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  • 1.
    Gao, Chuansi
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Slips and falls on ice and snow in relation to experience in winter climate and winter sport2004In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 537-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper was to investigate whether living experience in winter climate and winter sport helps to prevent slips and falls on ice and snow. A questionnaire survey was conducted among foreigners at Luleå University of Technology of Sweden, where winter season lasts for six months in a year. Seventy respondents replied. The results of ordinal regression showed that the slip frequency according to a 5-point rating scale decreased as the living experience in cold environments increased (B=-0.0113, p=0.019). A logistic regression was applied to model the probability of fall events occurrence based on the experience of living in cold climate. The results showed that the fall events reduced as living experience increased (B=-0.030, p=0.001). Chi-square test showed that fall events in those who took part in winter sport were significantly less than in those who did not participate in winter sport (χ2=10.745, p=0.001). The findings imply that experience of living in cold environments and training in gait balance on ice and snow can have positive effects in preventing slips and falls for inexperienced workers and pedestrians. This study also revealed that the majority of fall events happened on hard ice covered with snow while wearing ordinary winter footwear, indicating the need to improve slip resistance.

  • 2.
    Gao, Chuansi
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Abeysekera, John
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    The assessment of the integration of slip resistance, thermal insulation and wearability of footwear on icy surfaces2002In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 40, no 7-8, p. 613-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prevention of slip hazard in frozen environments is not paid much attention. Current winter and safety footwear does not provide sufficient slip resistance and appropriate wearability for use on icy surfaces. The objectives of this study were to assess the integration of slip resistance, thermal insulation, and wearability of footwear used on icy surfaces, and the anti-slip effect of materials spread on ice using outdoor walking trials. Twenty-five subjects wore four types of footwear walking on five different icy surfaces. A five-point rating scale was used recording wearer's perceptions of slipperiness, thermal comfort and wearability. The results showed that pure ice was perceived as very slippery. Spreading sand (180 g/m(2)) greatly decreased the slipperiness. Slip resistance, thermal insulation and wearability of footwear tested were not properly integrated, and were ranked differently. The tested winter and safety footwear did not provide Sufficient slip resistance and good wearability. In addition to thermal insulation, prevention of slip and fall hazard by improving anti-slip property and wearability must also be priorities for development of footwear for use in cold climate.

  • 3.
    Gotcheva, Nadezhda
    et al.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Tekniikankatu 1, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere.
    Oedewald, Pia
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Tekniikankatu 1, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere.
    Wahlström, Mikael
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo.
    Macchi, Luigi
    Dédale S.A.S, 15 Place de la Nation, 75011 Paris.
    Osvalder, Anna-Lisa
    Chalmers University of Technology, Avdelning design & human factors, Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Alm, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Cultural features of design and shared learning for safety: A Nordic nuclear industry perspective2016In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 81, p. 90-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safe and functional nuclear industry design is a topic of growing interest due to new builds and modernization projects in the operating nuclear power plants. Provided that good design of components and systems is critical for safe operation of the plants, understanding what influences the process of learning for safety in design activities is of utmost importance. The existing literature emphasizes tensions of design activity but pays insufficient attention to the culture of design and its relation to safety and learning. This paper aims at identifying cultural features of design organizations, such as shared conceptions, assumptions, norms, beliefs, and exploring their influence on the process of shared learning for safety. Case studies were carried out in Finland and Sweden to generate insights on cultural characteristics of design in the nuclear domain. The paper indicates the importance of requirements as a media for sharing knowledge and learning in nuclear industry design projects. As the networked aspects of the design work are gradually acknowledged, the need to learn how to systematically manage the requirements and understand the big picture of the overall design project are highlighted.

  • 4.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Lars
    et al.
    Institute for Risk Management and Safety Analysis.
    Ohlsson, Kjell
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Approaches to accident prevention: a comparative study of eleven Swedish authorities1995In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparison has been made between 11 Swedish authorities involved in accident prevention. The authorities' fields of responsibility were in industry, transportation, the environment, and medical care. The aim of the investigation has been to examine approaches to and methods for the prevention of accidents. Representatives from the authorities participated in three seminars and responded to a questionnaire. There are several issues and problems which are of common concern to the authorities. A majority state that one of their greatest problems is to get the "object" of their surveillance to take responsibility, act in a committed manner and work systematically. Also, nearly all state that there are safety problems with computer-controlled equipment and with demands imposed on individuals, e.g., skills demands. At a majority of the authorities, development is in progress of methodologies to be utilized in safety matters. This applies, for example, to the investigation of accidents, surveillance and inspection, and the scrutiny of results from safety analyses. There did not seem to be any appreciable collaboration between authorities across sectoral boundaries with regard to development aimed at safety issues. However, a need for such collaboration appeared to have advantages. Only a few of the authorities gave prominence to contacts with the international scientific community as a means for improving their approaches and working methods in relation to safety.

  • 5.
    Lööw, Joel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Nygren, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.
    Initiatives for increased safety in the Swedish mining industry: Studying 30 years of improved accident rates2019In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 117, p. 437-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates safety-related developments in the Swedish mining industry over a 30-year period, from the 1980s to the 2010s. It studies what may have contributed to lowering the accident frequency rates and improvement of safety more broadly in the industry. On this basis, interviews were conducted with informants from mining companies. This material was supplemented with a workshop with mining health and safety representatives and documents relating to the subject. The results are divided into four main themes, showing that from the 1980s and onwards, lowered rates and general safety improvements followed in the wake of technology development. This was complemented by a more direct focus on organisational aspects of safety beginning in the early 2000s. Still the effectiveness of the individual measures is not clear; while they theoretically have an effect, causality is hard to show. In other words, the improvements may not necessarily depend on the specifics of these initiatives. Given this, the article discusses the different initiatives in-depth, and gives suggestions for future research and industry action. This includes recommendations for approaching safety holistically and the development of new proactive indicators.

  • 6.
    Ruth, Walter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Union goes to university: A training program to balance the employers' dominance in the planning of new technology and organizational development1996In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 23, no 2-3, p. 189-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are several union schools in Sweden with training programs and courses for local union officers and safety representatives on negotiation techniques, agreements, rules and legislation, basic ergonomics, and working environment matters. Swedish universities arrange open courses on diverse topics, running for one or two terms on a part time basis, thereby making it possible to combine studying and working. There are five basic strategies of obstacles to balanced worker's participation, namely ingrained patterns hampering union representatives to act in a new role and employer's control of information, project demarcation, time, and planning language

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