H2PO4)·H2O is assigned to TiP1. The synthesis requires a mild heating at 70–80 °C for a short period of time, followed by filtration and HCl-washing of the TiP1 powder. The layered nature and low crystallinity of this sorbent is confirmed by powder XRD technique. The existence of micro and mesopores in the material is established using BET method. The Na+ capacity of TiP1 is determined to be 6.3 meq g−1 which is the highest value reported for H2PO4-based sorbents. The presence of H2PO4 groups is expected to considerably increase both the pH-working range of the TiP1 sorbent and its exchange capacity towards divalent metal ions. All data for TiP1 are compared to the data for amorphous TiP containing mostly HPO4 groups.

  • 5.
    Öhman, L. O.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Ganemi, B.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH.
    Björnbom, E.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH.
    Rahkamaa, K.
    Åbo Akademi.
    Keiski, R. L.
    Uleåborg universitet.
    Paul, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Catalyst preparation through ion-exchange of zeolite Cu-, Ni-, Pd-, CuNi- and CuPd-ZSM-52002In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 0254-0584, E-ISSN 1879-3312, Vol. 73, no 2-3, p. 263-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ion-exchanged zeolite ZSM-5 is the best known catalyst for direct NOx decomposition and a viable candidate for NOx reduction with methane. The preparation is crucial for the efficiency of the conversion and this paper describes the ion-exchange, with Cu2+, Ni2+ or Pd2+, and the dual exchange, with Cu2+/Ni2+ or Cu2+/Pd2+, under appropriate pH and ion concentrations for maximum dispersion.

  • 6.
    Öhman, L.O.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Paul, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Materials aspects of titanium-doped aluminas: 14%Ti/γ-Al2O3/Cu and sulfided Al2O3-TiO2/NiMo2002In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 0254-0584, E-ISSN 1879-3312, Vol. 73, no 2-3, p. 242-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Materials aspects of titanium-doped alumina catalysts are discussed in light of a partly new synthesis route, ion exchange reactions and sulfidation. Starting with a solution of the isopropoxides of aluminum and titanium, we aimed at an Al:Ti ratio of 6:1, which corresponds to the maximum acidity of the final product. Transmission electron micrographs showed that the synthesis gave a product of nearly monodisperse, rectangular particles and X-ray diffractograms revealed an amorphous to nano-crystalline structure reminiscent of γ-Al2O3. The Brunauer-Emmet-Teller area was 340 m2 g-1 and the H+ titration found 3 acidic sites nm-2. These numbers indicate that the titanium modification may fourfold increase the ion exchange capacity of a regular alumina. The importance of titanium modification for catalysis is discussed in connection with selective catalytic reduction with hydrocarbon reactions over Cu/14%Ti-Al2O3 and hydrogenation of 1-Me-naphthalene over sulfided NiMo/Al2O3-TiO2. The Ti4+ ions in the alumina lattice are almost irreducible, but infrared spectra suggested that these ions act as dispersion agents not only for adsorbed Cu2+ ions, but also for a supported phase of sulfided NiMo. Finally, we show that a simple weight control can be used to monitor the sulfidation and to indicate if the synthesis has produced a separate, reducible titania phase.

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