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  • 1.
    Brattström, Anna
    et al.
    Sten K Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Richtnér, Anders
    Stockholm School of Economics .
    Pfluger, Dane
    HEC, Paris .
    Can innovation be measured?: A framework of how measurement of innovation engages attention in firms2018In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 48, p. 64-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many firms manage the innovation process by using metrics. Yet, whether measurement supports or hinders innovation continues to be a topic of debate. To shed new light on this debate, this paper presents a conceptual framework of how measurement engages attention in firms. We draw on attention based theory and conceptualize innovation measurement as an attention-focusing device. We identify two ideal types of measurement practices. i) Directional Measurement: which is based on few and unidirectional metrics and encourages exploitative innovation efforts. ii) Conversational Measurement: which is based on multiple and ambiguous metrics and encourages exploration. We extend theory building in the technology and accounting literatures by theorizing the role of metrics and measurement for attention and by discussing the implications of such attentional engagement for innovation performance. In so doing, we engage closely with the managerial task of managing innovation while simplifying its conditions, thereby providing actionable advice.

  • 2.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lichtenthaler, Ulrich
    University of Mannheim.
    Kurkkio, Monika
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The front end in non-assembled product development: a multiple case study of mineral- and metal firms2012In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 468-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conceptualize the front end in non-assembled product development to be iterative and experiment-based, consisting of three sub-phases: informal start-up, formal idea-study, and formal pre-study. Although some key activities are shared with the front end activities in assembled product development, literature reviews, anticipating requirements of customers’ production processes, analysis of raw materials, anticipation of scale-up problems, and tests in bench-, pilot plant-, and full scale production represent unique activities. In addition, product concepts were frequently developed in parallel, requiring specification of physical, chemical and structural properties. These findings have implications for increasing the success and quality of front end efforts

  • 3.
    Malmström, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Johansson, Jeaneth
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Managing competence acquisition and financial performance: An empirical study of how small firms use competence acquisition strategies2013In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 327-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research has neglected how small firms manage competence acquisition. Based on transaction cost literature, this article identifies competence acquisition management strategies and their implications for performance. We explore this issue using survey data from 842 small, knowledge-intensive firms. The results outline four aspects of competence acquisition management: (1) competence absorbers, (2) social acquirers, (3) market acquirers, and (4) nonacquirers. Furthermore, we hypothesized and found that market acquirers score higher in terms of financial performance than firms following the other strategies. The market acquirer strategy proved particularly effective under conditions of high dynamism.

  • 4. Pesämaa, Ossi
    et al.
    Shoham, Aviv
    University of Haifa.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Ruvio, Ayalla A.
    Fox School of Business, Temple University, PA.
    How a learning orientation affects drivers of innovativeness and performance in service delivery2013In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 169-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relying on organizational innovativeness for long-term growth and profitability can be difficult, time consuming, and expensive. In the context of service delivery of 395 strategic business units (SBU) in Israel's healthcare industry, this paper examines the role of a learning-orientation as a moderator in an integrative model of organizational innovativeness. We find moderation of the impacts of risk-taking, creativity, competitor benchmarking orientation, and environmental opportunities on innovativeness. Moreover, we find the influence on performance pronounced for high learning-oriented SBUs. The paper shows that learning orientation should be considered for understanding effective innovativeness work for competitive service delivery.

  • 5.
    Sjödin, David Rönnberg
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Frishammar, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Managing uncertainty and equivocality in joint process development projects2016In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 39, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process development is key to competitiveness in process industries. However, budget overruns frequently plague process development projects which span organizational boundaries to involve both buyers and suppliers. We identify uncertainty and equivocality as key antecedents causing such negative effects, and investigate the reduction and performance implications of these two variables. An empirical survey of 52 joint process development projects show that project teams reduce uncertainty through early end-user involvement, whereas equivocality can be reduced by joint problem-solving activities among buyers and suppliers.

  • 6.
    Thorgren, Sara
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Boter, Håkan
    Umeå School of Business and Economics, Umeå University.
    Small firms in multipartner R&D alliances: gaining benefits by acquiescing2012In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 453-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study highlights how smaller firms gain advantages through exchange strategies in alliances. Based on a sample of 141 firms involved in multipartner alliances governed by cooperative exchange norms, our findings support the hypothesis that smaller firms are more likely than larger firms to comply with cooperative exchange norms. This finding is especially valid for firms in manufacturing industries and can positively influence new product development. This study is a starting point for additional research investigating how, when, and why firms can benefit from engaging in multipartner alliances, even if they are a relatively small player.

  • 7.
    Thorgren, Sara
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wincent, Joakim
    Örtqvist, Daniel
    Designing interorganizational networks for innovation: an empirical examination of network configuration, formation and governance2009In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 148-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategic SME networks have received significant policy attention, yet a review of the current literature reveals limited attention to the factors that contribute to network innovation. This study examines the influence of the number of member firms (network size), the extent to which a network is based on firm incentives (bottom-up formation), and the extent of development of the governance structure (size of administrative function) on a network's innovative performance. Latent growth modeling with longitudinal data from 53 networks reveals that larger networks and bottom-up formed networks achieve greater innovative performance, and that the administrative function partially mediates these effects.

1 - 7 of 7
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