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  • 1.
    Bäckström, Lars
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Pitt, Leyland
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Campbell, Colin
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Nel, Deon
    University of the Witwatersrand.
    Personal acquaintances and salespeople in financial services: differences between customers and friends2009In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 26-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existence, benefit and management of customer-salesperson relationships in the marketing of financial services are topics of increasing interest. Much of the sales and marketing literature implies that because of time spent together, salespeople and some of their customers develop close relationships that are akin to friendships. Evidence from social psychology confirms that strong relationships are founded in deep knowledge of others gained over long periods after sharing personal information. This paper reports on the results of a study of salespeople's assessments of their personal acquaintance with customers and friends in a financial services setting. The results indicate that salespeople do not classify customers as friends on all the dimensions of personal acquaintance. Furthermore, the nature of personal acquaintance differs between 'good' customers (those salespeople enjoy serving), and 'bad' (those they do not), with the exception of the personal acquaintance dimensions of interaction frequency and personal disclosure. We discuss the implications for practice and make recommendations for future research

  • 2.
    Caruana, Albert
    et al.
    University of MaltaMsidaMalta.
    Vella, Joseph
    University of MaltaMsidaMalta.
    Konietzny, Jirka
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Chircop, Saviour
    University of MaltaMsidaMalta.
    Corporate greed: its effect on customer satisfaction, corporate social responsibility and corporate reputation among bank customers2018In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 23, no 3/4, p. 226-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate greed has received increasing attention in recent years with various stories hitting the headlines, particularly after the global financial crisis and the ensuing negative attitudes toward banks. Customer satisfaction and corporate social responsibility are known to have a positive effect on corporate reputation among customers, but perceived corporate greed is likely to impede their effect. Corporate greed, customer satisfaction, corporate social responsibility and corporate reputation are considered, and a research model is proposed. Results indicate that the effect of corporate greed is stronger on corporate social responsibility than on customer satisfaction, implying that corporate social responsibility activities may be futile if the company is perceived to be acting greedily by its customers. Thus, perceptions of corporate greed need to be dealt with swiftly, to enable management to enhance the corporate reputation of the firm.

  • 3.
    DesAutels, Philip
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Berthon, Pierre
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Rising to the challenge: a model of contest performance2011In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 16, no 3-4, p. 263-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contests are a ubiquitous form of promotion widely adopted by financial services advertisers, yet, paradoxically, academic research on them is conspicuous in its absence. This work addresses this gap by developing a model of contest engagement and performance. Using motivation theory, factors that drive participant engagement are modeled, and engagement's effect on experience and marketing success of the contest specified. Measures of contest performance, in-contest engagement and post-contest enduring interest are included. From the model, propositions are developed. Overall, the model provides financial service marketers with a theory-based foundation for designing and operating successful contests.

  • 4.
    Farshid, Mana
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Plangger, Kirk
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Nel, Deon
    Flinders University, Adelaide.
    The social media faces of major global financial service brands2011In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 16, no 3-4, p. 220-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the advent of social media, brand management has become not only more difficult, but also increasingly critical to the credibility and reputation of firms. Moreover, consumer-generated content and its rapid diffusion takes control over advertising-intended messages away from brand managers. Financial services brand managers will not fully be able to control the destinies of their brands, but at the very least they need to be involved in the conversations that speak about their brand. This article suggests a powerful analytical tool Chernoff Faces, which can add to financial service brand managers’ arsenal.

  • 5.
    Näppä, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Professional Support, Studentservice.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Foster, Tim
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Employer branding: Attracting and retaining talent in financial services2014In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 132-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study develops and investigates a framework for better understanding employer branding. More specifically, the overall purpose is to provide a deeper understanding on how employer branding is used to attract and retain talent. An extensive literature review leads to a proposed conceptual framework focusing on two key research questions: How can the relationship between corporate branding, internal branding and employer branding in service industries be described? And, How can the role of corporate values in delivering the brand promise be described? A qualitative, case study approach is used to collect data from a financial services company in Sweden. The data collected and analyzed reveals that the areas of employer, internal and corporate branding are not mutually exclusive, but instead an intertwined collection of branding issues that together form the corporation's core values. All of this together is what allows the corporation to in turn deliver its brand(s) promise to several stakeholder groups

