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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Achieving suitable coopetition in buyer-supplier relationships: the case of AstraZeneca2008In: Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, ISSN 1051-712X, E-ISSN 1547-0628, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 425-454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to deal with the two crucial managerial challenges of first identifying and then achieving a suitable balance between cooperation and competition in buyer-supplier relationships.Methodology/Approach: First, a purchasing framework is developed by utilizing principal-agent theory to bridge the literature on transaction cost economics and industrial buying behavior. The practical use of this framework is then empirically illustrated by a case study description of how a construction client's purchasing procedures affect coopetition in a partnering project.Findings: The developed purchasing framework shows how actions taken during the different stages of the buying process affect coopetition in buyer-supplier relationships. It highlights the deficiencies of both the neoclassical competitive focus and the cooperative focus found in the literature on interorganizational relationships. Instead it emphasizes the importance of balancing cooperation and competition.Research Implications: This research shows how the traditional analysis of governance structure can be transformed into an analysis of coopetition. Furthermore, it explores how purchasing procedures affect governance forms through different control mechanisms. It also shows how trust and social context can be integrated into a transaction cost framework through social control.Practical Implications: The developed framework can be used for guiding purchasing decisions. Managers planning to implement coopetitive (cooperative and competitive) relationships should recognize the importance of considering all stages of the buying process. Collaborative tools (e.g., teambuilding, joint objectives, and a shared project office) are useful but not enough to transform an otherwise competitive relationship into a cooperative one. Hence, technical aspects of the buying process need to be addressed as well (e.g., joint specification, bid evaluation, etc.).

  • 2.
    Robertson, Jeandri
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Ferguson, Sarah Lord
    Beedie School of Business Vancouver, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.
    Eriksson, Maria Theresa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences.
    Näppä, Anna
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    The brand personality dimensions of business-to-business firms: a contentanalysis of employer reviews on social media2019In: Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, ISSN 1051-712X, E-ISSN 1547-0628, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 109-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the brand personalities that employees are creating of their employer brands, in particular business-to-business (B-to-B) brands, when describing these brands on social media. We examine how the brand personalities, based on written online reviews, differ between high- and low-ranked, and high- and low-rated brands.

    Methodology/Approach: 6,300 written employee reviews from a social media platform, Glassdoor, are used for content analysis in DICTION, to determine the brand personality dimensions they communicate (J. L). An independent B-to-B brand ranking data source, Brandwatch, is used as a reference to various brands’ level of ranking, while an ANOVA test is used to determine whether there is a difference in the brand personality trait means when comparing high and low-ranked, and high- and low-rated brands.

    Findings: Our findings suggest that a strong social media presence does not equate to a strong employer brand personality perception among employees, since there are no significant differences between B-to-B firms based on their rankings.

    Research Implications: Extant literature has mostly explored the impact of either critical reviews or favourable customer ratings and reviews on company performance, with very little research focusing on the B-to-B context. In addition, research employing DICTION for the purposes of content analysis of reviews is sparse. The methodology used in this study could thus be employed to further compare and contrast the reviews from a single company, dividing top and low starred reviews to compare discrepancies.

    Practical Implications: The results of this study show how online shared employee experiences of employer brands contribute to the formation of a distinct employer brand personality. From a managerial viewpoint, engaging with current and past employees and being cognizant of the online narratives that they share on social media, may be an early indicator of where the firm is lacking (or showing strength) in its’ employee engagement. This would offer a way for firms to both understand their employer brand personality as well as gauge how they compare to top employers in a specific sector or industry.

    Originality/Value/Contribution: The study attempts to grow the literature of employee brand engagement in a B-to-B context, by recognizing the important role that employees play in engaging with their employer brand online. Two main contributions are offered. The first contribution relates to the finding that employees perceive highly-rated B-to-B brands as being more competent, exciting, sincere and sophisticated than low-rated B-to-B brands. Second, the methodology used in this study proves to be a novel and accurate way of comparing employee reviews and perceived employer brand personality, with the employer-created intended brand image.

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