  • 6. Pitt, Leyland F.
    et al.
    Steyn, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Chakrabarti, R
    Financial services and viewer response profiles: psychometric properties of a shortened scale2011In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 16, no 3-4, p. 210-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Schlinger's Viewer Response Profile is a widely used tool in advertising research, in both commercial and academic environments. It is used in ad testing to gauge viewer reactions to television commercials. Initial research on its psychometric properties was critical of the scale; however, more recent work using more sophisticated statistical techniques and larger, more realistic, samples has been much more complimentary. This article reports on the use of a shorter version of the Schlinger scale to test financial services advertisements. The findings generally indicate that the scale can be used with confidence in that environment, and that the shorter scale generally performed well. The limitations of the study are acknowledged, managerial implications are discussed, and avenues for future research are identified.

  • 7. Steyn, Peter
    et al.
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Pitt, Leyland
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Consumer-generated content and source effects in financial services advertising: an experimental study2010In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although advertising has previously been under the control of organizations and their advertising agencies, recent advances in technology have seen the emergence of what has come to be known as ‘consumer-generated advertising' . Consumers are now creating their own ads for the brands they love and hate, using inexpensive software and powerful personal computers, and then distributing these via social networks such as YouTube. The consequences for traditional advertisers are profound. Although services marketing scholars have begun to pay attention to this phenomenon, little is known about the source effects of these types of ads, for example whether viewers think they were created by firms, or consumers like themselves. This article describes a series of experiments designed to test source effects in the context of consumer-generated ads in a fi nancial services context, in which it is found that some source effects are present. Implications for marketers as well as future research directions are identified.

  • 8.
    Treen, Emily
    et al.
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University.
    Pitt, Leyland F.
    Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver.
    Bredican, John
    Division of Industrial Marketing, INDEK, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Farshid, Mana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    App service: How do consumers perceive the quality of financial service apps on smart devices?2017In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 119-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apps on smart devices such as phones and tablets have enabled financial services firms not only to provide greater convenience and flexibility to customers, but also to get them to do a lot of the work entailed in these services. This has changed the character of service in many ways, including the nature of service quality where service is no longer delivered by people, but by means of technology. The study reported here used an amended version of the SERVQUAL instrument to assess consumers’ perception of the quality of the service delivered by the apps of their financial services providers. Three dimensions of app service quality emerge: reliability, personal and visibles. Generally, consumers are reasonable satisfied with the quality of service provided by their financial apps and prefer them to visits to service providers physical locations and rate them as highly as online service provision on PCs or laptops. Limitations are acknowledged, managerial implications drawn and avenues for future research are identified

  • 9.
    Vella, Joseph
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Caruana, Albert
    Pitt, Leyland F.
    Perceived performance, equity sensitivity and organizational commitment among bank managers2012In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study looks at equity sensitivity and organisational commitment and considers the possible moderation role that managers’ perception of organisational performance may have. Using an equity theory perspective, the constructs of equity sensitivity and organisational commitment, as well as the effect of perceived firm performance, are considered. A research model linking their interaction is proposed. Data are collected from managers of a commercial bank and moderated regression is used to test the hypotheses. Results support a positive effect of equity sensitivity on organisational commitment whereas high or low perceived firm performance is found to have a determining effect on this relationship.

  • 10.
    Vella, Joseph
    et al.
    Department of Corporate Communication, University of Malta.
    Wallström, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
    Farshid, Mana
    Division of Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Financial services Apps: What makes the difference between a great and a ghastly review?2017In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 132-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet as we know it, has entered a spiral of decline while mobile Apps are gradually taking over and are steadily changing the way we go about our individual daily lives. This study examines the fact that certain financial services Apps are far more successful than others, specifically by looking at what makes a user think that an App may be great, and give it a favorable review, or that it is rather ghastly, and give it an unfavorable review. Next, we describe a study of six of the most popular financial services Apps on the iTunes App Store, for which reviews were analyzed using DICTION software. Employing Diction variables, ambivalence and temporal terms were prevalent in negative reviews while accomplishment, motion, optimism and certainty, were predominantly expressed in positive reviews. Human interest, on the other hand, seemed to be uniformly distributed between both types of reviews.

1 - 10 of 10
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